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Saturday, June 23, 2018

Oil Port News

Fire Spreads at Libyan Oil Port Terminals

Fires have spread to seven oil tanks at Libya's ports of Ras Lanuf and Es Sider following attacks this week by Islamic State militants, a Petroleum Facilities Guards (PFG) spokesman said on Thursday. Ali al-Hassi said five storage tanks were burning at Es Sider and two at Ras Lanuf. Two tanks were hit by shelling this week and the fires have since spread. Hassi said the PFG remained in control of the area and that there were no clashes on Thursday. Separately, however, at least 65 people were killed on Thursday when a truck bomb exploded at a police training centre in the town of Zliten east of Tripoli, local officials and hospital sources said. Both Es Sider and Ras Lanuf have been closed since December 2014.

Mexico Closes Gulf Oil Port as Cold Front Sweeps In

Mexico's Gulf port of Coatzacoalcos in the state of Veracruz was closed on Friday due to 82 kilometer-per-hour winds spurred by a cold front, port authorities said in a Tweet on Friday.   Almost all of Mexican oil giant Pemex's crude exports are shipped from the ports of Dos Bocas, Cayo Arcas and Coatzacoalcos, en route to Gulf coast refineries in the U.S. states of Texas and Louisiana.   A powerful storm barreled toward Washington, D.C., on Friday, threatening to bury parts of the Middle Atlantic region under as much as 30 inches (76 cm) of snow and bring the nation's capital to a virtual standstill.     (Reporting by Anahi Rama; Editing by Simon Gardner)

Storage Tank at Libya's Ras Lanuf Oil Port Has Collapsed

Photo: NOC

One of two oil storage tanks ignited amid clashes at the Libyan oil port of Ras Lanuf has collapsed after burning for two days, a local engineer and a fire fighter said on Tuesday.Ras Lanuf's storage tank No. 12 was set on fire on Sunday, three days after another storage tank, No. 2 caught ablaze during an attack by an armed group.Libya's National Oil Corporation (NOC) has said that at least 400,000 barrels of storage capacity has been lost due the fires.Reporting by Ayman al-Warfalli Writing by Aidan Lewis

PDVSA Says Operations are Normal at Main Oil Port

Venezuelan state oil company PDVSA on Friday said it guaranteed that operations were normal at its main oil port, adding it had provided "uninterrupted" services to an average of 56 tankers per month. Reuters on Thursday reported heavy backlogs in tanker loadings at the port of Jose, which a union leader and a legislator said were the result of technical problems with loading arms. "PDVSA guarantees normal loading and dispatch at the (port of Jose)," the company wrote on its Twitter account. The company said that 70 percent of the production exported from Venezuela, equivalent to around 1.5 million barrels per day, are loaded at Jose.

Libya Reaches Deal to Reopen Brega Oil Port

Libya state oil company National Oil Corp (NOC) has reached a deal with security guards to end a protest at eastern Brega oil port, which is expected to allow the terminal to reopen on Tuesday, a company spokesman said. Reopening Brega would allow the state-run Sirte Oil Company to start producing again and further boost Libya's output after an end to other port and oilfield protests. Late last week, the NOC said production was around 555,000 barrels per day. (Reporting by Feras Bosalum; writing by Patrick Markey, editing by David Evans)

Full Tanks & Tankers: A Stubborn Oil Glut Despite OPEC Cuts

© Andrei Pashkov / Adobe Stock

After the first OPEC oil production cut in eight years took effect in January, oil traders from Houston to Singapore started emptying millions of barrels of crude from storage tanks. Investors hailed the drawdowns as the beginning of the end of a two-year supply glut - raising hopes for steadily rising per-barrel prices. It hasn't worked out that way. Now, many of those same storage tanks are filling back up or draining more slowly than investors and oil firms had expected, according…

Militia Clashes Spread Towards Zawiya Oil Port

Photo courtesy UK Libyan Embassy

Clashes in Libya spread from Tripoli to the western town of Zawiya near Tunisia's border, where a large oil port is located, killing four people over the last two days, local town council officials said on Thursday. Foreign governments have mostly closed their embassies and evacuated staff after three weeks of clashes turned Libya's two main cities - Tripoli and Benghazi - into warzones in the worst fighting since the NATO-backed war against Muammar Gaddafi. Three years after Gaddafi's fall…

Libya's Largest Oil Port Begins Work

Image courtesy: Ansamed

Libya has begun maintenance of the port of Es-Sider, biggest in the country of the terminal on oil export as part of plans to increase output from Africa’s biggest holder of crude reserves, says RNS. Exports should resume in a month once official orders are received to reopen the port, says Bloomberg quoting Galal Mohamed, head of operations at Waha Oil Co. Es-Sider is part of the plan of the authorities for increase in oil extraction. The port belongs to the Waha Oil company. It has been closed since December, 2014 because of armed attack.

Islamic State Militants Attack Forces Guarding Libya Oil Port - official

Islamic State militants attacked forces guarding one of Libya's main oil ports on Thursday with a gun assault and an attempted car bomb in an escalation of their campaign in the North African state, a local security official said. Islamic State has gained ground in Libya where two rival governments -- one internationally recognized and the other self-declared -- are battling for control, leaving a security vacuum four years after the uprising toppled Muammar Gaddafi. Militants attacked guards at a gate near Es Sider port, which is under the control of forces allied with the recognized government, the security official said. The terminal has been closed since December because of fighting with other rival armed factions and problems at supply oilfields.

Coast Guard Announces Interim Rule

The U.S. Coast Guard has published an interim rule that adjusts limits of liability for vessels and deepwater ports under the Oil Pollution Act of 1990. The interim rule, effective July 31, 2009, increases the current OPA 90 limits of liability for vessels and deepwater ports to reflect significant increases in the Consumer Price Index since the limits were amended by the Delaware River Protection Act of 2006. The rule also increases the current OPA 90 limit of liability for the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port to reflect Consumer Price Index increases since the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port limit was established by regulation in 1995.

Libyan Oil Port Takeover Gives Edge to Eastern Commander

Less than a fortnight after forces loyal to Khalifa Haftar swept into four of Libya's oil ports, tankers are loading, production has jumped, and momentum has shifted firmly in the divisive former general's favour. For Haftar's opponents, and for Western powers, the move on the ports was alarming. Haftar and his backers in eastern Libya have been in a stand-off for months with a unity government in Tripoli, blocking any parliamentary vote to endorse it and challenging the U.N.-mediated deal to unify Libya. How Haftar and his allies will use control of the country's major oil exports - whether to leverage political advantage under that U.N. deal, or to extend military control across Libya - is still uncertain. But risks to stability are clear.

LOOP Tests Crude Exports with VLCC

The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP), the largest privately owned crude terminal in the United States, said on Tuesday it had moored a supertanker and initiated a detailed test procedure, bringing it closer to being able to export crude oil. LOOP said last year its U.S. Gulf Coast facility would have the capacity to load Very Large Crude Carriers (VLCCs), the largest oil tankers, which can ship some 2 million barrels of oil by early 2018. Washington lifted a 40-year ban on oil exports two years ago, and since then tankers filled with U.S. crude have landed in more than 30 countries, ranging from massive economies like China and India to tiny Togo. Gulf Coast terminals handle three-quarters of U.S. crude exports, but only LOOP can handle supertankers.

Es Sider Port Oil Tanks On Fire

A fire at an oil storage tank at Libya's Es Sider oil port has spread to two more tanks, officials said on Friday. The first oil tank was hit during clashes between armed factions allied to Libya's competing governments over control of the country's biggest oil port, located in the east. Es Sider and the nearby Ras Lanuf port have been closed since the fighting broke out two weeks ago. Reporting by Ayman al-Warfalli

Italy's Help Sought to Extinguish Fire at Oil Port

Smoke rises from an oil tank fire in Es Sider port. A fire at an oil storage tank at Libya's Es Sider port has spread to two more tanks after a rocket hit the country's biggest terminal during clashes between forces allied to competing governments.

Libya has called on Italy to send firefighters to prevent a fire spreading out of control at Es Sider, the country's biggest oil port, officials said on Saturday. A rocket hit an oil storage tank last week at the port in the east of the country during clashes between forces allied to Libya's competing governments. Ali al-Hassi, spokesman for a security force allied to the internationally-recognised government, said the fire had spread to a total of five oil tanks. "We are trying to extinguish it but our capacities are limited," he said.

Methanol Plant at Libyan Port Shut after Accidental Blast

A methanol plant in the Libyan oil port of Brega has stopped operations after an accidental explosion caused by a gas leak, an official said on Tuesday.   The plant will remain shut until safe operations can be guaranteed, but it was not clear how long this would take, said Issa Mukhtar, an official at Sirte Oil Company which runs the plant.   One worker was injured by the explosion which occurred early on Saturday and was caused by a leak in a natural gas heating unit, Libya's National Oil Corporation (NOC) said.   Firefighters dealt with the blast, which could be heard across the surrounding area, a Sirte Oil engineer said. (Reporting by Ayman al-Warfalli Writing by Aidan Lewis; editing by David Evans)

Protests Close Libya's Western Zawiya Oil Port

Photo courtesy UK Libyan Embassy

Libya's western Zawiya oil terminal has been closed by protesters preventing some oil product tankers from discharging, a government statement said on Friday. Local citizens demonstrating against the General National Council, the country's parliament, have blocked the entrance to the port preventing oil workers from entering. The connecting oilfield El Sharara and the pipeline itself have been blocked by other protest groups since March. (Reporting by Feras Bosalum, Writing by Julia Payne. Editing by Jane Merriman)

Libya's Zawiya Oil Port Reopens

Sunday. these in the next few hours. Sunday. these in the next few hours.

Zueitina Oil Port Still Closed after Rebel Deal

Libya's eastern Zueitina oil port was still not under government control one week after an agreement with a federalist rebel group to immediately reopen it along with the Hariga terminal, a spokesman for National Oil Corp (NOC) said on Monday.   The spokesman said that NOC was still waiting for confirmation from the government-run Petroleum Facilities Guard that they were able to establish full control over the complex.   NOC was able to lift force majeure on Hariga last week and a tanker is due to load crude there this week. The federalist rebels are still in control of the country's two largest terminals.   (Reporting by Feras Bosalum, Writing by Julia Payne. Editing by Jane Merriman)

Libya's Zueitina Oil Port Reopening Delayed

Liibya's Oil Export Terminal

Technical problems have delayed the reopening of Libya's eastern Zueitina oil export terminal after the government reached a deal with rebels to end an eight-month blockade of the port, a minister said on Sunday. Two weeks ago, the Tripoli government reached an agreement with rebels in the restive east to end their occupation of four oil ports which had halted vital exports. Under the plan, the Hariga and Zueitina ports were due to open immediately while the larger Ras Lanuf and Es Sider terminals would resume oil exports within a month.

Libyan Oil Port Re-Opening Delayed

Technical problems have delayed the reopening of Libya's eastern Zueitina oil export terminal after the government reached a deal with rebels to end an eight-month blockade of the port, a minister said on Sunday. Two weeks ago, the Tripoli government reached an agreement with rebels in the restive east to end their occupation of four oil ports which had halted vital exports. Under the plan, the Hariga and Zueitina ports were due to open immediately while the larger Ras Lanuf and Es Sider terminals would resume oil exports within a month. But justice minister Salah al-Merghani said Hariga port located in Tobruk in the far east would be the only one to start operations due to technical problems at Zueitina.

Libya's Hariga Oil Port Shut Due to Strike

Libya's port (Image: Temehu)

Libya's eastern oil export port Hariga shut down because of a strike over unpaid salaries of  security guards, closing the country's last functioning export port apart from two offshore fields. The closure will lower oil output to less than 300,000 barrels a day, a fraction of the 1.6 million Libya used to pump before the 2011 uprising toppling Muammar Gaddafi. The terminal near Tobruk, with a capacity of 120,000 b/d has by and large escaped disruption thanks to its easterly position.

Libya's Hariga Oil Port Reopens After Strike

Libyan oil export port Hariga has reopened after guards ended a strike over salary payments, and the terminal will start loading tankers once better weather allows, a facility spokesman said on Tuesday. Libya shut most operations at the eastern port, located near the border with Egypt, on Saturday after security guards prevented a tanker from docking in protest over wages. "An oil tanker was supposed to dock at the port this morning but the weather was against this. We will wait until the weather allows us to go ahead," said spokesman Omran Al-Zwie. A closure at Hariga would have cut Libya's oil exports to 100,000 barrels per day or less, based on previous official data.

Libya Reopens Oil Port After Strike

Libya reopened its oil port of Hariga on Tuesday, ending a strike by guards that had threatened to further slash exports as rival factions fight for control of the OPEC country. The threat to shut down Hariga underlined the fragility of oil shipments as two competing governments and their armed allies are locked in a scramble for territory and petroleum wealth. Hariga reopened shortly before the United Nations was expected to hold talks to prevent a wider conflict that Western governments fear will turn Libya into a failed state just across the Mediterranean from Europe. Libya shut most operations at the Hariga terminal near Egypt's border, the last functioning land oil export terminal, on Saturday after security guards prevented a tanker from docking in a protest over wage payments.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jun 2018 - Green Marine Technology

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