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Saturday, January 20, 2018

Passenger Ship News

Passenger Ship Evacuation Guidelines Revised

© Jenny Thompson / Adobe Stock

SOLAS Regulation II-2/13.7.4 ‘Means of escape’ currently requires escape routes on ro-ro passenger ships to be evaluated by an evacuation analysis early in the design process, and recommends the use of MSC.1/Circ.1238 when conducting the analysis. For non-ro-ro passenger ships, the guidelines are applied either on a voluntary basis or sometimes as part of the approval of alternative designs. Experience gained through evacuation analyses or accidents with passenger ships has shown that the existing voluntary guidelines do not satisfy the practical conditions of state-of-the-art passenger ships.

EU Review Includes Coasta Concordia Lessons

Safety of passenger ships – Costa Concordia accident and Commission review of safety legislation. Vice-President Siim Kallas, European Commissioner for Transport has asked that the currently ongoing review of EU passenger ship safety legislation take fully into account any lessons to be learnt from the Costa Concordia tragedy. The review will prioritise, in particular, the issues of: design and stability of passenger ships, technological developments in the sector, crew training and safe operation, including emergency evacuation procedures.

Review of Passenger Ship Safety Hastened

European Union review of passenger ship safety regulations accelerated The European Commission has invited the passenger ship industry (represented by the European Cruise Council and Interferry) to participate in a review of passenger ship safety regulations.  The review is already underway but has been accelerated by the recent Costa Concordia accident.  The European Maritime Safety Agency (EMSA) has completed two studies which analyze shortcomings of the current regulatory frameworks.  One of the major issues is the reconciliation between SOLAS 2009 and the Stockholm Agreement.

Statutory Alert: Revision to MARPOL Annex IV

New sewage discharge requirements for passenger vessels within the Baltic Sea and a new sewage treatment plant performance test/standard for all ships came into force on January 1, 2013, under MARPOL Annex IV*. These apply as follows. In general, the discharge of sewage from existing passenger ships will be prohibited within the Baltic Sea special area on or after January 1, 2018. New passenger vessels will be prohibited from discharging sewage within the Baltic Sea on or after January 1, 2016. •or regardless of the building contract signing date or keel laying date the delivery of which is on after January 1, 2018. The performance test/standard for sewage treatment plants has been updated and is detailed in section 4 of Resolution MEPC.227(64).

HAVEP: Two Passenger Vessels Detained

Preliminary results from the Harmonized Verification Program (HAVEP) on passenger ships, carried out between January 1, 2013 and December 31, 2013 in the Paris MoU region show that two passenger ships were detained over the 12 month period as a direct result of the HAVEP for deficiencies related to operation control and emergency preparedness. While the results of the HAVEP indicate reasonable overall compliance with SOLAS requirements for passenger ships, both from an operational point of view and hardware, it should be noted that in 19 out of 232 inspections (8.19%) a deficiency was recorded against a fire drill and in 20 inspections (8.62%) a deficiency was recorded against an abandon ship drill.

S. Korea, Denmark in Flag State Dialogue

Photo Courtesy Danish Maritime Authority

Six government officials from South Korea are visiting the Danish Maritime Authority and, in this connection, they exchange experiences and knowledge about shipping, inspections and safety with the Danish authorities. The South Korean government officials are, inter alia, responsible for passenger ship safety in South Korea and are visiting Europe for other reasons as well. "This is a good example of how we exchange knowledge and experience with other countries. This dialogue is an important part of our endeavours to enhance safety…

Danish Maritime Authority Launches New Ship Survey

Danish Maritime Focus on Safety

From 1 January, the Danish Maritime Authority will survey all Danish passenger ships in a new way. Shipping companies are positive towards the new passenger ship survey which will, to a greater extent, involve the crew and the daily safety work. In cooperation with a number of passenger ship companies, the Danish Maritime Authority has developed a new way of surveying passenger ships. The project has just been evaluated and the involved companies and crews have received the new survey method well.

Tirrenia Takes Rina High Speed COMFORT

Italian ferry operator Tirrenia has been awarded Rina’s COMFORT class notation for two high speed ferries. The 1,800-passenger 43 knot Scorpio, and the recently built 2,700-passenger 29 knot Bithya, have been recognized by Italian classification society RINA as compliant with COMFORT Class. The certification has been awarded to the two ships following a comprehensive series of tests carried out during normal operations at sea. Scorpio serves the Civitavecchia to Olbia route and Bithya serves the Genova to Porto Torres route. At the end of the tests, the ships have been found compliant with the noise and vibration limits established by RINA to ensure an outstanding level of passenger comfort.

Passenger ship safety recommendations agreed by IMO’s MSC

Recommended interim measures aimed at enhancing the safety of passenger ships, in the wake of the Costa Concordia incident in January, were agreed by IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), when it met at the Organization's London Headquarters for its 90th session from 16 to 25 May 2012. The MSC adopted a resolution, which invites Member States to recommend that passenger ship companies conduct a review of operational safety measures, to ships flying their flag, on a voluntary basis and “with all possible urgency and efficiency”, taking into consideration the recommended interim operational measures listed in an MSC circular. • limiting access to the bridge to those with operational or operationally related functions…

SNAME 2009: New Safe Return to Port

On the Annual Meeting of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME) Germanischer Lloyd (GL), will present a new Guideline for Safe Return to Port. The presentation by Andreas Ullrich, Dr. Daniel Povel and Dr. Urs Vogler "Safe Return to Port - Challenges Ahead for Passenger Ship Design" will give an overview about SOLAS regulations to Safe Return to Port and demonstrates influence on the design of future passenger ships. A software tool supporting the Safe Return to Port assessment is demonstrated. The new SOLAS regulations are a pro-active action of the International Maritime Organization (IMO) regarding the increasing size of passenger ships and the difficulties in safely evacuation of passengers.

EU Seeks to Improve Passenger Safety on Ships

The Commission has proposed a new package of measures to reinforce passenger safety on ships. Two proposals aim at preventing accidents such as the Express Samina’s in 2000 by increasing stability requirements for vessels and by reinforcing safety rules to cater for passengers with reduced mobility in general, and high-speed ships in particular. The Commission also presents its view on how passenger protection should be strengthened through stricter liability rules when accidents do occur. These new proposals already announced in the Commission’s new White Paper on Transport, complement a series of rules adopted in the late 1990’s following the Esotonia accident.

USCG Address Passenger Ships with Unfit Survival Craft

The US Coast Guard issued a policy letter outlining enforcement action to be taken when its inspectors find passenger ship survival craft (lifeboats or life rafts) damaged or otherwise not fit for service. While the details can get complex, the policy largely provides that the inspector should temporarily reduce the maximum passenger capacity of the ship by the capacity of the unfit survival craft if that craft can not be replaced prior to the next voyage. PCV Policy Letter 06-08 source: HK Law

After Concordia: HAVEP Report Exposes Passenger Vessel Deficiencies

-    Two passenger ships were detained over the 12 month period as a direct result of the HAVEP for deficiencies related to operation control and emergency preparedness. o     in 20 inspections (8.62%) a deficiency was recorded against an abandon ship drill. The objective of the HAVEP was to obtain a view of emergency preparedness on passenger ships following the Costa Concordia incident in January 2012. The two main areas of concern on a passenger ship are fire and flooding and if the situation escalates out of control the ship must be able to be safely abandoned. The results of the HAVEP indicate that masters and operators must pay attention to carrying out regular realistic fire and abandon ship drills…

Biometric Devices Sought for NYC Passenger Ship Terminal

Senator Charles Schumer (D-NY) sent a Letter to Asa Hutchinson, Under Secretary for Border & Transportation Security, Department of Homeland Security, recommending that biometric devices be installed at the New York City Passenger Ship Terminal. Source: HK Law

IMO Performance Standards for Passenger Ships

The IMO issued a circular providing performance standards for the systems and services to remain operational on passenger ships for safe return to port and for orderly evacuation and abandonment after a casualty. Source: HK Law

Queen Mary 2 Commences Production With First Steel Cut

Pamela Conover, Cunard Line's president and COO, will make history today when she presses the button to start the cutting of the first steel for Queen Mary 2 - the largest, longest, widest, tallest and most expensive passenger ship ever. Queen Mary 2, the first liner to be built in over three decades, will enter service in January 2004 and will be the fastest passenger ship built since QE2 entered service in 1969. Constructed by Chantiers de l'Atlantique in Saint Nazaire, France, birthplace of such famous liners as Normandie, France (now Norway) and Ile de France, the 150,000-ton QM2 is destined to become the benchmark by which all other passenger ships will be judged.

Ro-Pax Ferries Bear Excessive Reinsurance Burden Says Broker

Ro-Pax Ferry: Photo courtesy of Stena Line

Insurance broker and Maritime London member Willis believes that ro-pax ferries are bearing an unfair share of costs allocated to passenger ships within the International Group of P&I Clubs' reinsurance pool. The broker's head of global P&I, Ben Abraham, told delegates at the recent Interferry annual conference in Malta that there was a compelling argument to differentiate between pure passenger ships and ro-pax ferries, where most carrying capacity is taken up by freight, because their catastrophe risk is so different.

1988 SOLAS Protocol and MARPOL Amendments Enter Into Force

May 2000 amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), 1974 SOLAS Chapter III, regulation 28.2 for helicopter landing areas is amended to require a helicopter landing area only for ro-ro passenger ships. The requirement for a helicopter landing area was originally meant for all passenger ships of 130 metres in length and upwards constructed on or after 1 July 1999, but in May 2000 IMO's Maritime Safety Committee (MSC) decided to amend the regulation to make this requirement applicable to ro-ro passenger ships only (constructed on or after 1 July 1999). Regulation 28.1 of SOLAS chapter III requires all ro-ro passenger ships to be fitted with a helicopter pick-up area.

RINA Backs Emission Cruise Ship Project

society RINA on July 5. The project aims to provide the basis for a "safe and almost zero emission" cruise ship or ferry. Model Basin. According to Fincantieri, coordinator of the project, "SAFENVSHIP is a good example of collaboration between shipyards, owners, class societies and manufacturers. building environmental friendly and safe passenger ships at an achievable cost. and the international cruise ship industry. SAFENVSHIP, part of the Eureka R&D project, which is planned to be completed by September 2004, covers issues connected with fire and structural safety, evacuation, reduction of emissions into the air and minimization of releases to the sea. and waves on the ship stability.

Carbon-Fibre Ship Superstructure R&D: DMA Grant Funds

Denmark's DTU Mechanical Engineering , DTU Civil Engineering and DBI have received a grant of 5,090,000 Kroner from the Danish Maritime Authority Maritime Conversion Group and the Danish Maritime Fund to develop a new superstructure construction of carbon fiber and other lightweight materials for large passenger ships in the research project COMPASS. COMPASS stands for 'Composite Superstructures for Large Passenger Ships'. Associate Professor Christian Berggreen is the head of the project at DTU Mechanical Engineering and intends to demonstrate that it is possible to build a cheap and fireproof lightweight construction for superstructures on passenger ships to replace the existing steel superstructures used today.

Lifeboat, Passenger Safety, on IMO's MSC Agenda

Lifeboat photo credit IMO

The MSC is expected to adopt amendments to the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) related to lifeboat safety; continue its action plan of work on passenger ship safety, following the Costa Concordia incident; review the draft mandatory Polar Code and related draft SOLAS amendments; adopt amendments to SOLAS and other treaties to make mandatory the IMO Member State Audit Scheme; adopt a number of other important amendments; and consider items submitted by the sub-committees.

Passenger Lines Agree To Merger

Passenger shipping firm ANEK Lines reportedly has agreed to merge with Rethymniaki.

Ships in Yangtze River Aided by GPS

The Yangtze River Maritime Safety Administration started the global position system (GPS) to monitor 107 passenger ships sailing in the Three Gorges enveloped by a dense fog. It ordered the ships to stop and wait by sending short text messages after the fog became too dense for sailing. Since China's Spring Festival travel season started three days ago, 50,000 passengers have safely traveled in and out of the Three Gorges. The upper reaches of Yangtze River, China's longest, have been hit by extreme dense fogs recently. As a measure of preventing sailing accidents, maritime authorities equipped passenger ships in the river with GPS facilities free of charge. Knowing the location of each ship, the authorities can easily monitor and manage the sailing in the river.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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