Marine Link
Wednesday, July 18, 2018

Queensland News

Australia Wants to Recycle Trash from Ships

© joey333 / Adobe Stock

The Port of Hay Point in Queensland, Australia has kicked off a pilot program to investigate the feasibility of recycling garbage from international ships.Currently, ships' crews separate recyclable garbage on board, but have limited opportunity to offload these materials at Australian ports for recycling. Any garbage that is separated on board is combined when offloaded in Australian ports and has to undergo treatment by autoclave or deep-burial to meet Australia’s biosecurity requirements.

Damen Delivers Tug Pair to Smit Lamnalco

Photo: Damen

Netherlands based shipbuilder Damen said it has delivered two of four ASD 3212 tugs to towage and related marine services’ company Smit Lamnalco.Arriving in Oman on July 10, the two new tugs, each with a bollard pull of 80 metric tons, will be directly deployed at a Oman India Fertilizer Company S.A.O.C (OMIFCO) dedicated terminal in the Port of Sur and will be owned and operated by the joint venture Bahwan Lamnalco Company (BLC).In November 2017, Smit Lamnalco announced that it had decided to order four Damen ASD 3212 tugs following an award of two major contracts…

RockFLEET Approved as Only Iridium Solution for Queensland Fishing VMS

Photo: Rock Seven

The proven RockFLEET global tracking and messaging system, manufactured by UK-based Iridium satcom specialist Rock Seven, has been selected as one of four approved devices in a mandated scheme to install a Vessel Monitoring System (VMS) to all commercial fishing boats in Queensland, Australia.Under the terms of the scheme, all commercial fishing and charter boats will require a vessel tracking device to be fitted and operational by 2020. Net, crab and line boats, meanwhile, will need to have a VMS in place from January 1, 2019.

AGL Decision on LNG Import Terminal Expected in FY2019

AGL Energy Ltd, Australia's biggest power producer, expects to make a final investment decision on the country's first liquefied natural gas (LNG) import terminal in the financial year of 2019, a company official said on Friday.The A$250 million ($189 million) project will consist of a leased floating storage and regasification unit (FSRU) and jetty at Crib Point in the southeastern state of Victoria. The terminal will handle up to 130 to 140 petajoules a year, or 2.6 million tonnes of LNG, by 2020 or 2021."We are working to progress the project to a final investment decision in the financial year 2019 and are on track to do that," said Phaedra Deckart…

New Cruise Terminal for Brisbane

Image: Port of Brisbane Pty Ltd

A new international cruise terminal will be operating in Brisbane within two years after Port of Brisbane and Carnival Australia announced they had reached a commercial agreement. The Brisbane International Cruise Terminal (BICT) at Luggage Point will be operating by mid-2020 and is expected to generate almost $5 billion in economic value for the Queensland economy alone within 15 years. The amended commercial agreement between Australia’s Port of the Year, Port of Brisbane Pty Ltd (PBPL) and Australia’s leading cruise organisation…

North Korean Coal Ships Sail Home after China Denies Cargo

A fleet of North Korean cargo ships is heading home to the port of Nampo, the majority of it fully laden, after China ordered its trading companies to return coal from the isolated country, shipping data shows. Following repeated missile tests that drew international criticism, China banned all imports of North Korean coal on Feb. 26, cutting off the country's most important export product. To curb coal traffic between the two countries, China's customs department issued an official order on April 7 telling trading companies to return their North Korean coal cargoes, said three trading sources with direct knowledge of the order. U.S. President Donald Trump and Chinese President Xi Jinping were discussing North Korea at Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort on April 7.

Heavy Lift for HMAS Choules

An Australian Army 35th Water Transport Squadron LCM8 landing craft enters the well dock of amphibious ship HMAS Choules off the coast of Yeppoon in Central Queensland. Photo: Royal Australian Navy.

The Australian Defence Force's amphibious capability was on point in the recent response to Cyclone Debbie, with HMAS Choules delivering one of her largest loads of supplies to affected communities last week. Working seamlessly with Army’s 35th Water Transport Squadron LCM8 landing craft, 80 troops and 43 vehicles took more than 36 hours to offload 850 tonnes of equipment and disaster relief stores destined for Rockhampton. After an eight mile journey from the ship, nestled in the lee of the Keppel Islands to the coastal town of Yeppoon and a further 45 kilometres inland by road…

Japan Steelmakers Scramble for Coking Coal

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / (c) Lukasc Z) )

Japanese steelmakers have bought coking coal from the United States, Canada and China to replace supply lost after a cyclone closed rail links in Australia, their biggest supplier, industry and trader sources said. Still, the Japanese buyers are paying nearly double the $150 a tonnes price that they were discussing with sellers for second-quarter supply before the supply disruption. The supply talks are now on hold and prices will likely stay high until full volumes start flowing again. In 2016, Japan bought about 71 percent of the 59.9 million tonnes of coking coal it consumed from Australia.

Australia Plans to Limit LNG Exports

© Carabay / Adobe Stock

Australia's conservative government unveiled a radical plan on Thursday to restrict exports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) at times when domestic shortages push up local prices, aiming to ease soaring energy costs for local manufacturers. The plan would allow Australia's resources minister to impose controls on LNG exports on advice from the market operator and regulator, as the government seeks to cap domestic gas prices, which have become a political hot potato. "It's not a threat. This will be export controls.

Ships Combine for Moreton Anniversary

HMAS Darwin glides up the Brisbane River during a recent port visit. Photo: Royal Australian Navy.

In the middle an intense training and systems check period, HMAS Darwin slipped into the Brisbane River and berthed across from Navy’s home in southern Queensland, HMAS Moreton. The frigate’s arrival in Brisbane coincided with the first anniversary since the local base was re-commissioned. On arrival, Commanding Officer Darwin Commander Phillip Henry was met by the Commanding Officer Moreton, Commander Mark McConnell, who welcomed the ship to the city. After taking care of all the necessary ship-keeping duties…

Signs of Recovery Seen in Asian MR Market

File photo: Scorpio Tankers

A new lease of life has been breathed into the ailing Medium Range (MR) tanker market in Asia. The MR market has been mired in a slump in recent months, with TC11 rates sinking to a multi-year low of $240,000 in April on the back of lower product exports from China and South Korea. The lumpsum rate for TC11 has since rebounded by $50,000 to $290,000 due an influx of activity in North Asia. Overall Chinese product exports touched a three-month low at 3.5 mmt in April, down by 22.6 percent m-o-m and 4.9 percent y-o-y which contributed significantly to the previous decline in MR rates.

Mental Health at Sea: A Storm is Brewing

© Sebastian / Adobe Stock

According to the latest statistics, over 25 percent of people will experience a mental health problem at some point in their lives and for those working offshore, this figure is significantly and potentially dangerously higher. What’s more, the problem’s growing. So, what’s causing the rise of mental health problems within our industry and why are seafarers more likely to suffer from these issues than those working on land? Most importantly, what can be done to solve the problem and establish a happier, healthier and safer workforce on the 51,000+ merchant ships that sail our seas?

KOTUG Adds Fifth Infield Support Vessel

Coral Knight (Photo: KOTUG)

Towage operator KOTUG said it has acquired a fifth infield support vessels (ISVs) in Australia and East Timor, furthering its investment in offshore support. The new vessel, Coral Knight, will be bare boat chartered exclusively to Australian Maritime Systems Limited (AMS) to provide emergency towage services and maintain aids to the navigation network at the Great Barrier Reef for AMSA (Australian Maritime Safety Authority). KOTUG said it acquired the Coral Knight with a view to further expand its offshore support services in the Australian region.

US-Australia Naval Drill TS17 is Underway

(Front to Back) HMA Ships Bathurst and Ballarat conduct Officer of the Watch manoeuvres with USS John S. McCain during Exercise Talisman Saber 17 Field Training Exercise - North. Photo: Royal Australian Navy.

The Royal Australian and United States navies have proven a potent and agile force when operating together during the opening phases of Exercise TALISMAN SABER 17, which took place in the Northern Territory. HMA Ships Ballarat, Melbourne, Broome and Bathurst conducted four days of high-end warfare exercises with USS John S. McCain off the coast of Darwin, proving their ability to detect, track and engage surface, submarine, and air targets. Advanced air warfare serials were supported by the Royal Australian Air Force’s Classic and Super Hornets and the US Marine Corps’ F/A-18s.

'Team Damen' Unites Dutch and Australian Industry

Artist’s impression of the Damen 1800 OPV  (Photo: Damen)

Australian Maritime Systems Group is entering into a joint venture with one of Europe’s leading marine technology companies as part of a tender for Australia’s next giant defence contract. The Brisbane-based company is partnering with Dutch firm Alewijnse Marine to support the Damen Group’s bid to build the next generation of 12 Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPVs) for the Royal Australian Navy. The vessels will be mainly constructed in Adelaide and Perth, but AMSG’s involvement would generate highly-skilled and long-term electrical engineering jobs for the Queensland-based company.

MAN Engines for the Latest Riviera Luxury Yacht

The strongest version of the twin engine system for the 68 Sports Motor Yacht produces 3,800 hp (2,794 kW). (© Riviera)

Riviera 68 Sports Motor Yacht to be powered by MAN V12 engines. Australian yacht builder Riviera Yachts is equipping its new 68 and 72 Sports Motor Yacht models with V12 diesel engines from MAN Engines. Customers have the choice of the V12-1550 or V12-1800 models, as well as MAN Engines' most powerful marine engine available on the market at the moment: the V12-1900. The twin-engine systems provide 1,140 kW (1,550 hp), 1,324 kW (1,800 hp) or 1,397 kW (1,900 hp) twice-over. Riviera…

Survey Vessels Hit the Charts

HMAS Mermaid, one of four Paluma class vessels, recently completed an intensive five and a half week training program in North Queensland waters in company with her sister ship HMAS Paluma. Photo:  Royal Australian Navy

Training to ‘fight and win at sea’ occurs across the Navy every day of the year, but how does that concept map to the hydrographic fleet and their motto ‘diligence and skill’? – step into the world of the Navy’s survey motor launches. HMAS Mermaid, one of four Paluma class vessels, recently completed an intensive five and a half week training program in North Queensland waters in company with her sister ship HMAS Paluma. The ship and her 15-person crew were put through their paces by Navy’s in-house training and assessment team – Minor War Vessel Sea Training Group.

Pacific Protection Paramount in Counter Proliferation

HMAS Toowoomba departs Sydney Harbour in June 2017. Photo: Royal Australian Navy

The Australian Government is joining forces with countries from around the world to conduct Exercise PACIFIC PROTECTOR, as part of an ongoing major international commitment to prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, their delivery systems and related materials. The exercise will be held in Cairns, Queensland from 6–9 September 2017 as part of the Proliferation Security Initiative, which is an effort by 105 partner countries to build networks, tools and capabilities to counter illicit weapons of mass destruction-related trade across the globe.

Australian Supply Crunch Squeezes LNG Exporters

File Image: A typical LNG Carrier at Sea (CREDIT: MISC)

Spot LNG exports in government's cross-hairs; ConocoPhillips, Origin, Shell now in the firing line. The Australian government on Monday warned that the country's east faced a worse-than-expected natural gas shortfall in 2018, but the competition watchdog said the gap could easily be filled by diverting uncontracted exports to the local market. It is now up to the government to decide by Nov. 1 whether to pull the trigger on its Australian Domestic Gas Security Mechanism, which…

Saab's Maritime Solution Protecting Great Barrier Reef

Photo: Saab AB

As one of the wonders of the natural world, many consider the Great Barrier Reef one of the Earth’s most beautiful places. The marine environment in the area is extremely sensitive and with around 4000 commercial vessels passing every year, it is important for the vessel services operators working onshore to keep track of the traffic at all times. That’s where Saab comes in. Comprising nearly 3000 individual reefs and almost 100 islands, the Great Barrier Reef is the world’s largest coral reef system.

RAscal 1600 Mooring Launch EIMEO

Photo: Robert Allan Ltd

The Robert Allan designed RAscal 1600 mooring launch EIMEO has been completed by Cheoy Lee Shipyards in Hong Kong and is on its way to the east coast of Australia on a heavy lift ship. The launch was built for Half-Tide Marine of Mackay in Queensland, Australia who will employ it at the Dalrymple Bay Coal Terminal, south of Mackay. The terminal, one of the largest coal terminals the world, has a ship loading facility some three kilometres off the east coast suitable for up to four 200,000 dwt bulk carriers.

China, Australia Ports Clogged as Coal, Ore Demand Soars

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / (c) Lucasz Z)

Around 300 ships caught in jam that would stretch 40 miles; freight rates for biggest coal, ore carrier hit 3-yr high. More than 300 large dry cargo ships are having to wait outside Chinese and Australian ports in a maritime traffic jam that spotlights bottlenecks in China's huge and global commodity supply chain as demand peaks this winter. With some vessels waiting to load coal and iron ore outside Australian ports for over a month, key charter rates have jumped to their highest in more than three years.

Asia Dry Bulk-Capesize Rates to Fall as Cargo Dries Up

File Image (CREDIT: AdobeStock / (c) Lidian Neeleman)

Rates from Brazil to China fall by $4/tonne, $6,000/day; queues at Dalrymple Bay to ease, return to normal in January. Freight rates for large dry cargo ships on key Asian routes could slide further from multi-week lows as chartering activity thins during the holiday season and abundant tonnage for January weighs on rates, brokers said. Capesize rates from Brazil to China have dropped by $4 per tonne in the last week, equivalent to a daily earnings fall of about $6,000. Port congestion…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Jul 2018 - Marine Communications Edition

Maritime Reporter and Engineering News’ first edition was published in New York City in 1883 and became our flagship publication in 1939. It is the world’s largest audited circulation magazine serving the global maritime industry, delivering more insightful editorial and news to more industry decision makers than any other source.

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