Marine Link
Friday, January 19, 2018

Removal Convention News

IMO – Wreck Removal Convention

The IMO issued a said that the Nairobi International Convention on Removal of Wrecks, 2007 has been adopted in Kenya. The convention will provide a legal basis for coastal States to remove, or have removed, shipwrecks that may adversely affect the safety of lives, property, or the environment when located outside the territorial sea. The convention will enter into force 12 months after it has been ratified by at least ten States. Source: HK Law

SHC Will Meet in Washington

The Shipping Coordinating Committee, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, will meet in Washington, DC on April 16, 2002 to prepare for the 84th Session of the IMO Legal Committee (LEG 84). Items on the agenda include a review of the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Navigation, 1988, and the Protocol of 1988 relating to Fixed Platforms Located on the Continental Shelf. The Wreck Removal Convention will also be examined. Source: HK Law

Salvors Welcome New Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention

The world’s marine salvors have welcomed the International Maritime Organization’s adoption of a new Wreck Removal Convention (WRC). International Salvage Union (ISU) President Hans van Rooij says: “The new Convention clarifies many issues of importance to Coastal States and salvors. Times have changed and the main motivation for wreck removal today is often concern for the environment, rather than any threat to safety of navigation. The new convention defines a wreck-related hazard as a “danger or impediment to navigation” or a condition or threat that “may reasonably be expected to result in major harmful consequences to the marine environment…

New Marine Pollution Instrument

Photo: IMO

The Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks, which entered into force internationally in April this year, provides another tool in the armory of global treaties adopted by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) which are intended to help prevent pollution from ships and minimize any damage caused. IMO’s Jan De Boer gave a presentation on the “Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention: A new marine pollution instrument” at a seminar on marine pollution in London (June 25) organized by Lloyd’s Maritime Academy.

Nairobi: Understanding Wreck Removal

Photo: International Maritime Organization (IMO)

A meeting of salvage and wreck professionals in London, United Kingdom has been introduced to International Maritime Organization (IMO)'s Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention. The treaty provides the legal basis for States to remove, or have removed, shipwrecks that may threaten the safety of lives, goods and property at sea, as well as the marine environment. IMO’s Jan De Boer outlined the Convention’s key provisions in a session on “Operating within guidelines, conventions and authorities’ requirements” at the 19th Salvage & Wreck Removal Conference (7-9 December).

Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention Explained

Photo: International Maritime Organization

The International Maritime Organization (IMO)  treaty covering wreck removal is on the agenda at the 7th Maritime Salvage and Casualty Response Conference in London (7-8 September). IMO’s Jan de Boer gave an insight into the Organization’s Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention, which provides the legal basis for States to remove, or have removed, shipwrecks that may threaten the safety of navigation, the marine environment as well as the coastline or related interests. The treaty also…

Palau Reports Increase in WRC Applications

Palau International Ship Registry (PISR) has received a high volume of applications from owners looking to have the correct documentation in place prior to the imminent entry into force of the Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention. Marisabel Arauz Park, Palau International Ship Registry’s technical manager, said, “The high number of applications from owners wanting to be compliant before the convention’s entry into force on April 14 is indicative of the shipowning community’s increasing confidence in Palau as a reliable, responsible flag. “Although we are a relatively new register, our fleet is expanding rapidly and we now have regional offices in 15 countries…

Limitless Salvage

Dennis Bryant

Whether driven by treasure hunting or environmental protection, the days of forgotten wrecks, even at great depths, is past. It seems like every month we see reports of long-lost maritime wrecks being discovered on the ocean bottom and treasures being salvaged from great depths. We also hear regularly of oil being recovered from sunken wrecks. There is now no practical limit to the ability to recover objects from the sea floor, regardless of depth, currents, weather, or other obstacles. The only existing obstacle seems to be financing - and costs are decreasing regularly.

Wreck Removal Convention: Key Issues Remain Unresolved

New developments in wreck removal and the ever-increasing size of ships provided the focus for the International Salvage Union’s London conference on March 7. Looking at the prospects for a new Wreck Removal Convention, the Institute of Maritime Law’s Richard Shaw warned that adoption of the draft at the May diplomatic conference in Nairobi was not a foregone conclusion. Richard Shaw said that the new Convention, if adopted, would provide comfort to harbormasters and shore authorities asked to provide refuge for marine casualties. He added that the convention provides freedom to contract. A Coastal State may not impose a particular salvor on an owner.

Netherlands Signs Wreck Removal Convention

The Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention was adopted in May 2007 and will provide the legal basis for States to remove, or have removed, shipwrecks that may have the potential to affect adversely the safety of lives, goods and property at sea, as well as the marine environment. The Convention is open for signature until 18 November 2008 and, thereafter, will be open for ratification, accession or acceptance. It will enter into force twelve months following the date on which ten States have either signed it without reservation as to ratification, acceptance or approval or have deposited instruments of ratification, acceptance, approval or accession with IMO. The Ambassador of The Netherlands to the , His Excellency Mr. P. W.

Denmark's Signature Enables Wreck Removal Convention

File image

Denmark is the tenth country to accede to the Wreck Removal Convention which means that it will take effect on 14 April 2015. The Danish Maritime Authority informs that a minimum of ten countries must accede to a convention in order to put it in force. The most important new provision of the Convention is that it ensures improved possibilities of having the expenses incurred in connection with the removal of wrecks covered on the ship owner’s account. Thus, the risk of the public sector having to pay is reduced.

Liberia Joins Nairobi Wreck Removal Convention

Image courtesy of the Liberian Registry

Liberia acceded to the Nairobi International Wreck Convention on the Removal of Wrecks, 2007, on January 8, 2015, and thus becomes the largest flag state party to the convention. The Nairobi Convention covers shipwrecks that could have a potential adverse effect on the safety of lives and property at sea, as well as the marine environment. When it enters into force on April 14, 2015, it will fill a gap in the existing international legal framework by providing the first set of uniform international rules aimed at ensuring the prompt and effective removal of wrecks.

Shipping Coordinating Committee Meetings Scheduled for DC

The Shipping Coordinating Committee, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, will hold two meetings in Washington, DC. The first meeting (on February 8) is to prepare for the 48th session of the IMO Subcommittee on Ship Design and Equipment (DE). Topics on the agenda include longitudinal strength of tankers; large passenger ship safety; measures to prevent accidents with lifeboats; and protection of fuel tanks. The second meeting (on April 12) is to prepare for the 90th session of the IMO Legal Committee (LEG). Topics on the agenda include the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation; the draft Wreck Removal Convention; and the Provision of Financial Security. Source: HK Law

SCC Meetings

The Shipping Coordinating Committee, sponsored by the U.S. Department of State, will hold two meetings in Washington, DC. The first meeting (on February 8) is to prepare for the 48th session of the IMO Subcommittee on Ship Design and Equipment (DE). Topics on the agenda include longitudinal strength of tankers; large passenger ship safety; measures to prevent accidents with lifeboats; and protection of fuel tanks. The second meeting (on April 12) is to prepare for the 90th session of the IMO Legal Committee (LEG). Topics on the agenda include the Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Maritime Navigation; the draft Wreck Removal Convention; and the Provision of Financial Security. 70 Fed. Reg. 2450 (HK Law)

Wreck Removal Treaty Comes into Force in Singapore

Photo: Gard

Skuld Singapore  has reminded all members that Singapore has ratified the Wreck Removal Convention (WRC) which entered into force in Singapore on 8 September 2017. "As members will be aware, the WRC requires among other matters owners of ships over 300 GT to have in place insurance to cover the costs of wreck removal. Skuld, like all the clubs within the International Group, has appropriate wreck removal cover available to their members," said a statement from the international mutual marine insurance company.

IMO – Summary of 24th Assembly

The IMO issued a News Release summarizing the recently concluded 24th Assembly. A resolution was adopted for a voluntary scheme for members to audit their administration and enforcement of IMO provisions. A resolution was adopted calling for the issue of piracy and armed robbery against ships in waters off the coast of Somalia to be brought to the attention of the United Nations Security Council. A resolution was adopted urging all States to respect the basic human rights of seafarers involved in maritime accidents. The Assembly agreed that the IMO should adopt a new legally-binding instrument on ship recycling. The Assembly tentatively agreed to hold a Conference in Nairobi, Kenya during 2007 to adopt a new Wreck Removal Convention. Source: HK Law

Liberia Leads on Wreck Removal Certification

Image courtesy of Liberian Registry

The Liberian Registry said delivery of Wreck Removal Convention certificates is now faster and more convenient for shipowners following the launch if its new online application system. The system was set up to expedite shipowners’ compliance with the requirements of the Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks 2007 (WRC), which comes into force on April 14, 2015, requiring owners of vessels of 300 gt and above to carry a certificate as evidence of compliance that insurance or financial security is in place to cover their liability under the convention.

IMO: Suppression of Unlawful Acts at Sea

IMO will consider proposed amendments to expand the scope and effectiveness of regulations concerning the prosecution and extradition of those engaged in the perpetration of unlawful acts at sea during the 85th session of the Organization's Legal Committee (IMO Headquarters, London, October 22 - 24 ). The Committee will review the text of draft proposed amendments to the 1988 Convention for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts Against the Safety of Maritime Navigation (SUA Convention) and its related Protocol for the Suppression of Unlawful Acts against the Safety of Fixed Platforms Located on the Continental Shelf, 1988. In particular, the proposed amendments…

Asbestos: Maritime’s Ticking Time Bomb

(Photo: Lucion Marine)

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) should amend regulations banning the use of asbestos and asbestos containing materials (ACM) in ships, says John Chillingworth, senior marine principal at Lucion Marine. Regulations under the International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) state that if asbestos is found onboard a ship built after July 2002 then the vessel’s flag registry, in conjunction with its classification society, issues a non-extendable exemption certificate, providing the owner with a three-year window in which to remove the asbestos.

EC Notes Safety Progress, Highlights Needed Improvement

Some EU Member States are struggling to meet their commitment to ratify international maritime conventions, according to a European Commission report (EC) on compliance with flag state requirements. Vice-President Siim Kallas, EU transport commissioner, said, "I am heartened that most coastal Member States are taking their obligations seriously as flag states. Current EU rules promote maritime safety and set a high standard for EU flag states by requiring them to undergo a peer review of their maritime administration and develop and implement a certified quality management system for their operations. Portugal, Ireland and all landlocked flag states except Luxembourg have failed to do so.

Cook Islands to Issue Wreck Removal Certificates

Glenn Armstrong, Managing Director of Maritime Cook Islands, the Cook Islands registry administrator. Courtesy MCI

The Cook Islands has acceded to the Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks, 2007 (“The Nairobi Convention”). As a State Party, Cook Islands will issue Wreck Removal Certificates to its own ships and also to ships flying the flags of states that have not yet become party to the Nairobi Convention. The Nairobi Convention, which will come  into force on 14 April 2015, requires all ships over 300 GT (including fishing vessels and commercial yachts) to have insurance in place to cover the location…

Shipowners to Become Liable for Costs of Wreck Removal

Wreck image courtesy of IMO

Shipowner liability is on the horizon as the Nairobi International Convention on the Removal Wrecks will enter into force on 14 April 2015 following the deposit, on 14 April 2014, of an instrument of ratification by Denmark, with the International Maritime Organization (IMO). Among several provisions, the Convention will place financial responsibility for the removal of certain hazardous wrecks on shipowners, making insurance, or some other form of financial security, compulsory.

Nairobi International Convention on the Removal of Wrecks

A new international convention on wreck removal has been adopted in Kenya. and property at sea, as well as the marine environment. President of Kenya, the Honourable Mwai Kibaki. territorial sea. including their territorial sea. coastal States and shipping in general have, if anything, become more acute. involved in the marking and removal of hazardous wrecks. attempts to resolve all of these and other, related, issues.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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