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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Reserve Fleet News

MarAd To Recycle Three More Ships

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration has signed contracts totaling $1,136,106 for the recycling of three obsolete ships from its reserve fleets. All three ships will be recycled at the Esco Marine facility in Brownsville, Texas. Two of the ships, Cape Catoche and Cape Carthage, are in the James River Reserve Fleet site at Fort Eustis in Virginia. When they depart the James River site for recycling, they will be the 68th and 69th ships to do so since January of 2001. The third ship, Del Viento, is in the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Texas. The Maritime Administration keeps ships in three National Defense Reserve Fleet sites to support Armed Forces movements and to respond to national emergencies.

MARAD Recycles 3 More Ships

The U. S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration has signed fee-for-service contracts to recycle three more of its obsolete ships. Two ships, the Hattiesburg Victory and the Pioneer Contractor, are from the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Texas, and one, the oiler Savannah, is from the James River Reserve Fleet in Virginia. The Maritime Administration has moved 118 ships out of its National Defense Reserve Fleet sites since 2001. With the contracts announced today, there are only 24 ships left in the James River waiting to be disposed of and without disposal contracts, and 10 such ships in the Beaumont site. The Hattiesburg Victory is one of the few remaining Victory ships built during World War II to carry cargo needed by U.S. forces all over the world.

Adonis Sells for More Than $1m

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration has sold a ship from the Beaumont Reserve Fleet for more than $1million, the first time under the current program that a ship has brought such a price. International Shipbreaking, Ltd., in , , will pay $1,151,727 for the ship Adonis, now moored at the Beaumont Reserve Fleet site in . Three other government-owned, obsolete ships are also being sold to the company for an additional $173,297: the , the and the Buyer. These sales stand in contrast to most ship disposal contracts in recent years, which have involved the federal government paying to have its obsolete ships recycled.

Chesapeake Firm to Recycle Ships

Two government ships, currently moored at a shipyard near Baltimore, Md., will be recycled at the Bay Bridge Enterprises facility in Chesapeake, Va., under the terms of contracts announced today by the Maritime Administration. Both are World War II-era ships, formerly anchored in the James River Reserve Fleet in Newport News, Va. Bay Bridge will receive $95,000 to dismantle the Hoist, and $695,000 to dismantle the Sphinx. Both ships were originally awarded to North American Ship Recycling, Inc. Those contracts were terminated by the Maritime Administration after notification by North American Ship Recycling, Inc. that the company had terminated all operations at the Sparrows Point Shipyard.

MarAd Moves Ahead on Ship Disposal

The Maritime Administration (MARAD) announced four new disposal contracts for obsolete ships in its National Defense Reserve Fleet. Two of the ships are in the James River Reserve Fleet in Virginia, and two are in the Suisun Bay near San Francisco, CA. Three of the ships will be dismantled in Brownsville, TX, and one in Chesapeake, VA. “Our ship disposal policy of ‘worst first’ has worked for us,” said Deputy Maritime Administrator John Jamian. “We have cleared out the ships in the worst condition, most of which were in the James River. The Santa Lucia, a 1966-vintage cargo ship, currently in the James River site, will be towed to the Marine Metal facility in Brownsville…

News: More Ghost Fleet Ships Contracted for Scrap

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MarAd) recently awarded a contract for the disposal of obsolete ships in the James River Reserve Fleet. Post-Service Remediation Partners (PRP) of New York will be awarded a payment of $14.8 million to remove a total of 15 ships from the James River Reserve Fleet. This is the largest removal of obsolete ships in a single year from the National Defense Reserve Fleet since 1993. "As stewards of the environment, the responsible disposal of obsolete ships is a high priority for the Department of Transportation," said U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta. The PRP award was the result of a negotiated Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) proposal that offered the removal of fifteen ships.

More Ships Depart Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet

Two obsolete vessels, the Reclaimer and Sagamore, are scheduled to be towed from the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet on Monday, May 16, 2011. The departures mark the 20th and 21st ships to leave the National Defense Reserve Fleet since October 2009, when the Obama Administration announced its commitment to clean up the site and improve the surrounding environment. As a result, the U.S. Maritime Administration is more than four months ahead of schedule in removing obsolete U.S. ships from the Reserve Fleet. Further, the vessels Bolsterand Clamp are currently scheduled for departure from the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet on Monday, May 23, 2011. The disposal schedule calls for 20 ships to be removed from SBRF by September 30, 2011.

More Ghost Fleet Vessels to be Removed

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) today announced a contract award for the disposal of obsolete ships in the James River Reserve Fleet. Post-Service Remediation Partners (PRP) of New York will be awarded a payment of $14.8 million to remove a total of 15 ships from the James River Reserve Fleet. This is the largest removal of obsolete ships in a single year from the National Defense Reserve Fleet since 1993. "As stewards of the environment, the responsible disposal of obsolete ships is a high priority for the Department of Transportation," said U.S. Secretary of Transportation Norman Y. Mineta. The PRP award was the result of a negotiated Program Research and Development Announcement (PRDA) proposal that offered the removal of fifteen ships.

Two More Ships to Depart Suisun Bay Fleet

The departures mark the 22nd and 23rd ships to leave the National Defense Reserve Fleet since October 2009, when the Obama Administration announced its commitment to clean up the site and improve the surrounding environment. As a result, the U.S. Maritime Administration is more than four months ahead of schedule in removing obsolete U.S. ships from the Reserve Fleet. The disposal schedule calls for 20 ships to be removed from SBRF by September 30, 2011. The Bolster, formerly the USS Bolster (ARS-38)…

Environmental Assessment for National Defense Reserve Fleet Sites

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration is asking for public comment on its Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment for the admittance, maintenance and disposal of vessels at the National Defense Reserve Fleet sites it operates. The Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment can be viewed at http://www.regulations.gov for the next 45 days. The Draft Programmatic Environmental Assessment includes options for cleaning and maintaining ships, and for setting standards for the condition of ships that enter the fleet in the future. The Maritime Administration currently has 244 ships in the National Defense Reserve Fleet to support Armed Forces movements and to respond to national emergencies.

Plan to Clean Up Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet

U.S. Transportation Deputy Secretary John D. Porcari announced that the Department’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) will begin to clean up and recycle obsolete vessels at the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet (SBRF). MARAD has awarded the first contracts for the removal and recycling of two WWII-era cargo ships currently moored in Suisun Bay, Calif. – the first ships to be disposed from the fleet since January 2007. “The Obama Administration is committed to good environmental stewardship, and these deteriorating vessels pose a risk to the marine ecosystem in Suisun Bay,” said Deputy Secretary Porcari. “We can maintain our national defense sealift assets at the Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet with a much smaller footprint on the surrounding environment.

North American Ship Recycling Buys James River Ship

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration (MarAd) announced that North American Ship Recycling is buying the World War II-era vessel Hoist for $61,000. The ship will soon be leaving the James River, headed for the firm’s facility at Sparrows Point, near Baltimore, Md. When the Hoist departs, it will be the 60th ship to depart the James River fleet since January 2001. The Hoist, a Navy rescue and salvage ship built in 1945, served with distinction for 49 years, and entered the James River Reserve Fleet in 1994. In 1964 and again in 1966 it participated in significant undersea searches: first for the lost attack submarine USS Thresher, and later for the recovery of a hydrogen bomb lost off Palomares, Spain after the crash of a B-52 bomber.

DOT Sells Two More Ships for Recycling

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration has sold two ships for recycling to Esco Ltd. of Brownsville, Texas for a total of $171,452. Resolute, a partial container/breakbulk ship built in 1980, brought a purchase price of $90,726. Resolute is currently moored at the James River Reserve Fleet site in Newport News, Va. Gulf Farmer, a breakbulk cargo ship built in 1964, brought a purchase price of $80,726. Gulf Farmer is at the Beaumont Reserve Fleet site in Texas. Both ships, which are to leave their respective fleet sites within 30 days, are to be recycled, which is the most common method of ship disposal used by the Maritime Administration. When a ship is recycled the recycler often salvages and sells metal and other materials.

Ohio to Depart Beaumont Reserve Fleet

The combination container vessel SS Ohio is scheduled to depart the Beaumont Reserve Fleet on Tuesday, April 19, 2011. The vessel was recently sold for recycling to ESCO Marine, Inc. and its departure will reduce the number of non-retention vessels awaiting disposal from the Beaumont Reserve Fleet to eight. The Ohio was built in 1967 as a combination railway car/container-carrying vessel for Seatrain Lines, Inc. of New York. Named Seatrain Ohio, the vessel was constructed by recombining modified sections from three WWII T2 class tankers. The ship was the last of seven such converted vessels that were fitted with tracks and other special equipment so that railcars could move directly from the docks into the ship’ holds. The ship spent its active career on charter to the U.S.

MarAd to Remove Remaining High Priority Vessels from James River Fleet

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration said that it has made arrangements to remove the last of several high-priority vessels from the James River Reserve Fleet. The agency has awarded five ship-disposal contracts worth a total of $2,161,610 to North American Ship Recycling of Sparrows Point, Md. The departure of Cape Charles, Pride, Scan, Southern Cross, and Sphinx will bring the number of ships leaving the James River to 66 since January 2001. The Sphinx, a cable-layer built in Japan in 1944, is the only World War II-era ship in this group of five. The condition of the Sphinx made it a high-priority ship for the Maritime Administration for several years, but disposal was delayed while charitable groups tried to raise money to save it.

U.S. DOT Recycles Two More JRRF Ships

The U. S. Department of Transportation’s Maritime Administration has awarded contracts to recycle two more of the obsolete government-owned ships, which are currently moored in the James River Reserve Fleet (JRRF) in Virginia. The two ships being recycled are the Escape and the Cape Cod. These two vessels will be the 83rd and 84th ships to leave the JRRF since 2001. The Escape (ARS-6) was built as a Navy rescue ship in 1942 by Basalt Rock Co. in Napa, Calif. The vessel supported the nation's "Mercury" manned spaceflight program in the early 1960s. The Escape will be recycled at Bay Bridge Enterprises, LLC, of Chesapeake, Va., at a cost to the federal government of $115,200. The Cape Cod (AK-5041) was built as a break-bulk cargo ship in 1962 by Bethlehem Steel in Sparrows Point, Md.

MarAd Sells Tanker to New Orleans Firm

The Maritime Administration announced that it has sold the obsolete vessel Lexington for to Southern Scrap Material Corporation of New Orleans, La. The vessel, a tanker, was built in 1958 and is currently located in the Beaumont Reserve Fleet in Texas. Steel and other materials from the ship will be recycled. Southern Scrap Material purchased two other vessels from the Maritime Administration in May. “This is a good bargain for the American taxpayer and helps create jobs in New Orleans,” said Maritime Administrator Sean Connaughton. The Maritime Administration keeps ships in the National Defense Reserve Fleet sites to support Armed Forces movements and to respond to national emergencies.

Yellowstone to Depart James River Reserve Fleet

USS Yellowstone (Photo: National Parks Service, U.S. Dept. of Interior)

On Tuesday, December 16, 2014, the USS Yellowstone - a National Defense Reserve Fleet non-retention vessel is scheduled to depart the James River Reserve Fleet in Fort Eustis, Virginia for recycling at ESCO Marine, Inc. in Brownsville, Texas.    The Yellowstone, a former U.S. Navy tender (AD-41), was built by NASSCO Shipyard in San Diego, California and commissioned in 1980. The vessel supported operations during Desert Shield and Desert Storm before the U.S. Navy decommissioned the vessel in 1996.  

Vessel Departs James River Reserve Fleet

The Ortolan departed the James River Reserve Fleet at 9:50 a.m. on July 20 in transit to Esco Marine, Inc., in Brownsville, Texas for recycling.  The approximate travel time to Texas is 14 days.  The Ortolan is the 80th ship to leave the James River Reserve Fleet since January 1, 2001.

Last Liberty Ship Departs James River Reserve Fleet

The Arthur M. Huddell  was towed from the James River Reserve Fleet on July 8. It will be the 72nd  ship to depart the site since January of 2001.  The Huddell is the last of the ships in the National Defense Reserve Fleet.  The Huddell is being towed to the W3 Marine facility in , where preparations will be made to transfer it to .  Greek authorities plan to make it into a museum.

Ship Departs Reserve Fleet for Dismantling in Texas

The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD) issued a Press Release stating that another ship has been towed from the reserve fleet for dismantling in Texas. Source: HK Law

Obsolete US Ship Recycling Target Surpassed

U.S. Transportation Secretary visits Suisun Bay in Northern California to celebrate surpassing administration's goal for recycling. Ray LaHood, US Transportation Secretary visited Shuisun Bay for the occasion. In 2010, the Department’s Maritime Administration (MARAD) committed to removing 28 ships from the fleet by September 30, 2012. To date, MARAD has removed 36 ships, with three more vessels scheduled for removal by the end of the year. “Three years ago, the Department of Transportation promised to get rid of the ships that posed a threat to the environment, and I am proud to announce today that we are delivering on that promise,” said Secretary LaHood.

Ghost Fleet Ship to Become Artificial Reef

It has been a troop carrier, a missile-tracking ship, and a starred in a Hollywood movie. Now the General Hoyt S. Vandenberg will become an artificial reef off Key West, Fla. Maritime Administrator Sean T. Connaughton approved the transfer of the Vandenberg to the state of Florida, which plans to turn the 63-year old vessel into an artificial reef later this year. “Reefing is an excellent way to dispose of our obsolete ships,” said Connaughton. "It is good for the economy, good for the environment, and a great deal for U.S. The approval clears the way for the ship to be cleaned and sunk for a reef. The Vandenberg will join other ships of the Maritime Administration’s National Defense Reserve Fleet being used in the Maritime Administration's Artificial Reefing Program: the Texas Clipper I…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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