Marine Link
Sunday, January 21, 2018

Safety Alert News

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert following a recent fireon a product tanker. The Safety Alert recommends that personnel ensure the proper maintenance and repair of fuel and exhaust systems associated with main propulsion and diesel-driven auxiliaries onboard their vessels. The engines should be maintained as designed, except for authorized modifications. Insulation of potential fuel oil ignition sources and use of specialized fasteners and other devices to reduce the loosening of critical engine and systems components is essential.

Safety Alert: Lifejacket Snap Hooks

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert stating that the spring clips installed on some USCG-approved lifejacket snap hooks may be defective. The Type I personal floatation devices were manufactured by Cal-June, Inc., aka Jim Buoy. The Safety Alert lists the models and lot numbers of the involved items. The manufacturer has agreed to replace all defective snap hooks. (HK Law).

BSEE: Safety Alert on the Deepwater Horizon Explosion and Spill

The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) today issued a Safety Alert relating to the Macondo well blowout. The Safety Alert was distributed to oil and gas leaseholders and contractors working on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). It  briefly summarizes the findings of the Joint Investigation of the Deepwater Horizon explosion and oil spill, and highlights recommendations for immediate action that leaseholders and contractors can incorporate into their work. ”We must ensure that the lessons learned from the investigation of the Deepwater Horizon explosion and oil spill are widely disseminated and used to enhance the safety practices used by offshore oil and gas operators and contractors in their day-to-day activities,” said BSEE Director Michael R. Bromwich.

Safety Alert – USCG Rescue Coordination Center Alameda

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert stating that, effective November 13, the e-mail address for USCG Rescue Coordination Center Alameda changed from rccalameda@d11.uscg.mil to the new domain address of rccalameda@uscg.mil . All Ship Security Alert System (SSAS) units utilizing e-mail notification functions should be updated to reflect this change. Source: HK Law

BSEE Issues Safety Alert

Recommends Safe Practices to Prevent Falls. The Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) today issued recommendations for safety measures developed from the investigation of an offshore accident which resulted in a fatality. The recommendations are being distributed through a Safety Alert: the safety alert is one of the tools BSEE uses to inform the offshore oil and gas industry of the circumstances surrounding an incident or a near miss. The alert also contains recommendations that should help prevent the recurrence of such an incident on the Outer Continental Shelf.

Safety Alert: Loss of INMARSAT C Safety Messages

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert reporting that users of INMARSAT C ship earth stations risk losing messages if the printer is not connected to and maintained with the INMARSAT C terminal or if floppy drive maintenance is not regularly performed on the terminal. Additionally, certain non-GMDSS-approved software (e.g., Windows-based software) may freeze up if this maintenance is not performed. (HK Law).

Compatibility of CO2 Extinguisher Components

Figure 1: The obsolete diffuser on the right is cast differently than diffusers used today.  Note the longer neck and placement of diffuser holes.  The newer diffuser on the left is compatible with standard discharge hoses and has a shorter neck to allow it to properly seat when the hose is connected.  See Figure 3 for how to determine if you have a CO2 extinguisher fitted with an obsolete diffuser that may be incompatible with standard industry discharge hoses.

A recent marine casualty investigation of a shipboard fire onboard a U.S. flagged vessel in the Hampton Roads Captain of the Port (COTP) zone raised serious concerns with regards to carbon dioxide (CO2) fire extinguisher servicing. During shipboard fire-fighting operations a crewmember attempted to fight a fire using a 15lb CO2 extinguisher, but the extinguisher failed to properly discharge and only seeped from the neck of the extinguisher. The fire was eventually extinguished by another crewmember using a dry-chemical fire extinguisher. Following this shipboard fire, U.S.

Safety Alert – PROSAR Technologies

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert advising that it has discovered defective lifejacket lights made by PROSAR Technologies. It has also learned that PROSAR Technologies is no longer in business. The Coast Guard is canceling all approvals for PROSAR Technologies lifesaving equipment because quality control cannot be verified. PROSAR Technology equipment currently in use should be replaced as soon as practicable with approved equipment. (HK Law).

Safety Alert for Rescue Boat Fasteners

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert stating that the lifting frame of a rigid hull inflatable (RHI) rescue boat separated from the brackets that attached it to the deck of a vessel. Investigation revealed that the nuts securing the bolts fastening the lifting frame to the deck had backed off due to vibration. This condition was not readily apparent on routine visual examination. The Coast Guard recommends that those with similar arrangements make careful inspections and authorized modifications, such as installing cotter pins. (HK Law)

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The U.S. Coast Guard Office of Investigations and Analysis issued a Safety Alert stating that certain “Strike First” fire extinguishers are being recalled. The fire extinguishers are the 2.5 and 5 pound dry chemical type. The valve stem seats on a number of these assembled between December 2002 and February 2004 may prevent the extinguisher from discharging properly when the lever is activated. Retro-fit kits are available free of charge from the manufacturer. Source: HK Law

Safety Alert – Lifeboat gripes

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert reporting problems that have been experienced with lifeboat gripes on certain totally enclosed lifeboats. On some lifeboats, the ring on the released end of the gripe is larger than the gripe bollard or sternpost on the lifeboat. This may allow the ring to snag on the gripe bollard, causing the lifeboat to fall in an uncontrolled manner. Owners, operators, and masters should check their lifeboat arrangements and contact their lifeboat manufacturer and classification society immediately if the condition exists. (HK Law)

Safety Alert - The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide Exposure

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert warning mariners of dangers posed by exposure to carbon monoxide. Carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless gas produced as a by-product of diesel and gasoline engines and can accumulate quickly in confined spaces. Mariners are urged to ensure that exhaust systems on diesel and gasoline engines are properly vented away from accommodation, working, and recreational areas on vessels. (7/9/03). Source: HK Law

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The US Coast Guard Office of Investigations and Analysis issued a Safety Alert advising that certain emergency escape hoods manufactured by Brookdale International Systems, Inc. are being voluntarily recalled by that company. Even though such devices are not Coast Guard approved, they are carried on some vessels. Companies that have such devices on their ships should contact the manufacturer at http://www.evacsafety.com to determine whether your particular item is subject to the recall. source: HK Law

Safety Alert: EPIRB Antenna Failure

The U.S. Coast Guard has issued a Safety Alert reporting that a high percentage of antennas attached to Satellite 406 Category I EPIRBs, product number 2754, manufactured by ACR Electronics, Inc. have failed. The company will replace damaged antennas at no cost. The Coast Guard strongly recommends that vessel operators carefully examine their EPIRB antennas, particularly those manufactured by ACR Electronics. Source: HK Law

High Pressure CO2 Fire Extinguisher Alert

The US Coast Guard issued a safety alert advising of a potential problem involving certain ANSUL – High Pressure Carbon Dioxide Fire Extinguishing Systems. There have been several instances where this system has discharged without human intervention. The manufacturer has identified the suspect CO2 cylinder valves as those having a date code between 10-07 and 06- 08. Owners, operators, and masters of ships having such ANSUL systems should immediately check the dates on the CO2 cylinder valves and notify ANSUL if the date code is within the suspect range. Safety Alert 05-09 (7/21/09). (Source: Bryant’s Maritime News)

Pacific Drilling Keeps on Drilling

None of Pacific Drillings ultra-deepwater drillships are affected by a recent BSEE safety alert. Concerning the recent U.S. Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE) safety alert regarding GE connectors and bolts, the company reports that none of Pacific Drilling’s rigs are covered by the directive to suspend operations. However, Pacific Drilling is proactively inspecting the Vetco ExF H-4 LMRP connector bolts on each of its rigs as operations allow. The company has the necessary spare bolts to address any issues detected during inspection. Currently, all of the company’s rigs are operating normally, and no direct revenue implications are expected as a result of this directive.

Marine Safety Alert – propulsion boiler casings

The US Coast Guard issued a Marine Safety Alert advising owners and operators of steam-propelled ships to have their engineering staffs assess the structural integrity of their boiler casings; paying particular attention to support structure interfaces in the steam drum, front-to-side casing attachments, and upper-to-lower casing transitions. It is also recommended that a thorough review of previous casing repairs be conducted to identify signs of diminished structural integrity. A bulk cargo vessel recently suffered a boiler tube rupture resulting in a boiler casing failure which injured two crewmembers. (HK Law)

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert stating that a chemical tanker recently suffered a tank explosion in the Gulf of Mexico near Galveston. After stripping a tank, the tankerman opened the tank top cover and an explosion ensued, injuring the tankerman and damaging the vessel. While the investigation is ongoing, the cause appears to be that the bearings in the cargo pump failed, allowing the shaft and impeller to shift and spin against the casing. The friction caused extreme heat and possible sparks, which ignited the atmosphere in the tank. Owners and operators are advised to ensure proper maintenance of cargo pumps. Source: HK Law

CG Issues Safety Alert for Faulty Liferaft

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert stating that servicing of some inflatable liferafts by AMPAK facilities in Baton Rouge (Louisiana) and Panama City (Florida) may not have been proper. Work has been found in some instances to be improper and tests in some instances were not actually performed. The AMPAK facilities were not authorized by the U.S. Coast Guard to service liferafts. The AMPAK facilities have apparently ceased operations. Inflatable liferafts serviced at these AMPAK facilities should be taken to an approved servicing facility as soon as possible. If possible, the U.S. Coast Guard should be notified as it would like to witness the servicing.

Safety Alert: Floating Electric Waterlights

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert reporting various problems with floating electric waterlights. Sometimes replacement batteries are used that are too heavy, causing the lights to sink. Other times, the batteries are not installed properly or the flotation foam is misplaced. A bracket is sometimes used that is not designed for that particular light, with the result that the light may not properly release. Lanyards may deteriorate due to sun damage. Floating electric waterlights should be examined to ensure proper operation when needed. Source: HK Law

Safety Alert – confined space entry

The U.S. Coast Guard issued a Safety Alert reporting that the second engineer on a foreign vessel died after he became accidentally trapped in the main propulsion engine’s scavenging air receiver. While the ship was in port, he had apparently entered the space to check on recent repairs and became trapped when the door closed and one of the dogs dropped into place. He failed to tell anyone of his plans and failed to have anyone standing by to provide assistance. Mariners are reminded that a confined space is any location that, by design, has limited openings for entry or egress and is not intended for continuous human occupancy. (HK Law)

USCG Issues Safety Alert

The U.S. Coast Guard has issued a Safety Alert reporting that the Ikaros model Mark II Man-Overboard Smoke Signal may explode if the igniter mechanism is reinserted after ignition has commenced. The device is designed to automatically ignite when pulled from its bracket. It is used with a number of ring lifebuoys and is generally detached when the lifebuoy is deployed. Owners and operators should consider replacing the model Mark II with the new model Mark III, which includes a pressure relief mechanism to prevent explosion due to pressure build-up. In the meantime, owners and operators are encouraged to install warning placards advising crewmembers to not return the smoke signal to its bracket following ignition. Source: HK Law

SAFETY ALERT – Inflatable lifejackets

SAFETY ALERT – Inflatable lifejackets equipped with Hammar Hydrostatic Inflator manufactured before 2006. This Safety Alert was recently distributed to shipping authorities and advertised in the trade press, boating magazines and digital media worldwide. The Hammar Hydrostatic Inflator is attached to the lifejacket with a sealing ring. In 2006, CM Hammar upgraded the sealing ring with new state of the art raw materials, to eliminate potential defects and increase long term durability. A small number of sealing rings manufactured before 2006 have suffered premature material degradation, most likely after being exposed to extreme environmental conditions.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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