Marine Link
Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Water Exchange News

Advice on Ballast Water Exchange Ops

The IMO issued a Circular providing precautionary advice to masters when undertaking ballast water exchange operations. The Circular provides recommendations relating to possible problems with bridge visibility standards, propeller immersion, and minimum draft forward that may arise during high seas ballast water exchange. MSC Circ. 1145 (HK Law)

Advice on Ballast Water Exchange Ops

The IMO issued a Circular providing precautionary advice to masters when undertaking ballast water exchange operations. The Circular provides recommendations relating to possible problems with bridge visibility standards, propeller immersion, and minimum draft forward that may arise during high seas ballast water exchange. MSC Circ. 1145 (HK Law)

Australia’s New Ballast Water Management Requirements

Image: Plymouth Marine Laboratory

The Australian government has announced via the International Maritime Organization (IMO) that from June 16, 2016, new requirements for ships engaged in international voyages will be enacted under the auspices of the ‘Biosecurity Act 2015’. A section of the ‘Biosecurity Act 2015’ concerns ballast water from ships on international voyages and has been so drafted as to ensure the implementation of the IMO’s ‘Ballast Water Management Convention’ (BWM Convention). Consequently, from June 16…

LR Safety Alert: BW Exchange & Air Pipe Head Damage

Photo: Lloyd's Register

Recent port state control detentions (particularly in Australian waters) have revealed numerous cases of damaged and inoperable ballast tank air pipe heads. The air pipe heads were of the automatic float type, from different manufacturers and used by different new construction shipyards. Investigation showed that all the air pipe heads had been damaged by being subjected to continuous overflow of the ballast tanks for ballast water exchange – a function for which they were not designed or intended to be used.

New Measures on Ballast Water Management Approval

"Back to the drawing board" is the message to designers of new vessels, as ballast water management is to become a major consideration in the design of new vessels following the approval by IMO of a series of measures aimed at reducing the effects of marine organisms transported in ballast water and the risks involved in some ballast water management techniques. The 47th session of the International Maritime Organization's Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC), which met in March in London, approved a Circular containing design suggestions for ballast water and sediment management options in new ships. The Circular says that…

Ballast Water Exchange: Is There A Better Way?

There are a few other topics gathering more information than ballast water exchange, as the chorus of environmental damage from the scientific community and howls of reform from the legislative community grow louder each day. Two naval architects working with Teekay Shipping in Japan were recently involved in a study and have issued a paper on a more efficient way to handle the ballast water conundrum. Ballast Water and Sediment Discharge is prohibited into coastal waters to minimize the risks of introduction of harmful marine organisms. Since management of ballast water discharge becomes mandatory, a ship is obliged to exchange ballast water in open ocean and as far as possible from coast. Two methods are introduced in IMO Resolution A.868 (20) adopted November 27, 1997.

USCG Accepts BWTS as Alternate Management Systems

The U.S. Coast Guard announced the acceptance of nine ballast water treatment systems today as Alternate Management Systems (AMS) in compliance with the service’s March 2012 final rule for Standards for Living Organisms in Ships’ Ballast Water Discharged (SLOSBWD) in U.S. waters. AMS acceptance by the Coast Guard is a temporary designation given to a ballast water treatment system approved by a foreign administration. Vessel operators may use an AMS to manage their ballast water discharges in lieu of ballast water exchange, while the treatment system undergoes approval testing to Coast Guard standards. An AMS may be used to meet the…

Effective Means Of Combating Invasive Aquatic Species Urged

Witnesses representing the shipping industry, ports, and an environmental organization met on May 15 to urge the development of mandatory federal ballast water management regulations and alternative management options to more effectively address the problem of aquatic invasive species in the United States. The joint hearing of the U.S. House Water Resources and Environment Subcommittee and the Coast Guard and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee focused on the implementation of the National Invasive Species Act of 1996 (NISA), which addresses aquatic invasive species and required the Transportation Secretary to issue voluntary guidelines to prevent the introduction of invasive species by vessels equipped with ballast water tanks.

Senate Committee OKs Ballast Water Bill

WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation today voted unanimously to approve the “Ballast Water Management Act of 2005” (S. 363), introduced by Senator Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) and co-sponsored by Senators Ted Stevens (R-Alaska), Maria Cantwell (D-Wash.), Frank Lautenberg (D-N.J.), Paul Sarbanes (D-Maryland), and Daniel Akaka (D-Hawaii). The legislation would amend the Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990 to establish a new, national approach to addressing invasive species in ballast water. Under the Manager’s Amendment approved today, the Coast Guard is authorized to direct $20 million annually, in fiscal years 2006 through 2010, toward invasive species mitigation.

Report on Ballast Water Management

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) issued a report summarizing ballast water management issues. It pointed out that high seas ballast water exchange is the most commonly used technique. Modification of a large ship so as to utilize onshore ballast water treatment facilities may cost an estimated $400,000. Retrofitting a vessel to treat ballast water may cost between $200,000 and $310,000 per vessel for mechanical treatment and around $300,000 for chemical treatment. (HK Law)

IMO Adopts New Ballast Water Rules

shipping and the prevention of marine pollution from ships. international conference held from 9 to13 February 2004 at IMO's London Headquarters. The Convention will require all ships to implement a Ballast Water and Sediments Management Plan. water management procedures to a given standard. but after a phase-in period. criteria set out in the Convention and to IMO guidelines yet to be developed. IMO Secretary-General Mr. Efthimios E. successful outcome of the conference. harmful aquatic organisms and pathogens across the seas and oceans of the world. ballast water and thus towards safeguarding the biodiversity of the oceans", Mr. Mitropoulos said. given the consensus decisions you were able to make on a subject of undeniable complexity.

California Clarifies BWMS Position

Installation or use of an USCG accepted Alternative Management Systems (AMS) does not waive a vessel's requirement to meet the California Code of Regulations ballast discharge performance standards. In accordance with the California Public Resource Code and California Code of Regulations, vessels may manage ballast water using an alternative, environmentally sound method approved by the California State Lands Commission or the USCG as being at least as effective as ballast water exchange, using mid-ocean waters, in eliminating nonindigenous species. As any USCG accepted AMS must demonstrate efficacy at least as effective as mid-ocean exchange…

U.S. Ports Endorse Ballast Water Legislation

In response to the growing trend of state laws regulating ballast water discharges from ships, U.S. ports plan to develop a legislative proposal that would: 1) establish a strong Federal ballast water management program; and, 2) preempt state legislation in this area. During the Monday, October 16, meeting of AAPA's U.S. Legislative Policy Council (USLPC) representing the Association's 84 U.S. port members, Chairman of the Board J. Robert Bray, Executive Director of the Virginia Port Authority, led the discussion of concepts for legislation in the area of ballast water and introduction of nonindigenous species. The USLPC voted unanimously to adopt the position which reflects Association members' growing concern over the development of new regulations in this area.

Kockum Sonics AB launches Ballast Water Exchange Concept

In response to the threat of invasive marine species, Sweden-based Kockum Sonics AB has developed a new concept for safe and efficient ballast water exchange on high seas. The concept is based on their two products LoadRite and Levelmaster - as exchanging ballast water in deep water requires careful planning. LoadRite, with its full 3-D description of the hull, is being used for hydrostatic calculations. It has been developed further to include the powerful Ballast Exchange Support Tool for the ship officers to define the fastest and safest way of ballast exchange at sea. A simulation of the complete ballast exchange process is followed by an online supervision in real-time as well as predicting future conditions.

IMO Meeting Approves Measures on Ballast Water Management

Ballast water management is to become a major consideration in the design of new vessels following the approval by IMO of a series of measures aimed at reducing the harmful effects of marine organisms transported in ballast water and the risks involved in some ballast water management techniques. The 47th session of the International Maritime Organization’s Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC), which met from 4 to 8 March at IMO Headquarters in London, approved a Circular containing a raft of design suggestions for ballast water and sediment management options in new ships. As a fundamental principle, the Circular states that…

New Rules for Ballast Water Management in Australia

Since July 2001, all ships entering Australian ports or waters from overseas have been subject to Australia’s national ballast water management requirements. These are currently enforced under the Quarantine Act 1908, but from June 16, 2016, they will be enforced under the  Biosecurity Act 2015. This has been drafted to move Australian legislation towards consistency with the International Maritime Organization’s Ballast Water Management Convention (the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships’ Ballast Water and Sediments 2004). At present, the Australian national requirements only list ballast water exchange as a valid ballast water management method and do not list ‘alternative ballast water management methods’ such as ballast water treatment systems.

Bill Introduced Re: Ballast Water Exchange

Representative Kirk (R-IL) introduced a bill (H.R. 801) to amend the Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990 to require application to all vessels equipped with ballast water tanks, including vessels that are not carrying ballast water, the requirement to carry out exchange of ballast water or alternative ballast water management methods prior to entry into any port within the Great Lakes, and for other purposes. Text of this bill is not yet available, but the description seems to indicate that a ship fully loaded with cargo, if bound for the Great Lakes, might have to take on and then discharge ballast water on the high seas. But, if the ship is already fully loaded, taking on ballast water might make the ship too heavy and thus unseaworthy. Source: HK Law

Government Update: Ballast Water Management Acquiring Teeth

Effective August 13, 2004, the U.S. Coast Guard will have the authority to impose civil penalties of up to $27,500 per day against vessels that fail to submit ballast water management reports. The basic ballast water management program has been in existence for some years, but submittal of reports has been largely voluntary since the agency lacked the power to require submittal. As a result, participation in the program has been abysmal - at less than 30 percent. It is expected that participation will rapidly become universal as the penalty regime takes hold. The goal of ballast water management is to reduce the risk of transport in a ship's ballast tanks of aquatic species from one location to another where the species is not indigenous and may have no natural enemies.

Bill To Reauthorize Ballast Water Law

Senator Levin (D-MI) introduced the National Aquatic Invasive Species Act of 2005 (S. 770) to amend the Nonindigenous Aquatic Nuisance Prevention and Control Act of 1990 to amend and improve that Act. The bill, which is 130 pages in length, includes some interesting provisions. For example, it would authorize ballast water exchange only through December 31, 2011. Thereafter, ships would have to utilize a technological approach that reduces the concentration of viable biological material in the ballast water by at least 99%. Additionally, the government would be required to analyze other pathways by which aquatic nuisance species enter U.S. waters. (HK Law)

U.S. Coast Guard Provides Guidance on Ballast Water AMS

The US Coast Guard issues a policy letter describing procedures for obtaining an Alternative Management System (AMS) determination of a foreign type-approved ballast water management system (BWMS). Foreign approved systems in accordance with applicable IMO standards must be as effective as traditional ballast water exchange for the prevention of introductions of aquatic nuisance species, says the Coast Guard. Foreign manufacturers of type-approved BWMS can request a Coast Guard determination that the BWMS is an AMS for purposes of the federal regulation. Applicants are also required to apply for USCG type-approval. Use of an AMS will be allowed for up to five years after the vessel is required to comply with the federal ballast water discharge standards.

Ballast Water Management: California Update

The updated map: Image CSL

The California State Lands Commission (CSL) has promulgated a letter to clarify its interpretation of existing ballast water requirements under the California's Marine Invasive Species Act (MISA) informs the UK P&I Club. In its letter, California recognizes that in certain limited circumstances under federal law a vessel may not be required to deviate or incur delay in order to conduct a ballast water exchange. However, CSL explains that MISA does not provide for any exemption based on deviation or voyage delay.

Port Awards Environmental Excellence Award

The Port of Los Angeles, along with the California Air Resources Board and the South Coast Air Quality Management District, presented today its first-ever Environmental Excellence Award to Evergreen America Corporation. The award recognizes the environmental stewardship of Port of Los Angeles customers. Port Chief Operating Officer Bruce Seaton presented the Environmental Excellence Award to Captain Hwang and Jason Hsu of Evergreen America. Evergreen has shown their commitment to reducing air emissions with several programs including being the most compliant company with the Port’s Vessel Reduction Program; being the first terminal operator in the U.S.

Great Lakes: Ballast Water Management

The U.S. Coast Guard issued best management practices for vessels entering the Great Lakes or the Hudson River north of the George Washington Bridge and declaring no ballast onboard (NOBOB). These practices are intended to minimize the likelihood of inadvertent introduction of aquatic nonindigenous species. The practices include, among other things, conducting either mid-ocean ballast water exchange or mid-ocean saltwater flushing. The draft environmental assessment should be widely available shortly. Comments should be submitted by September 30. 70 Fed. Reg. 51831 (HK Law)

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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