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Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Water Mixture News

Submerged Towboat Lifted in Iowa

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Mariana O'Leary

Response crews commenced lifting operations of the 154-foot sunken towboat from the Mississippi River bank near LeClaire, Iowa, Monday. Stephen L. Colby salvage crews worked to cradle and dewater the vessel in an effort to remove extra weight while lifting the towboat. Crews dealt with below freezing conditions and long hours throughout response efforts and continue to conduct pollution mitigation through cleanup operations. Approximately 39,900 gallons of oily-water mixture has been recovered from the river, 89,000 gallons of oily-water mixture recovered from the Stephen L.

Oil Spill at Port of Los Angeles

The U.S. Coast Guard is investigating a report of an oil spill in the Los Angeles Harbor, Thursday morning. Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Los Angeles/Long Beach command center received a report at 10:48 a.m. of an unknown quantity of oily-water mixture coming from a holding tank residing on the Vopak Terminal. Coast Guard investigators from Sector Los Angeles/Long Beach are currently investigating the report. A majority of the oil released has been reported as being contained on the pier, however, some of the oil water mixture entered the water. Oil spill response organizations including the National Response Corporation, Ocean Blue, and Patriot Environmental are conducting clean-up operations using oil skimmers and absorbent pads.

Coast Guard: Ships Minimize Speed in Texas Harbor

Ships are limited to daylight operation at minimum speed in the inner harbor of Corpus Christi, Texas, as the clean up of an oil spill from last week continues, the U.S. Coast Guard said. Most of the waste oil-water mixture spilled into the inner harbor on from Valero Energy Corp.'s Corpus Christi refining complex has been cleaned up, but workers are still cleaning docks and shoreline. An estimated 3,690 barrels of oil and water have been collected since lightning struck a containment tank at the Valero complex early on Thursday morning, the Coast Guard said. Source: Reuters

Order to Trial EVTN Underwater Voraxial Separator

Enviro Voraxial Technology, Inc. has received a purchase order to deploy the underwater version of EVTN’s high volume Voraxial 4000 Separator. EVTN envisions its underwater design as the core technology for an advanced generation of skimmer vessels to facilitate the Gulf clean-up effort and to effectively protect the environment from future offshore oil spills. Other technologies that have been deployed in the Gulf followed a similar trial process. The new Underwater Voraxial oil recovery method allows the operator to separate oil from water in the ocean. By conducting the separation in the ocean, the vessels can skim oil for 10 times longer since the amount of water collected in the holding tanks is reduced by 90%.

Tugboat Allides with Inactive Wellhead, Triggers Discharge

Scene of the spill: Photo credit USCG

The Coast Guard is reponding to limit pollution of the sea in the area 9 miles SW of Port Sulphur (on W. bank of the Mississippi) Louisiana. Coast Guard Sector New Orleans watchstanders received a report Tuesday that the 42-foot crewboat Sea Raider, allided with a wellhead owned by Swift Energy, causing the platform to discharge an oily-water mixture. Swift Energy, the responsible party, has contracted a barge to secure the wellhead. Response crews have deployed 1,800-feet of boom to contain the discharged oily-water mixture from the wellhead.

Closed Portion of Houston Ship Channel Opens

The three mile portion of the 52-mile Houston Ship Channel that was closed due to an oil spill Sept. 25 opened at 12:45 p.m. Sept. 28 to vessel traffic.  The channel, which was closed between Old Manchester Dock Three and City Dock 27, is open to all daylight operations and limited night time barge operations. The Coast Guard Vessel Traffic Service is managing all vessel movement. The Captain of the Port, Capt. Marcus Woodring, determined the oil is contained along the shoreline, making it safe to resume traffic flow through the affected area at a slow speed. Responders will continue to work to recover the remaining oil in the area. The exact amount of oil recovered is unknown, but as of 2 p.m. 23,418 gallons of an oil and water mixture has been recovered.

Argo Response Completed

Unified Command responders perform salvage operations for the Lake Erie sunken tanker barge Argo, hot-tapping and pumping the barges tanks on November 29, 2015. (U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Kurt Kollar, Ohio EPA)

The response effort to remove a hazardous cargo from the 104-year-old sunken tank barge Argo in Lake Erie officially ended Monday afternoon with the demobilization of all remaining equipment. Contracted by the U.S. Coast Guard as part of a Unified Command effort, salvors T&T Salvage recovered the highly toxic cargo from the 1911-built Argo, which sank in 1937 laden with a cargo of benzol that contained a high percentage of the carcinogen benzene. A total of 33,475 gallons of cargo and water mixture were removed from the vessel.

Hamworthy Improves on Separator Performance

Hamworthy signed a contract with FPSO Owner OSX 1 Leasing B.V., a subsidiary of OSX Brasil S.A., for delivery of its newest generation Vessel Internal Electrostatic Coalescer (VIEC) technology to the FPSO OSX-1. Upon completion of customization works currently in progress in , the FPSO OSX-1 will be delivered by OSX to its customer OGX Petróleo e Gás Ltda. under charter arrangements, for deployment in the basin, offshore . OSX and OGX are controlled by the EBX Group, owned by Brazilian entrepreneur Eike Batista.

News: OMI Pleads Guilty to Illegal Dump, To Pay $4.2M Fine

The U.S. Department of Justice said that OMI Corporation pleaded guilty to preparing false documents in an effort to cover up the illegal dumping of thousands of gallons of waste oil and sludge at sea. OMI also agreed to pay a $4.2 million fine and serve three years probation. A ship captain and chief engineer previously pled guilty in connection with the case. The ship involved in the case, the Motor Tanker Guadalupe, owned and operated by wholly owned subsidiaries of OMI Corporation, made port calls in the U.S., Europe, the Caribbean and Latin America. Ships such as the Guadalupe generate waste oil and sludge in the process of purifying the heavy fuel oil that is used to power the ship. Like other ships, the Guadalupe was equipped with a system for processing this waste oil and sludge.

USCG Detains 553-foot Vessel for Safety Violations

Great Success (Photo: Glenn Towler)

The Coast Guard detained the motor vessel Great Success, Tuesday,  requiring the vessel remain in Longview, Wash., until numerous safety violations are corrected by the ship’s crew. Port State Control officers from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River’s Marine Safety Unit in Portland, Ore., discovered the discrepancies during routine inspections of the 553-foot Hong Kong-flagged vessel in Kalama, Wash., Monday and Longview on Tuesday. Most safety discrepancies were related to fire danger and included excessive oil and oily water mixture in the bilges…

CG Final Update on Port Arthur Spill

Photo courtesy USCG

The unified response to the collision and oil spill from the tankship Eagle Otome continues. To date, more than 9,600 barrels of oil/water mixture has been recovered, evaporated or dispersed naturally of the 11,000 barrels spilled. Current response assets include 88 oil skimmers, 6 oil vacuum vehicles and 114,545 feet of containment boom. As the majority of the on-water oil has been recovered, the operation will begin to focus on shoreline clean-up and restoration. Vessel traffic and facility numbers have returned to pre-incident status. Vessel Traffic Service is managing traffic.

Barge Leak Stopped

The U.S. Coast Guard, working with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department and local officials, report that the sulfuric acid that began leaking from a barge in Chocolate Bayou Wednesday appears to have stopped leaking. Officials monitored the amount of product in the barge MGM3030, as well as the level of the barge in the water and the pH levels around the, throughout Wednesday night and into this morning and concluded that the barge was not leaking. Approximately 358,000 gallons of the original 430,000 gallons of acid cargo has been offloaded from the barge . Efforts to remove the remaining acid and water mixture from the barge are expected to continue into Friday.

Response Continues to Oil Spill off Louisiana

Two 210-foot and two 95-foot vessels conduct skimming operations, May 14, 2016, in response to a crude oil discharged from a segment of flow line at the Glider Field approximately 90 miles south of Timbalier Island, La. (U.S. Coast Guard photo: Marine Safety Unit Morgan City)

The joint effort between the U.S. Coast Guard and Shell continues in response to an oil discharge from a segment of flow line at the Glider Field located approximately 90 miles south of Timbalier Island, La., that occurred at approximately 11 a.m., Thursday. It is estimated that 88,200 gallons of crude oil has been discharged. Shell has shut-in production at the Glider Field. Five on-water recovery vessels have been mobilized and are searching for oil that can be safely recovered via skimming…

Chief Engineer Admits Dumping Waste Oil, Sludge at Sea

The chief engineer of an oil tanker that transports petroleum products to and from various ports in the United States and abroad pleaded guilty today to submitting false documents to the U.S. Coast Guard in an effort to cover up the illegal dumping of thousands of gallons of waste oil and sludge at sea, U.S. Attorney Christopher J. Christie announced. The captain of the vessel also pleaded guilty before U.S. District Judge Katharine S. Hayden to conspiracy in connection with his effort to conceal evidence and solicit false statements from a lower-level engineer during the Coast Guard boarding of the ship in the Port of Carteret on Sept. 10, Christie said.

Lower Mississippi Closure Due to Oil Spill

Tugboat 'Endeavor': Photo courtesy of Nature's Way Marine

US Coast Guard's unified command is dealing with a crude oil spill from a damaged barge in Vicksburg, Miss. The barge had earlier been damaged through contact with a bridge support while in tow, and the Mississippi River remains closed to all traffic for a 16-mile distance between mile marker 425 and mile marker 441 near Vicksburg. Currently there are 21 northbound and 34 southbound vessels affected due to the river closure. A lightering and salvage plan has been approved by the unified command and multiple response crews have been dispatched to begin removing oil from the barge.

Lower Mississippi Oil Spill Update

The unified command continues response to a crude oil spill near mile marker 436 in Vicksburg, Miss. The tow-barge that is on scene has started removing fuel from the damaged barge MOC-12, which will be inspected and prepared for transit to a maritime facility nearby Vicksburg after oil removal operations are complete. “Despite the response crew efforts to contain the seeping oil, an unspecified amount has broken through the containment boom due to the difficulties of working on a dynamic and powerful river current,” said Capt. William Drelling, Federal On Scene Commander for the Vicksburg oil spill. Response crews have deployed 2,800-feet of boom to contain further oil release. Skimming vessels have recovered approximately 3,900 gallons of oil-water mixture since the incident occurred.

Vicksburg Oil Spill Causes 800 Vessel Queue

Vicksburg Oil Spill Incident: Photo credit USCG

Lower Mississippi vessel traffic queue management ongoing as Unified Command continue their response to damaged barge. Following completion of the oil removal operations the damaged barge will be inspected and prepared for transit to a maritime facility in nearby Vicksburg. The MOC-15 barge has been moved upriver from the MOC-12 oil removal operation and is waiting for transportation to a maritime facility. Response crews have deployed 5,300 feet of boom to contain any potential oil releases.

Coast Guard Response to Vicksburg Spill Continues

The unified command continues to respond to a crude oil spill in the lower Mississippi River near mile marker 436 in Vicksburg, Miss., Thursday. At 10:05 a.m. response crews removed fuel from the damaged barge MOC-12 after reconfiguring oil-pump equipment. Following completion of the oil removal operations the damaged barge will be inspected and prepared for transit to a maritime facility in nearby Vicksburg. The MOC-15 barge has been moved upriver from the MOC-12 oil removal operation and is waiting for transportation to a maritime facility.

Delaware River Spill Update

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration scientific support team has projected that tar balls and scattered patches of oil could be washing ashore at anytime along the northern Atlantic shoreline of Delaware and the southern Atlantic shoreline of New Jersey. Patches of oil have been seen from the Tacony Palymyra Bridge to south of Smyrna River on the Delaware River. Tar balls were also found yesterday in the C&D Canal in Maryland. Residents of these areas can expect to see tar balls, but not in high numbers. The ATHOS I has been temporarily moved to the Marcus Hook Anchorage. It's next destination will be a graving dock at the Naval Shipyard in Philadelphia to repair the holes in the hull.

Delaware River Update Oil Spill Update

The Coast Guard, state and local agencies as well as contracted environmental agencies continued the unified effort to cleanup and investigate Friday night's oil spill in the Delaware River. Limited traffic is being permitted to transit the security zone on a case by case bases. Protective barriers will be in place as needed to ensure the oiled areas around the vessel are not spread during the vessel's movement. Daily over-flights and boat crews will monitor the channel for further oil. The vessels will be cleaned after they transit the impacted area to limit the spread of the oil. An additional 170 workers will be added to the efforts bringing the total to 400 people involved in the clean up. Crews have recovered thousands of gallons of oil and oil water mixtures.

Delaware Oil Spill Update

The unified command is continuing its clean up efforts today in response to the undetermined amount of oil that was spilled into the Delaware River by the ATHOS I on November 27th. Barges are being used to offload the ships oil cargo in order to lighten the ship for salvage operations. The barges have offloaded 2.52 million gallons of product so far. Transfer operations are expected to be completed early this week. The cause of the incident is still under investigation. More than 1,400 responders are working in the command center and out in the field. 16 vessels are employed in the clean-up efforts and an additional 124 vessels are assisting in the response. 10,918 gallons of oil/water mixture has been recovered. 6,720 pounds of oily solids (cleanup materials and oil) have been collected.

OMI Ordered to Pay $4.2M

Thomas L. Sansonetti, Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department’s Environment and Natural Resources Division, and Christopher J. Christie, U.S. Attorney for the District of New Jersey, announced that a Connecticut-based shipping company that transports petroleum products in the United States and abroad was sentenced to pay $4.2 million for illegally concealing the dumping of thousands of gallons of waste oil and sludge at sea. U.S. District Judge Katharine S. Hayden ordered OMI Corporation, to pay a $4.2 million fine and serve three years of probation. Judge Hayden also awarded $2.1 million of the fine to a former OMI crew member who reported the crimes to the government.

River Remains Closed; Clean-Up Continues

The lower section of the Neches River from just north of DuPont plant to the Veteran’s Bridge remains closed as the oil spill clean up continues. "The safety of our responders, and the restoration and opening of the Neches River as quickly as possible are our main goals," said Capt. Sharon Richey, Commanding Officer of Marine Safety Officer Port Arthur and Captain of the Port. "We have more than 175 responders now on scene working to clean the river. The recovered oil is being taken to a holding tank at the local UNOCAL facility, where it will be recycled. The oiled snare boom and adsorbent pads are being stored in roll-off boxes to be disposed of later. Initial clean up costs are estimated to be $700,000. The costs will rise as clean up continues.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Oct 2017 - The Marine Design Annual

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