Marine Link
Tuesday, September 25, 2018

Water Mixture News

Order to Trial EVTN Underwater Voraxial Separator

Enviro Voraxial Technology, Inc. has received a purchase order to deploy the underwater version of EVTN’s high volume Voraxial 4000 Separator. EVTN envisions its underwater design as the core technology for an advanced generation of skimmer vessels to facilitate the Gulf clean-up effort and to effectively protect the environment from future offshore oil spills. Other technologies that have been deployed in the Gulf followed a similar trial process. The new Underwater Voraxial oil recovery method allows the operator to separate oil from water in the ocean. By conducting the separation in the ocean, the vessels can skim oil for 10 times longer since the amount of water collected in the holding tanks is reduced by 90%.

Tugboat Allides with Inactive Wellhead, Triggers Discharge

Scene of the spill: Photo credit USCG

The Coast Guard is reponding to limit pollution of the sea in the area 9 miles SW of Port Sulphur (on W. bank of the Mississippi) Louisiana. Coast Guard Sector New Orleans watchstanders received a report Tuesday that the 42-foot crewboat Sea Raider, allided with a wellhead owned by Swift Energy, causing the platform to discharge an oily-water mixture. Swift Energy, the responsible party, has contracted a barge to secure the wellhead. Response crews have deployed 1,800-feet of boom to contain the discharged oily-water mixture from the wellhead.

Oceanex Is Building Innovation

Seated at his desk with a view of St. John’s harbour, Oceanex Executive Chairman Captain Sid Hynes is highlighting the innovation in the Oceanex Connaigra, Oceanex Inc.,’s 210-m custom-designed container/roll on roll off (Con/Ro) ice class 1A ship that is presently coming to life in the Flensburger Schiffbau-Gesellschaft mbH & Co. (FSG) shipyard in Flensburg, Germany. Following four years of study and research, the design stage was completed. First steel was cut in October 2012, and the keel was laid on February 11,  2013.

Driving the Inland Waterways

Eastern Thunderbolt  Towboat Proposal Profile

Propulsion evolves, improves and powers forward in the inland markets. And, Z-Drive propulsion is the future. In a white paper released late in 2014 by The Shearer Group, Ed Shearer and Greg Beers outlined The Next Generation of inland vessels, what will drive design changes and the advantages of azimuthing stern drives – or ‘Z-Drives,’ for short. The authors point out that, until recently, towboats on all the inland waterways and Gulf Coast have traditionally been built using main engines connected to reduction gearboxes connected to long drive shafts passing through the towboat hull.

Hamworthy Improves on Separator Performance

Hamworthy signed a contract with FPSO Owner OSX 1 Leasing B.V., a subsidiary of OSX Brasil S.A., for delivery of its newest generation Vessel Internal Electrostatic Coalescer (VIEC) technology to the FPSO OSX-1. Upon completion of customization works currently in progress in , the FPSO OSX-1 will be delivered by OSX to its customer OGX Petróleo e Gás Ltda. under charter arrangements, for deployment in the basin, offshore . OSX and OGX are controlled by the EBX Group, owned by Brazilian entrepreneur Eike Batista.

NAVSEA Takes Lead in Repairing Oil Leak from Sunken Ship

Divers from Mobile Underwater Diving Salvage Unit (MUDSU) 1 based at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, will soon descend into a Pacific lagoon to stop a recent oil leak and assess the material condition of a World War II Navy oil tanker that sank in 1944. USS Mississinewa (AO 59), a 553-foot auxiliary oiler, was commissioned May 18, 1944, and supported the ships of the 3rd Fleet in the Central and South Pacific. The huge lagoon at Ulithi Atoll was an anchorage for hundreds of Pacific Fleet ships and major staging area for campaigns at Leyte Gulf, Iwo Jima and Okinawa. Mississinewa was anchored in Ulithi's lagoon when it was struck by a Japanese-manned suicide torpedo, or "kaiten," on the morning of Nov. 20, 1944. The ship burst into flames and sank, killing 63 American Sailors.

Oil Spill at Port of Los Angeles

The U.S. Coast Guard is investigating a report of an oil spill in the Los Angeles Harbor, Thursday morning. Watchstanders at Coast Guard Sector Los Angeles/Long Beach command center received a report at 10:48 a.m. of an unknown quantity of oily-water mixture coming from a holding tank residing on the Vopak Terminal. Coast Guard investigators from Sector Los Angeles/Long Beach are currently investigating the report. A majority of the oil released has been reported as being contained on the pier, however, some of the oil water mixture entered the water. Oil spill response organizations including the National Response Corporation, Ocean Blue, and Patriot Environmental are conducting clean-up operations using oil skimmers and absorbent pads.

River Remains Closed; Clean-Up Continues

The lower section of the Neches River from just north of DuPont plant to the Veteran’s Bridge remains closed as the oil spill clean up continues. "The safety of our responders, and the restoration and opening of the Neches River as quickly as possible are our main goals," said Capt. Sharon Richey, Commanding Officer of Marine Safety Officer Port Arthur and Captain of the Port. "We have more than 175 responders now on scene working to clean the river. The recovered oil is being taken to a holding tank at the local UNOCAL facility, where it will be recycled. The oiled snare boom and adsorbent pads are being stored in roll-off boxes to be disposed of later. Initial clean up costs are estimated to be $700,000. The costs will rise as clean up continues.

USCG Detains 553-foot Vessel for Safety Violations

Great Success (Photo: Glenn Towler)

The Coast Guard detained the motor vessel Great Success, Tuesday,  requiring the vessel remain in Longview, Wash., until numerous safety violations are corrected by the ship’s crew. Port State Control officers from Coast Guard Sector Columbia River’s Marine Safety Unit in Portland, Ore., discovered the discrepancies during routine inspections of the 553-foot Hong Kong-flagged vessel in Kalama, Wash., Monday and Longview on Tuesday. Most safety discrepancies were related to fire danger and included excessive oil and oily water mixture in the bilges…

Response Continues to Oil Spill off Louisiana

Two 210-foot and two 95-foot vessels conduct skimming operations, May 14, 2016, in response to a crude oil discharged from a segment of flow line at the Glider Field approximately 90 miles south of Timbalier Island, La. (U.S. Coast Guard photo: Marine Safety Unit Morgan City)

The joint effort between the U.S. Coast Guard and Shell continues in response to an oil discharge from a segment of flow line at the Glider Field located approximately 90 miles south of Timbalier Island, La., that occurred at approximately 11 a.m., Thursday. It is estimated that 88,200 gallons of crude oil has been discharged. Shell has shut-in production at the Glider Field. Five on-water recovery vessels have been mobilized and are searching for oil that can be safely recovered via skimming…

Submerged Towboat Lifted in Iowa

U.S. Coast Guard photo by Petty Officer 1st Class Mariana O'Leary

Response crews commenced lifting operations of the 154-foot sunken towboat from the Mississippi River bank near LeClaire, Iowa, Monday. Stephen L. Colby salvage crews worked to cradle and dewater the vessel in an effort to remove extra weight while lifting the towboat. Crews dealt with below freezing conditions and long hours throughout response efforts and continue to conduct pollution mitigation through cleanup operations. Approximately 39,900 gallons of oily-water mixture has been recovered from the river, 89,000 gallons of oily-water mixture recovered from the Stephen L.

Navy’s Eco-friendly Waste Disposal System

An environmentally friendly and cost-effective solution to the disposal of oily sludge waste has been developed by engineers, microbiologists, and chemists from Naval Facilities Engineering Command Hawaii (NAVFAC) Hawaii and NAVFAC Engineering Service Center (ESC). The solution makes it possible to remediate oily sludge waste at Pearl Harbor instead of shipping it to the mainland for disposal, which is a large cost burden and liability for the Navy. Remediating the waste is also a sustainable practice. Natural elements and processes are used, and the by-products of the remediation are natural and harmless to the environment. The oily sludge waste remediation project began as a pilot study in 2004 at the Bilge Water/Oily Waste Treatment Facility at Pearl Harbor.

Vessel Salvage Ops Continue in Puerto Rico

Photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Lisa Ferdinando

The Hurricane Maria ESF-10 Puerto Rico response team continued Wednesday assessing and removing storm-ravaged vessels from targeted sites throughout the island. Crews conducted boater outreach in Isleta Maria, and surveys in Ponce and Cabo Rojo. Salvage crews also conducted dive assessments in Isleta Maria and crane-barge operations in Puerto Chico. Additionally, the team on Monday removed the last of five vessels targeted for removal in Las Croabas. Saturday, salvage crews used a crane barge to remove a sailboat that was previously  blocking the roadway in north Fajardo.

Vessel Pollution Prosecutions – A New Twist

Vincent J. Foley

By Vincent J. Foley- New York and John S. On July 15, 2009, the U.S. Department of Justice announced that the Captain and Chief Officer of a foreign vessel pled guilty in the Eastern District of Louisiana (New Orleans) to charges that included not only the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships (APPS), False Statements and Obstruction of Justice; but also failure to notify the Coast Guard of hazardous conditions and charges related to presentation of false or incomplete ballast tank reports.

Closed Portion of Houston Ship Channel Opens

The three mile portion of the 52-mile Houston Ship Channel that was closed due to an oil spill Sept. 25 opened at 12:45 p.m. Sept. 28 to vessel traffic.  The channel, which was closed between Old Manchester Dock Three and City Dock 27, is open to all daylight operations and limited night time barge operations. The Coast Guard Vessel Traffic Service is managing all vessel movement. The Captain of the Port, Capt. Marcus Woodring, determined the oil is contained along the shoreline, making it safe to resume traffic flow through the affected area at a slow speed. Responders will continue to work to recover the remaining oil in the area. The exact amount of oil recovered is unknown, but as of 2 p.m. 23,418 gallons of an oil and water mixture has been recovered.

Limited Traffic Authorized at Port of Houston

USCG photo

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) has authorized limited marine traffic in the safety zone in the Port of Houston/Galveston for commercial ship traffic, Tuesday. Cleanup operations are still ongoing; however ships are being prioritized for transit by the Port Coordination Team. The USCG said barges are allowed to transit through the Houston Ship Channel and on the Intracoastal Waterway, after assessment teams deemed the channel clear. "The cleanup operations progress is to the point…

Sabine-Neches Waterway Open, Limited Traffic

The Unified Command, consisting of the Texas General Land Office, the U.S. Coast Guard and the Eagle Otome's owner, opened the Sabine-Neches Waterway on Jan. 27 to limited traffic after moving the tank vessel Eagle Otome to the Sunoco oil terminal in Beaumont on the evening of Jan. 26. "The Unified Command has been working closely to get the waterway back open as safely as possible," said Coast Guard Capt. J.J. Plunkett, captain of the port and federal on-scene coordinator for the response. Three tugs escorted the Eagle Otome, while two boats carried boom to prevent further spillage and a fire fighting barge was on scene to prevent any fires. Two pilots were on board the ship to further ensure its safe transit to Beaumont.

CG Final Update on Port Arthur Spill

Photo courtesy USCG

The unified response to the collision and oil spill from the tankship Eagle Otome continues. To date, more than 9,600 barrels of oil/water mixture has been recovered, evaporated or dispersed naturally of the 11,000 barrels spilled. Current response assets include 88 oil skimmers, 6 oil vacuum vehicles and 114,545 feet of containment boom. As the majority of the on-water oil has been recovered, the operation will begin to focus on shoreline clean-up and restoration. Vessel traffic and facility numbers have returned to pre-incident status. Vessel Traffic Service is managing traffic.

Argo Response Completed

Unified Command responders perform salvage operations for the Lake Erie sunken tanker barge Argo, hot-tapping and pumping the barges tanks on November 29, 2015. (U.S. Coast Guard photo courtesy of Kurt Kollar, Ohio EPA)

The response effort to remove a hazardous cargo from the 104-year-old sunken tank barge Argo in Lake Erie officially ended Monday afternoon with the demobilization of all remaining equipment. Contracted by the U.S. Coast Guard as part of a Unified Command effort, salvors T&T Salvage recovered the highly toxic cargo from the 1911-built Argo, which sank in 1937 laden with a cargo of benzol that contained a high percentage of the carcinogen benzene. A total of 33,475 gallons of cargo and water mixture were removed from the vessel.

Lower Mississippi Closure Due to Oil Spill

Tugboat 'Endeavor': Photo courtesy of Nature's Way Marine

US Coast Guard's unified command is dealing with a crude oil spill from a damaged barge in Vicksburg, Miss. The barge had earlier been damaged through contact with a bridge support while in tow, and the Mississippi River remains closed to all traffic for a 16-mile distance between mile marker 425 and mile marker 441 near Vicksburg. Currently there are 21 northbound and 34 southbound vessels affected due to the river closure. A lightering and salvage plan has been approved by the unified command and multiple response crews have been dispatched to begin removing oil from the barge.

Lower Mississippi Oil Spill Update

The unified command continues response to a crude oil spill near mile marker 436 in Vicksburg, Miss. The tow-barge that is on scene has started removing fuel from the damaged barge MOC-12, which will be inspected and prepared for transit to a maritime facility nearby Vicksburg after oil removal operations are complete. “Despite the response crew efforts to contain the seeping oil, an unspecified amount has broken through the containment boom due to the difficulties of working on a dynamic and powerful river current,” said Capt. William Drelling, Federal On Scene Commander for the Vicksburg oil spill. Response crews have deployed 2,800-feet of boom to contain further oil release. Skimming vessels have recovered approximately 3,900 gallons of oil-water mixture since the incident occurred.

Vicksburg Oil Spill Causes 800 Vessel Queue

Vicksburg Oil Spill Incident: Photo credit USCG

Lower Mississippi vessel traffic queue management ongoing as Unified Command continue their response to damaged barge. Following completion of the oil removal operations the damaged barge will be inspected and prepared for transit to a maritime facility in nearby Vicksburg. The MOC-15 barge has been moved upriver from the MOC-12 oil removal operation and is waiting for transportation to a maritime facility. Response crews have deployed 5,300 feet of boom to contain any potential oil releases.

Coast Guard Response to Vicksburg Spill Continues

The unified command continues to respond to a crude oil spill in the lower Mississippi River near mile marker 436 in Vicksburg, Miss., Thursday. At 10:05 a.m. response crews removed fuel from the damaged barge MOC-12 after reconfiguring oil-pump equipment. Following completion of the oil removal operations the damaged barge will be inspected and prepared for transit to a maritime facility in nearby Vicksburg. The MOC-15 barge has been moved upriver from the MOC-12 oil removal operation and is waiting for transportation to a maritime facility.

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Sep 2018 - Maritime Port & Ship Security

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