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Monday, November 20, 2017

Yugoslavia News

Shipping Company's Losses Total $110M

Ukraine's Danube Shipping Company lost $110 million due to military action in Yugoslavia last year that destroyed bridges and blocked traffic along the Danube, transport minister Leonid Kostyuchenko said. NATO launched air strikes last year on Yugoslavia, which it accused of ethnic cleansing in the province of Kosovo, densely populated by ethnic Albanians. Kostyuchenko said collapsed bridges had blocked 63 Ukrainian ships on upper stretches of the Danube. Due to the disruption of the shipping, Ukraine's Danube ports were now working at just 40 percent of capacity, he said. This is not the first time Ukrainian companies suffer from problems in Yugoslavia.

Slovak Shipmaker May Face Crisis Due to Kosovo

Shipyard Slovenske Lodenice Komarno reportedly faces serious delivery problems due to the blockage of transport on the Danube in Yugoslavia.

Shippers Suffer Losses Due To Blocked Danube

The Danube will remain blocked by bombed Yugoslav bridges through the winter, with the cost of removal estimated at as much as $31.5 million, the Danube Commission announced, adding that private shippers are racking up losses far in excess of these figures. "Environmental damage of considerable consequence goes far beyond what it would cost the international community to clear the bridges and re-establish navigation," Hellmuth Strasser, head of the commission's secretariat, said. He added that re-establishing the river's shipping is the most difficult task the Danube Commission has faced since World War II. Experts estimate it will cost between $15.8 and $31.5 million to remove bridges bombed by NATO during its air campaign against Yugoslavia, Strasser said.

Danube Blockage Seen Lasting Through Winter

The collapsed bridges blocking the River Danube since NATO's March-to-June bombing of Yugoslavia are likely to remain there through the winter, sources said. Despite the best efforts of Hungary and Austria to speed up an appeal for EU funding to clear the river, they said, at a cost estimated between 12 and 30 million euros ($12.3-$30.7 million), it was unlikely any work would begin much before spring. Hungary and Austria, as well as other Danube nations, are eager to get the river cleared, not only to resume shipping, where losses for member states had run up to $175 million by the end of October, but also for fear that a cold winter could create ice blockage and flooding.

EU Ready To Clear Danube If Serbia Cooperates

Work on clearing bombed bridges from the Danube River in Yugoslavia could begin in March if Belgrade agrees next week to a proposal that the European Union would help fund, according to EU sources. Removing the wreckage of three bridges destroyed by NATO during last year's 11-week air war over Kosovo from the river at Novi Sad in Serbia is essential to reopen the key international waterway to commercial shipping. However, it will require a compromise on the sensitive issue of post-war reconstruction that could cause friction with the U.S. The $30 million project awaits approval by the Danube Commission, made up of states through which the river flows, including Yugoslavia. The decision requires unanimity.

Hungary Sees Danube Cleared By Summer At Earliest

The debris blocking the Danube shipping route in Yugoslavia could be cleared away by the summer, but more likely not until November, a senior Hungarian foreign ministry official said. The Danube, one of the most heavily used waterways in Europe, has been blocked along a vital stretch in Serbia since NATO destroyed several bridges during its bombing campaign against Yugoslavia last year. This has caused serious losses to the mostly central and eastern European countries using the river. An obstacle hindering the process is that the cleanup of the debris involves the building of a bridge over the river. The U.S. supports the cleanup of the Danube but it does not want to see a bridge to be built in a Serbia ruled by President Slobodan Milosevic.

This Day in Naval History – April 26

1869 - The Good Conduct Medal was authorized 1921 - U.S. Naval Detachment left Yugoslavia after administering area around Spalato for 2 years to guarantee transfer of area from Austria to new country 1952 - USS Hobson sinks after colliding with USS Wasp; 176 lives lost (Source: Navy News Service)  

This Day in U.S. Naval History - April 26

1869 - The Good Conduct Medal was authorized    1921 - U.S. Naval Detachment left Yugoslavia after administering area around Spalato for 2 years to guarantee transfer of area from Austria to new country   1952 - USS Hobson sinks after colliding with USS Wasp; 176 lives lost   (Source: Navy News Service)

HMS Invincible Called Home

Britain has recalled the aircraft carrier HMS Invincible from the Adriatic Sea where it has been involved in the NATO air campaign against Yugoslavia. No direct replacement of the ship is currently planned.

Milosevic, Not Debris, Is Blocking Danube Shipping

NATO Secretary General Lord George Robertson said that Serbia could not expect help to clear the Danube waterway of Kosovo war debris as long as Slobodan Milosevic remains president of Yugoslavia. Western reconstruction aid is barred as long as Milosevic is in power. But the Danube blockage is becoming acute as winter nears, with the threat of an ice buildup and flooding upstream. NATO-member Hungary and other Danube shipping states want to ease the no-aid policy so the river can be cleared at Novi Sad, in northwestern Serbia, before winter sets in. As NATO figures privately admit Milosevic is still firmly implanted, the Serbian opposition is urging the West to drop the blunt instrument of sanctions and help some reconstruction. But Robertson gave no sign concessions were being mooted.

Bulgaria, Serbia River Traffic Resumes

River Danube traffic between Bulgaria and Serbia partially resumed at the end of June, immediately after NATO'S air war against Yugoslavia finished, according to officials from Bulgaria's state Danube navigation company. "Bulgarian ships are running to Serbian Danube ports, even up to Novi Sad," said the chief of the Bulgarian River Navigation Authority (BRNA) Dimitar Stanchev. Serbian ships are also running to Bulgarian Danube ports, as well as to Romanian and Ukrainian ports, he added. He said traffic was much less than before the airstrikes but said he could not give volumes at this stage. There have been press reports of a Bulgarian private shipping company planning to open a regular line from the Bulgarian port of Lom to Prahovo in Serbia, hoping to attract tourists and traders.

Clearing Danube of Bridge Debris A Priority

Clearing the Danube of bombed bridges and helping Serbia get through the winter are priorities for a Balkan stability pact, Bodo Hombach, the head of the European Union's reconstruction plan said, but insisted that Europe would not help Yugoslav President Slobodan Milosevic. "The stability pact is not against the Yugoslav people," Hombach said. The EU and the United States agreed in July to create a multi-national reconstruction program to stabilize the Balkans and encourage democratic change in Yugoslavia by denying all but humanitarian aid to Serbia. The Yugoslav republic of Montenegro was granted exceptions because of its western-leaning government and stance during NATO's air campaign against Milosevic.

Transas Installs Simulator Complex in Montenegro

In September 2002, Transas supplied its integrated simulator complex to Azalea Maritime Training Centre in Montenegro, Yugoslavia. According to the contract, the procurement included a Transas Navi-Trainer Professional 3000 navigational bridge simulator with 3 visualisation channels, real bridge consoles and steering equipment. Further, a PC-based networked ERS 2000 engine room simulator with a Ship’s Diesel Propulsion Plant, Ship’s Electric Power Plant and an Auxiliary Systems and Machinery simulator; and liquid cargo handling simulator for onboard operations with Liquefied Natural Gas Cargo are included. The installation work carried out by Transas engineers was followed, as always, by a 3-day training course organized at the premises of the Azalea training center.

Shippers Seek $90M In Restitution

The association of Romanian river shippers said it would sue the Romanian government and NATO over a total estimated loss of $90 million because of the Kosovo conflict. Association president Mircea Toader said the losses had been caused by the embargo on Yugoslavia after the Kosovo war and by the blockage of the Danube. Toader, who was speaking at the end of a meeting in the Danube port town of Galati, said the association -- representing 95 percent of Romania's river shippers -- voted to ask the Romanian state for damages worth $5.4 million for lost crude oil transport contracts during the embargo. The association also announced plans to sue the North Atlantic Treaty Organization over alleged losses indirectly caused by the bombing of Yugoslav bridges.

Shipping on Danube Slated For Spring 2002

Regular shipping on the river Danube will not resume before the spring of 2002, following the removal of NATO bombing debris from the river in Serbia, the head of the Danube Commission, Hellmuth Strasser, said. The economies of countries using the lower Danube - mainly Romania, Bulgaria and Yugoslavia - are losing more than $306 million a year due to the obstruction of the river, he said. The Danube has been blocked along a vital stretch in Serbia since 1999, when NATO bombing destroyed three bridges at the city of Novi Sad. In April a Danish-Hungarian consortium was awarded a 26 million euro contract to begin cleaning debris from the river. Such cleaning, however, has yet to begin, Strasser said. - (Reuters)

This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – November 22

1906-At the second International Radio Telegraphic Convention, which was held in Berlin, the attendees agreed to adopt the wireless signal "SOS" as the internationally recognized signal for distress at sea. Their thinking was that three dots, three dashes and three dots could not be misinterpreted. 1953-A great boon to ocean navigation for aircraft surface vessels was the completion of four new LORAN stations in the Far East. The stations were built at Mikayo Jima, Ryuku Islands; Bataan and Cantanduanes Islands, Philippines; and Anguar, Palau Island in the Carolinas chain. Now replaced by the more accurate LORAN-C network, these stations on sparsely-populated, remote and typhoon-battered islands.

Navibulgar Upgrades Black Sea Ferry

Ro-Ro ferry operation. The destination had been 'out of reach' to Navibulgar, whose two 13,000 DWT rail, truck and car ferries - Geroite na Odessa (Hero of Odessa) and Geroite na Sevastopol - were originally constructed with a single stern door designed to be accessed by shore ramp, which Derince and many other ports in the region do not possess. range of additional port options. companies. components. achieved on-time and on-budget. Navibulgar's second ferry, Geroite na Sevastopol. trucks. passenger berths. former Yugoslavia. and Yugoslavia. Russian 1520mm gauges. company in Bulgaria. Black Sea every year. fleet.

This Day in Coast Guard History – May 20, 2010

1882-The lookout of Station No. 10 (Louisville, Kentucky), 9th District, spotted two men and a skiff being swept toward the dam and falls of the Ohio River. He sounded the alarm and "a boat at once shot out from the station, and reached the men in time to save them. They were quite ignorant of rowing . . . and were at the mercy of the flood sweeping towards the dam. 1999- The CGC Bear arrived in Rota, Spain. She was deployed to the Adriatic Sea in support of “Operation Allied Force” and “Operation Noble Anvil”, NATO's military campaign against the forces of the former Republic of Yugoslavia. Bear served in the USS Theodore Roosevelt Battle Group providing surface surveillance and SAR response for the Sea Combat Commander…

Bow Mariner Investigation Completed

The investigation of the Feb. 28, 2004 sinking of a chemical tank ship off the coast of Virginia has been completed. A press conference is scheduled for Tuesday January 3, 2006, at 10 a.m. to be held at Coast Guard Sector Hampton Roads at 200 Granby Street, in Norfolk. The speaker will be Capt. Robert O' Brien, Captain of the Port of Hampton Roads. He will be accompanied by Jerry Crooks, Chief of Investigations at Sector Hampton Roads. The Bow Mariner, a 570-foot, 40,000-ton tanker exploded with 27 people aboard. It was carrying 3.2 million gallons of industrial-grade ethanol, plus 200,000 gallons of No. 6 fuel oil and 53,000 gallons of diesel oil.

Signet Tows Aircraft Carrier on Final Voyage

SOLAS Certified, ABS A1, 10,000 BHP, Signet Warhorse III en route to Newport Naval Shipyard to tow USS Saratoga to Brownsville, Texas.

The final voyage of aircraft carrier USS Saratoga begins today. From the Eastern Hemisphere to the Western Hemisphere, the USS Saratoga has made her mark around the globe, and served more than 38 years in the United States Navy. The carrier’s aircraft flew sorties in the Vietnam War, in Operation Desert Shield and over the states of the former Yugoslavia in 1992. Throughout its four decades of service, more than 60,000 sailors served on its decks, with roughly 5,000 at any given time.

Helen Delich Bentley Dies at 92

Helen Delich Bentley (Image courtesy of the U.S. Congress)

Helen Delich Bentley, a former journalist and a U.S. Republican congresswoman from Maryland who gained global attention by smashing Japanese goods to protest Tokyo's trade policies, died over the weekend at the age of 92, officials said. Bentley upset a longtime Democratic congressman to win a U.S. House of Representatives seat in 1984, a year in which Ronald Reagan's landslide victory in the presidential race helped bring several new faces from the party to Congress. The five-term congresswoman was a staunch advocate for the port of Baltimore and the state's maritime industry.

U.S. and British Navies Save 27 Crew Members from Sinking Cargo Vessel

From U.S. Naval Forces Central Command/U.S. Twenty-seven crew members of a sinking Egyptian-flagged cargo vessel were saved approximately 350 miles off the coast of Oman June 24 by the U.S. and British navies. The 24-year-old general cargo ship, Green Glory, reportedly struggled with an engine fire at approximately 5 p.m. the evening of June 23. Heavy seas in the area caused Green Glory to take on water, and a “mayday” call went out at approximately 5:54 p.m. The Royal Navy’s auxiliary ship, RFA Sir Tristram, was the closest coalition ship to the stricken vessel and provided assistance throughout the night. Although Green Glory was able to restart its engines in the middle of the night, the vessel was still dead-in-the-water and continued to flounder. The U.S.

Tanker Not An Environmental Disaster Yet

Environmental disaster has been averted for now but France is taking no risks after a tanker carrying thousands of tons of toxic chemicals sank off the Normandy coast, Reuters reported President Jacques Chirac as saying. Visiting an emergency operations center in Cherbourg, northwestern France, Chirac said information was still being gathered on how best to recover the chemicals that officials said were already leaking from the Italian tanker Ievoli Sun, which sank in the English Channel on Tuesday. "It's escaping in bursts," Cherbourg maritime captain Jean-Francois Choquart said. "It has to be styrene that has escaped from a forward storage tank…

Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Nov 2017 - The Workboat Edition

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