Marine Link
Monday, January 22, 2018

Inside Modutech Marine’s Work Boat Medium

Maritime Activity Reports, Inc.

January 12, 2018

  • (Photo courtesy of Modutech)
  • (Photo courtesy of Modutech)
  • (Photo courtesy of Modutech)
  • (Photo courtesy of Modutech)
  • (Photo courtesy of Modutech) (Photo courtesy of Modutech)
  • (Photo courtesy of Modutech) (Photo courtesy of Modutech)
  • (Photo courtesy of Modutech) (Photo courtesy of Modutech)
  • (Photo courtesy of Modutech) (Photo courtesy of Modutech)

The U.S. Navy has some spectacular vessels, from submarines to high speed RIBs. They also have dedicated ports and support facilities worldwide. A practical reality of all of this is that the Navy requires efficient and handy boats to support the warhorses. To meet this requirement John Myers of the naval architect firm Hockema & Whalen and Associates have developed a 30 by 15-foot tug with a 5.5-foot draft.

 
Currently the Navy has 24 of these tugs, designated Work Boat Medium, on order from Modutech Marine Inc. of Tacoma, Wash. The first was delivered in December of 2017 with the others to follow in regular deliveries through to December 2019.
 
In order to handle some heavy pushing, the Navy has ordered the vessels to be powered by a pair of Cummins QSL 9 diesels each delivering 285 HP continuous duty. The engines will turn nozzled 39- by 36-inch propellers through ZF W325 gears with 3:1 reduction. Triple shutter-type rudders are mounted behind each prop. The combined 570 HP will give the 30-foot tugs a 17,500-pound bollard pull. Between jobs, the boats will be capable of nine-knot speeds.
 
Tankage will include a 400-gallon fuel tank. On deck, a 400-pound davit can be moved to port or starboard mounts as required.  A pair of Bloom deck winches are mounted forward, port and starboard, so as to function with a pair of cheek blocks mounted alongside the pilothouse for making up to a barge with the push knees. Wide side decks provide a safe work space for the deckhand. A towing bitt is mounted on the after deck. Heavy bollards are mounted on both sides for mooring and for working barges or other equipment on the hip. Lifting pad eyes are built into the tugs’ structure. 
 
D-Rubber fendering surrounds the hull, including the chine, and is mounted on the push knees that extend below the waterline. The wheelhouse has overhead windows for working alongside ships. This series of boats have clearly been designed with careful attention to detail and thought to versatility of application and varied roles to which they may be assigned. 
Maritime Reporter Magazine Cover Dec 2017 - The Great Ships of 2017

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