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Lindenau Introduces Safety Craft Design At SMM

The Safety Standby Catamaran (SSC), or Safety 2000, was designed by naval architect Jiirgen Issleib and presented by Lindenau GmbH at the SMM '94 show in Hamburg, Germany. The craft was developed to fulfill all requirements for attending offshore installations.

The Safety 2000 will be able to: • Rescue offshore installation personnel from the sea in the event of an emergency, within a short time, via the launching and landing ramp; • Provide first aid treatment for all survivors. A well equipped hospital and treatment room are located close to the rescue zone; • Accommodate all the installation personnel (large rooms are provided on wide alleys); • Act as a central office (with all communication equipment) in emergency situations; • Rescue people out of the water, also very close to an installation. This will be carried out by two or three Fast Rescue Boats (FRBs) which can be easily launched and taken back on board by the conveyor on the ramp under all weather conditions. This is also accomplished by means of two life saving inflatable hoses of about 984 ft. (300 m) in length, which can be floated out from the stern of the SSC by the FRB directly to the installation. Some advantages of t h e launching and landing ramp are that it allows quick launching of one or two rescue boats under all weather conditions, quick and safe berthing of all rescue boats and all other rescue units under all conditions, and quick and safe rescue of large numbers of survivors directly from the water. Further advantages, which result from the propulsion plant's design with two rudder propellers or a Voith-Schneider propeller in the first third of the vessel — reportedly include improved maneuverability, excellent stationkeeping, a "smoothing down" of the sea, and a rescue zone clear of any propeller wash. The vessel will have a rescue deck, a main deck, a forecastle deck with helicopter landing area and a bridge deck. The safety craft can be reduced in length about 11.5 ft. (3.5 m) by placing the rudder propellers between the hulls, and the vessel can be outfitted with firefighting systems and oil pollution response e q u I p m e n t , depending on the owner's choice of vessel applications.




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