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BIG JOHN

JFK Towed to Philadelphia for Storage

By Kathleen Roberts, Naval Sea Systems Command Public Affairs The decommissioned aircraft carrier John F. Kennedy (CV 67) is scheduled to arrive March 22 at the Navy's Inactive Ships Maintenance Facility in for preservation and storage. Due to safety and security concerns, the ship will not be open for tours while in storage in . A contracted tug boat began towing the inactive carrier John F. Kennedy from Norfolk Naval Station on March 17. The ship was originally scheduled to be towed to in August 2007, but was instead towed to while the Navy dredged in the vicinity of Pier 4 to further increase the safety of the ship mooring process and the surrounding waterway. The public may view the carrier's journey up the Delaware River from many locations along the river in , , and . These include Gov. Printz Park in Essington, Pa.; Fox Point State Park in Wilmington, Del.; Ft. DuPont State Park, Del.; New Castle Battery Park in New Castle, Del.; Delaware City State Park, Del.; Red Bank Battlefield, Red Bank, N.J.; other public parks between Cape May and National Park, N.J. John F. Kennedy is currently on the Navy's inactive inventory, meaning the ship has been taken out of commission and laid up for safe storage pending a future SECNAV decision regarding the ultimate disposition of the ship. As required by the fiscal year 2007 National Defense Authorization Act


Navy Tows JFK from Norfolk to Philadelphia for Storage

The decommissioned aircraft carrier ex-John F. Kennedy (CV 67) departed Norfolk Naval Station, , March 17 and is currently in tow to the Navy’s Inactive Ship Maintenance Facility in .  The ship is scheduled to arrive at the Navy’s facility on March 20 for preservation and safe storage until a decision is made by the Secretary of the Navy on the carrier’s final disposition. A contracted tugboat will tow the carrier up the East Coast to via the


Betting Big LNG Rates Will Rise

Gas is big and growing, as rates for LNG hauling tanker rise for a third year, fueled in part by demand from Japan. According to a Bloomberg report, rising Japanese demand means that Golar LNG Ltd., which operates nine LNG tankers and is controlled by John Fredriksen, will report a threefold gain in 2012 net income, according to the mean of 11 analyst estimates in a Bloomberg survey. Golar is reactivating four-decade-old mothballed ships after rates doubled in 2011 and are forecast by


LNG Energy Exporters – U.S. Might Top the World

Tthe U.S. could become the largest exporter of LNG in the world, with reservations, providing ... By 2017 the U.S. could be the largest exporter of liquefied natural gas in the world, surpassing leading LNG exporters Qatar and Australia. There is one big "if," however. America can produce more gas, export a surplus, improve the trade deficit, create jobs, generate taxable profits and reduce its dependence on foreign energy if the marketplace is allowed to work and politics


Saint John NB Sees Season's First Cruise Ship

Carnival Glory: Photo credit Wiki CCL

The first cruise ship of the year, 'Carnival Glory' made its way into Saint John Harbour recently bringing 3,000 guests to the Port City The Carnival Glory is the first of 73 cruise ships that are expected to make a stop in Saint John this summer, informs CBC News. More than 187,000 passengers are expected to visit Saint John between now and the end of October. Melanie Colpitts, a spokesperson with Aquila Tours Inc., said it takes all winter to prepare for their arrival


Fredriksen's Firms See Diverging Fortunes

Rig firm Seadrill sees tough market continuing in 2016. Firms in Norwegian-born billionaire John Fredriksen's empire saw contrasting fortunes on Tuesday, as rig firm Seadrill booked $1.8 billion in writedowns while tanker firm Frontline turned around its fortunes after years of turmoil. The shipping tycoon, nicknamed "Big Wolf" or "Big John" in the shipping industry, controls companies spanning offshore drilling, shipping of oil and dry bulk and salmon farming.


Moore Stephens Recommends Transfer Pricing Review

Shipping companies should take positive action now, if they want to avoid a big U.K. tax bill, say leading accountants Moore Stephens. In the current issue of Moore Stephens' shipping newsletter, the bottom line, Philip Parr, partner, recommends a transfer pricing study to prevent the Inland Revenue from charging international shipping companies, with a UK arm, any additional tax, interest and penalties. Transactions involving associated overseas companies are affected by the new tax


Marine Inland Fabricators Delivers Truckable Tugs

Photo courtesy Marine Inland Fabricators

Marine Inland Fabricators, located in Panama City, Fla, specializes in truckable push boats. The company currently has 21 employees and delivered 26 boats in 2009. So far this year, the company we has built 23 push boats.  Marine Inland Fabricators also builds barges and has built work boats as big as 60 ft by 26 ft by eight ft, two of which are currently working in Lake Ponchartrain in New Orleans, La.  We recently filled a seventeen boat order for General Electric to work in the


Long Beach's Green Port Policy Turns 10

Photo: Port of Long Beach

The Long Beach Board of Harbor Commissioners celebrated the 10th anniversary of the Port of Long Beach’s Green Port Policy by honoring its originators and reaffirming their commitment to environmental sustainability.   Adopted on January 31, 2005, the Green Port Policy is a pledge to protect air, water, community and wildlife, and to consider the environment in all of its day-to-day activities. According to the port


Genco Shipping Posts Loss in 2015

Photo: Genco Shipping & Trading Limited

 US-headquartered ship owner Genco Shipping & Trading Limited suffered a massive loss for 2015 just like the rest of the industry. However, the result represents a big improvement from the losses in 2014.   Dry bulk carrier has managed to decrease its net loss to USD 49.5 million in the fourth quarter of 2015, compared to a net loss of USD 164 million seen in the corresponding period a year earlier.  


Ships Worsen Air Pollution Over China, Killing Thousands

Photo courtesy of IMO

A boom in shipping is aggravating air pollution in China and other nations in East Asia, causing thousands of deaths a year in a region with eight of the world's 10 biggest container ports, scientists said on Monday.   Often overlooked compared to cars and factories that are far bigger


Post-Brexit Exclusion From EU Ports Plan Could Help British Terminals

British ports could gain a competitive edge in tough shipping markets through post-Brexit exclusion from planned European Union regulation of the sector, leading British port officials told Reuters.   Last month's vote to leave the EU means that British terminals are set to escape the


Seaborne Transportation - Economy Without Borders

Graph: Clarksons Research

 With seaborne transportation accounting for the vast majority of the world’s international trade, the importance of the shipping industry to the mechanics of the world economy is generally fairly evident, says Clarksons Research.  


ASEAN Breaks South China Sea Deadlock

Manila drops request to refer to court ruling in statement. Southeast Asian nations overcame days of deadlock on Monday when the Philippines dropped a request for their joint statement to mention a landmark legal ruling on the South China Sea, officials said, after objections from Cambodia.


Big News For Bigger Boxships

Graph: Clarksons Research

 With the locks at the Panama Canal up and running for commercial business, the focus falls on the containership sector, with the capability to allow the transit of larger boxships one of the key aims of the canal expansion project. Clarksons Research Analysis.  


Panama's Expanded Canal Attracts Biz and Tourists

Photo: Panama Canal Authority

 Recent expansion of the Panama Canal should lower shipping costs, say market observers. Shipping geeks will delight at this engineering marvel that revolutionized global maritime trade.   As a major Latin American hub of finance, commerce and transportation


Pacific International Lines Chose HAROPA

Logo

Since June 2016, the Singaporean shipping line Pacific International Lines (PIL) has marketed a weekly containerised service (20’/40’/40’HC and reefer) from HAROPA - Port of Le Havre and bound for the South Pacific area. The service notably makes stops in Australia, New Zealand


US Oil Drillers Add Rigs for 5th Week in 6

U.S. drillers this week added oil rigs for a fifth week in six, according to a closely followed report Friday, prompting analysts to predict the rig count has bottomed and production will start to edge up early next year.   Drillers added 10 oil rigs in the week to July 8


Can You Farm Fish Inside a Cargo Ship?

Photo: Marine Harvest ASA

 The world’s biggest Atlantic salmon producer wants to start farming fish inside a ship – and the idea has merit, says a report in IOL.   Building traditional fish farms on the open water in Norway has become almost impossible because of state rules intended to curb


This Day In Naval History: July 11

(Official U.S. Navy photo by Joan M. Zopf, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection)

1798 - President John Adams signs an act that reestablishes the Marine Corps under the Constitution. The following day, Maj. William W. Burrows is appointed Commandant of the Marine Corps.   1918 - Henry Ford launches the first of the 100 intended Eagle boats


Virginia Port throughput a Modest 2.57 Mi TEUs

Courtesy Port of Virginia

 Driven by strong imports, The Port of Virginia handled 216,672 twenty-foot equivalent units (TEUs) in its strongest June cargo performance on record that helped to push the port to a solid finish for fiscal year 2016. “We finished fiscal year 2016 in positive territory


UK Convicts Captain, First Mate of Drug Trafficking

(Photo: NCA)

The captain and first officer of an ocean going tug boat have been found guilty of drug trafficking following the biggest ever U.K. seizure of class A drugs, the country’s National Crime Agency (NCA) announced.   The cocaine, worth an estimated potential street value of £512


This Day In Naval History: July 14

1813 - During the War of 1812, Lt. John M. Gamble becomes the first Marine to command a ship in battle, USS Greenwich, when she captures British whaling ship Seringapatam.    1853 - Commodore Matthew C. Perry lands and holds the first meeting with the Japanese at Uraga


Biden Visits Stennis

Vice President Joe Biden with Sailors in the hangar bay aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) during the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise, the worlds largest international maritime exercise. RIMPAC provides a unique training opportunity that helps participants foster and sustain the cooperative relationships that are critical to ensuring the safety of sea lanes and security on the worlds oceans. (U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Luke MoyerReleased)

Vice President Joe Biden visited the Sailors aboard USS John C. Stennis (CVN 74) July 14, while the ship and John C. Stennis Strike Group (JCSSG) were participating in the Rim of the Pacific maritime exercise. The visit, which occurred just one day before the six-month mark of their current


China Admiral: 'Freedom of Navigation Patrols' could end 'in disaster'

Freedom of navigation patrols carried out by foreign navies in the South China Sea could end "in disaster", a senior Chinese admiral has said, a warning to the United States after last week's ruling against Beijing's claims in the area.






 
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