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Disabled Fishing Vessel Rescued Off Nantucket

Coast Guard crews aboard cutters Escanaba and Hammerhead brought the disabled fishing vessel Challenge to shore August 16. (U.S. Coast Guard photo)

U.S. Coast Guard rescues disabled fishing vessel 70 miles from Nantucket   A disabled fishing vessel was brought in safely to shore early Monday by U.S. Coast Guard crews aboard the cutters Escanaba and Hammerhead.   Watchstanders at the Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England Command Center in Woods Hole, Mass. received a phone call from the captain of the vessel Challenger Sunday morning, stating a line had fouled their propeller, and they were disabled and adrift 70 miles southeast of Nantucket, Mass.    Search and rescue coordinators from the Sector Southeastern New England command center diverted the Coast Guard Cutter Escanaba and Hammerhead to assist.    The crew of the Escanaba arrived on scene and took the vessel, loaded with 650 pounds of scallops, in a stern tow at 9:30 a.m., Sunday. Later, at about 1 p.m. the crew of the Hammerhead relieved the Escanaba and continued to bring the fishing vessel toward shore.    At around 7:30 a.m., Monday, the crew of the Hammerhead handed off tow to a commercial tow company and the Challenge was brought to harbor in New Bedford, Mass.    "We had a few different crews working together with the Challenge's crew to complete two different towing evolutions," said Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Richardson, the operations unit coordinator at Sector Southeastern New England

Rigdon Marine Christens Fast Supply Vessel

Billy Guice, Vice President of Sales and Marketing of Rigdon Marine Corporation (RMC), announced the christening and delivery of the Hammerhead, the first of four proprietary FSV (fast supply vessels) the company is building. Mrs. Shelley Puckett, wife of Mike Puckett, a Vessel Manager for RMC, christened the 181-ft. FSV prior to its deployment in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico. The Hammerhead is a 181x 34-ft., 7,200-hp, DP-1 FSV, which features a capacity of 1,001 barrels of liquid mud

C&G Yard Crowded with Crewboats

Pictured are Rigdon's Hammerhead and Alioth crew boats on the left and two Tidewater crewboats to the right. Following hard on the heels of the recently delivered M/V Gayla Graham, C&G Boat Works has multiple vessels in all stages of construction with still more on the order books. The firm’s 12-acre yard in Mobile, Ala., is packed with vessels. Four crewboats are currently lined up along the riverside in various states of completion with several more hulls coming together in the

Study: O&G Setback Cost U.S. Jobs

A new study released today by the National Ocean Industries Association (NOIA) and the American Petroleum Institute (API) shows the important nationwide jobs and economic impact of the Gulf of Mexico offshore oil and gas industry and reveals the effect of permitting on those figures. According to the study conducted by Quest Offshore Inc., the Gulf offshore oil and gas industry supported more than 240,000 jobs across the country while contributing more than $26 billion to the

Fishermen – Leave Sharks & Stingrays Alone!

Thirty-seven countries, including US & Mexico propose to list ten shark & ray species under international wildlife treaty. At least 37 countries, including the United States and Mexico, have proposed protections for ten shark and ray species under the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES). The U.S. will join Colombia in leading an effort to secure trade measures for the oceanic whitetip shark.

USCG Assists Sinking Vessel East of Nantucket

Coast Guard Cutter-Sanibel1

  The Coast Guard is responding to a fishing boat taking on water 130 miles east of Nantucket, Massachusetts, Saturday. At about 12:45 a.m., the fishing vessel Athena’s crew reported to Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England watchstanders in Woods Hole, Massachusetts, that the Miss Shauna, a 51-foot fishing boat with seven people aboard, was taking on water through a hole in the boat’s engine room

News: Barge/Refinery Explosion Shakes Staten Island, NY

The maritime industry makes local headlines when something goes wrong, but the headlines on February 21 went national. In a spectucular eruption of flame and smoke, the like of which New York had not seen since 9/11, an estimated million gallons of gasoline erupted from a barge near the southwestern tip of Staten Island. The barge captain and mate were killed in the 10 A.M. explosion, and a nearby worker at the ExxonMobil facility suffered third-degree burns

Fugro Places ROV Contract with ISE

ISE has received a contract from Fugro Chance Inc. to update their Hammerhead ROV with current technologies. The ROV frame with 5000 meter foam pack has been delivered to ISE, and will be outfitted with an ISE 150HP propulsion system, ISE control system and an electric power system. The propulsion system will include two redundant 75 hp hydraulic power units, hydraulic control units, proportional valve packs, thrusters control units, and eight thrusters

Bollinger Appoints Bowen to Head Patrol Boat Program

Charles Skip Bowen

Bollinger Shipyards appointed Charles "Skip" Bowen as Program Manager for the FRC “Sentinel” Class Patrol Boat building program at Bollinger’s Lockport facility. Bowen joins Bollinger following a 32 year career with the United States Coast Guard, culminating with the rank of Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard, from 2006 to 2010.  As the Master Chief Petty Officer of the Coast Guard, Skip served as a senior advisor to the Commandant of the Coast Guard

USCG Assists Distressed Vessel off Massachusetts

U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) rescue crews assisted a fishing vessel in distress by air-dropping de-watering pumps after the 53-foot Canadian flagged vessel Island Cruiser collided with the 120-foot converted ferry vessel Esperanza June 26, 2014. Watchstanders at Sector Southeastern New England received notification that the Island Cruiser was being towed by the Esperanza and the tow broke causing the collision and resulting in a hole above the water line on its port quarter.


By Don Sutherland How much water has flowed under the bridge since 1938? Well, for starters, the bridge itself - in this case, the Verrazano-Narrows - wasn't even built yet. We had no PCs, no CDs, no LPs, not even TVs in 1938. Manhattan's shore ended at West Street

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