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WAR ADMIRAL

USN to Decommission 11 Ships

USS Klakring: Photo credit USN

Frigates, cruisers and an aircraft carrier will be decommissioned by US Navy US warships, eleven in number comprising six frigates, four cruisers and an aircraft carrier are set to be decommissioned during fiscal 2013, according to a Navy message released by Deputy Chief of Naval Operations Vice-Admiral John Blake, which includes deactivation dates and the fates of the ships. The six frigates will be sold to foreign militaries, while the four cruisers will be dismantled. USS Enterprise, the world’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the oldest active-duty warship in the fleet, will move to a shipyard March 15, next year. There, it will await a date for decommissioning. Next ship in the program to be taken out of service is the frigate USS Klakring, built in 1982 by the Bath Ironworks Corp in Maine sponsored by a nephew of Rear Admiral Thomas B. Klakring who was awarded three Navy Crosses as a submarine commander during World War ll. The gas-turbine powered, single screw ship was notable earlier in her life as the first air-capable, air-embarking ship in the Navy.  


Navy's Efforts Focus on A-P Region & Arabian Gulf Says CNO

ADM Greenert at the Hearing: USN Photo

By operating from forward locations, the Navy and Marine Corps provide President Barack Obama with options to deal promptly with global contingencies, Navy Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, the chief of naval operations (CNO) explained during a hearing of the House Appropriations Committee's defense sub-committee, adding that Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James F. Amos is "a great shipmate." "As we conclude over a decade of wars and bring our ground forces home from extended


This Day in Coast Guard History – October 13

1775-This is the date that the Navy recognizes as it's "official" birthday.  The United States Navy traces its origins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on 13 October 1775 by authorizing the procurement, fitting out, manning, and dispatch of two armed vessels to cruise in search of munitions ships supplying the British Army in America. The legislation also established a Naval Committee to supervise the work


'Don't Give up the Ship' Flag to be Presented by Perry Group

Descendants of Oliver Hazard Perry to present "Don't Give up the Ship" flag to Navy Rear Admiral Greg Nosal aboard 'USS De Wert' In a symbolic transfer of command, the direct descendants of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry will present Navy Rear Admiral Greg Nosal with the "Don't Give up the Ship" flag in a Longboat Rowing ceremony hosted by the Perry Group at the Port of Cleveland on Aug. 30, 2012.


Today in U.S. Naval History: June 20

Battle of Philippine Sea (WikiCommons)

Today in U.S. Naval History - June 20 1813 - Fifteen U.S. gunboats engage three British ships in Hampton Roads, Va. 1815 - Trials of Fulton I, built by Robert Fulton, are completed in New York. This ship would become the Navy's first steam-driven warship. 1898 - U.S. forces occupied Guam, which became first colony of U.S. in the Pacific. 1913 - First fatal accident in Naval Aviation, ENS W. D. Billingsley killed at Annapolis, Md.


100 Yrs Since Departure of Australian Expeditionary Force from Sydney

CoA_Logo

  On 19 August 1914, an Australian expeditionary force sailed out of Sydney Harbour bound for German New Guinea. The departure was barely 15 days after Britain's declaration of war on Germany. Enlistment of the infantry based Army contingent was completed at Victoria Barracks, Paddington and further preparation and training occurred at the nearby Agricultural Showgrounds. The over 1,000 strong contingent of soldiers would later march down Oxford


Admiral Loy, Grace Allen Receive Silver Bell Honors

Some of the industry's biggest players and supporters were present to honor Admiral James Loy and Grace Allen at the 26th Annual Silver Bell Awards Dinner on June 17 at Chelsea Piers in Manhattan. Also recognized, was John J. McMullen, renowned naval architect and marine engineer, and former CEO of United States Lines, who received a Lifetime Achievement Award. The event, which is one of the industry's top social and philanthropic events of the season, drew a record 954 guests


This Day in Naval History – Dec. 2

1775 - Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 - Rear Admiral William S. Cowles submits report, prepared by LT George C. Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation mission to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 - First Naval Armed Guard detachment (7 men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne. 1944 - Two-day destroyer Battle of Ormoc Bay begins.


Bentley to be Feted by National Maritime Historical Society

Photo courtesy BSY Associates Inc.

Helen Delich Bentley will be an honoree at the National Maritime Historical Society's Washington Annual Award Dinner beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 13, at the National Press Club, 529 14th St., NW, Washington, DC, 20045. A former chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission and five-term U.S. Congresswoman representing Maryland's 2nd Congressional District, Bentley's history of advocacy for the Port of Baltimore was highlighted in 2006 when the Port was officially renamed The Helen


Commander: Despite Government Shutdown, U.S. Navy Must Carry On

Commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command Adm. Bill Gortney delivers remarks during the rollout ceremony for the U.S. Navys first F-35C Lightning II carrier variant aircraft squadron the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin by Angel DelCueto/Released)

U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) commander, Admiral Bill Gortney, directed that the Fleet will continue to provide ready forces to safeguard national security during the government shutdown, but limit activities to only those that are absolutely necessary to safely accomplish currently assigned excepted missions. His guidance referenced instructions provided in a memo from the Deputy Secretary of Defense that stated "The Department will, of course, continue to prosecute the war in Afghanistan


This Day In Naval History: September 16

1814 - A squadron from the schooner USS Carolina attacks and raids the base of the pirate Jean Lafitte, at Barataria, La., capturing six schooners and other small craft while the pirates flee the attack.   1823 - Samuel Southard becomes the seventh Secretary of the Navy


Helicopter Carrier Delivered to the Egyptian Navy

LHD Anwar El Sadat (Photo: DCNS)

French industrial group DCNS has delivered LHD (Landing Helicopter Dock) Anwar El Sadat, the second of two helicopter carriers acquired by the Arab Republic of Egypt.   The flag transfer ceremony took place September 16, 2016 in the presence of the two Chiefs of Staff of the Egyptian and


Operation Render Safe Brings Safety to Solomon Islands

The ongoing menace of explosive remnants of war will again be tackled in the Solomon Islands by the multinational team assigned to Operation Render Safe 16

The dangers posed by explosive remnants of war in the Solomon Islands will again be tackled with the commencement of Operation Render Safe 16 over the weekend.   The annual ADF-led Operation Render Safe deployment is Australia’s enduring commitment to the removal of unexploded and


Medal of Honor for Two Destroyers

A graphic representation of the future USS Jack H. Lucas (DDG 125)

In a ceremony at Vaught-Hemingway Stadium, Secretary of the Navy Ray Mabus announced Arleigh Burke-class destroyer, DDG 125, will be named Jack H. Lucas in honor of the Marine Corps hero and Medal of Honor recipient. Mabus also announced that DDG 126 would be named Louis H. Wilson Jr


This Day In Naval History: August 24

USS Essex (LHD 2) (U.S. Navy photo)

1814 - During the War of 1812, the British invade Md. and burn Washington, D.C. Commodore Thomas Tingey, superintendent of the Washington Navy Yard, burns the Navy Yard to prevent British access during the invasion. 1862 - During the Civil War, Capt


Navy Discovers Malaysian Tanker

MT Vier Harmoni . Photo: Vierlines Commercial Division

 Indonesia's navy has found a tanker carrying almost US$400,000 worth of diesel that was taken by its own crew last week due to a commercial dispute, says a report in AFP.   The navy said in a statement that the MT Vier Harmoni with 10 Indonesian crewmen was found off West Kalimantan


This Day In Naval History: August 29

USS Decatur (DDG 73) (U.S. Navy photo)

1861 - During the Civil War, Seaman Benjamin Swearer lands with troops from the steam sloop of war, Pawnee, and takes part in the capture of Fort Clark, at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. He serves throughout the action and has the honor of being the first man to raise the flag on the captured fort


This Day In Naval History: August 30

USS Colorado (BB 45) (Photo: USNHC, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center)

1923 - USS Colorado (BB 45) is commissioned. Notable during her pre-World War II service, she helps in the search for missing aviator, Amelia Earhart, in 1937. During WWII, USS Colorado serves in the Pacific during World War II and is hit by kamikazes at Leyte in November 1944.  


Russia Honours First British Arctic Convoy, 75 Years On

British and Russian World War Two veterans gathered on Wednesday in Arkhangelsk, 75 years to the day since Britain's first Arctic convoy of military supplies steamed into the northern port.   Britain's Princess Anne has been among those attending events honouring those who sailed


This Day In Naval History: September 1

1800 - During the Quasi-War with France, the schooner, USS Experiment, commanded by Lt. Charles Stewart, captures the French privateer Deux Amix off Barbuda, West Indies.   1814 - The sloop-of-war, USS Wasp, commanded by Johnston Blakely, sinks the British brig sloop, HMS Avon


This Day In Naval History: September 2

USS Sentry (MCM 3) (U.S. Navy photo by Johnny Bivera)

1777 - The frigate, USS Raleigh, commanded by Thomas Thompson, captures the British brig, HMS Nancy, while en route to France to purchase military stores.   1864 - During the Civil War, the 8-gun paddle-wheeler, USS Naiad, engages a Confederate battery at Rowes Landing, La., and silences it


This Day In Naval History: September 6

Poster courtesy of Lockheed Martin

1861 - USS Tyler and USS Lexington, support Gen. Ulysses S. Grants Army operations against strategic Paducah and Smithland, Ky. The ships mobile firepower assists in the capture of the cities, helping to preserve Kentucky in the Union. 1918 - In the first use of major-caliber naval guns in a


This Day In Naval History: September 7

Sailors assigned to attack submarine Minnesota (SSN-783) man the rails after the order to bring the ship to life is given during the commissioning ceremony for Minnesota.  (U.S. Navy photos by Andrew Schneide)

1775 - During the American Revolution, the British supply ship Unity is taken by the Continental schooner, Hannah, paid for by Army Gen. George Washington. It is the first prize taken by a Continental vessel.   1776 - David Bushnells submarine Turtle is used by Sgt


This Day In Naval History: September 13

Christening Ceremony of the Cheyenne (SSN-773) (Photo by Jim Hemeon, courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat)

1803 - Commodore John Barry dies at Philadelphia, Pa., having served in numerous commands and over vessels in the Continental Navy during the American Revolution and in the newly formed U.S. Navy.    1814 - During the War of 1812


This Day In Naval History: September 14

1814 - During the War of 1812, the sloop-of-war, Wasp captures and burns the British merchant brig, HMS Bacchus, in the Atlantic. A week later, she captures the brig, Atlanta.   1899 - During the Philippine Insurrection Campaign, the gunboat, USS Concord, and the monitor, USS Monterey






 
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