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WAR ADMIRAL

USN to Decommission 11 Ships

USS Klakring: Photo credit USN

Frigates, cruisers and an aircraft carrier will be decommissioned by US Navy US warships, eleven in number comprising six frigates, four cruisers and an aircraft carrier are set to be decommissioned during fiscal 2013, according to a Navy message released by Deputy Chief of Naval Operations Vice-Admiral John Blake, which includes deactivation dates and the fates of the ships. The six frigates will be sold to foreign militaries, while the four cruisers will be dismantled. USS Enterprise, the world’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the oldest active-duty warship in the fleet, will move to a shipyard March 15, next year. There, it will await a date for decommissioning. Next ship in the program to be taken out of service is the frigate USS Klakring, built in 1982 by the Bath Ironworks Corp in Maine sponsored by a nephew of Rear Admiral Thomas B. Klakring who was awarded three Navy Crosses as a submarine commander during World War ll. The gas-turbine powered, single screw ship was notable earlier in her life as the first air-capable, air-embarking ship in the Navy.  


Navy's Efforts Focus on A-P Region & Arabian Gulf Says CNO

ADM Greenert at the Hearing: USN Photo

By operating from forward locations, the Navy and Marine Corps provide President Barack Obama with options to deal promptly with global contingencies, Navy Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, the chief of naval operations (CNO) explained during a hearing of the House Appropriations Committee's defense sub-committee, adding that Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James F. Amos is "a great shipmate." "As we conclude over a decade of wars and bring our ground forces home from extended


This Day in Naval History – Dec. 2

1775 - Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 - Rear Admiral William S. Cowles submits report, prepared by LT George C. Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation mission to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 - First Naval Armed Guard detachment (7 men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne. 1944 - Two-day destroyer Battle of Ormoc Bay begins.


This Day in Coast Guard History – October 13

1775-This is the date that the Navy recognizes as it's "official" birthday.  The United States Navy traces its origins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on 13 October 1775 by authorizing the procurement, fitting out, manning, and dispatch of two armed vessels to cruise in search of munitions ships supplying the British Army in America. The legislation also established a Naval Committee to supervise the work


'Don't Give up the Ship' Flag to be Presented by Perry Group

Descendants of Oliver Hazard Perry to present "Don't Give up the Ship" flag to Navy Rear Admiral Greg Nosal aboard 'USS De Wert' In a symbolic transfer of command, the direct descendants of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry will present Navy Rear Admiral Greg Nosal with the "Don't Give up the Ship" flag in a Longboat Rowing ceremony hosted by the Perry Group at the Port of Cleveland on Aug. 30, 2012.


100 Yrs Since Departure of Australian Expeditionary Force from Sydney

CoA_Logo

  On 19 August 1914, an Australian expeditionary force sailed out of Sydney Harbour bound for German New Guinea. The departure was barely 15 days after Britain's declaration of war on Germany. Enlistment of the infantry based Army contingent was completed at Victoria Barracks, Paddington and further preparation and training occurred at the nearby Agricultural Showgrounds. The over 1,000 strong contingent of soldiers would later march down Oxford


Admiral Loy, Grace Allen Receive Silver Bell Honors

Some of the industry's biggest players and supporters were present to honor Admiral James Loy and Grace Allen at the 26th Annual Silver Bell Awards Dinner on June 17 at Chelsea Piers in Manhattan. Also recognized, was John J. McMullen, renowned naval architect and marine engineer, and former CEO of United States Lines, who received a Lifetime Achievement Award. The event, which is one of the industry's top social and philanthropic events of the season, drew a record 954 guests


Bentley to be Feted by National Maritime Historical Society

Photo courtesy BSY Associates Inc.

Helen Delich Bentley will be an honoree at the National Maritime Historical Society's Washington Annual Award Dinner beginning at 6 p.m. Wednesday, April 13, at the National Press Club, 529 14th St., NW, Washington, DC, 20045. A former chairman of the Federal Maritime Commission and five-term U.S. Congresswoman representing Maryland's 2nd Congressional District, Bentley's history of advocacy for the Port of Baltimore was highlighted in 2006 when the Port was officially renamed The Helen


Commander: Despite Government Shutdown, U.S. Navy Must Carry On

Commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command Adm. Bill Gortney delivers remarks during the rollout ceremony for the U.S. Navys first F-35C Lightning II carrier variant aircraft squadron the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin by Angel DelCueto/Released)

U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) commander, Admiral Bill Gortney, directed that the Fleet will continue to provide ready forces to safeguard national security during the government shutdown, but limit activities to only those that are absolutely necessary to safely accomplish currently assigned excepted missions. His guidance referenced instructions provided in a memo from the Deputy Secretary of Defense that stated "The Department will, of course, continue to prosecute the war in Afghanistan


Today in U.S. Naval History: June 20

Battle of Philippine Sea (WikiCommons)

Today in U.S. Naval History - June 20 1813 - Fifteen U.S. gunboats engage three British ships in Hampton Roads, Va. 1815 - Trials of Fulton I, built by Robert Fulton, are completed in New York. This ship would become the Navy's first steam-driven warship. 1898 - U.S. forces occupied Guam, which became first colony of U.S. in the Pacific. 1913 - First fatal accident in Naval Aviation, ENS W. D. Billingsley killed at Annapolis, Md.


Russia Ramps Up Its Military Presence In The Arctic

Photo: Russian Military (mil.ru)

 A new era of dominance in a polar region opening up. The size and scale of Russia's military activities in the Arctic are producing negative perceptions and growing suspicion in the West.   UPI reports that  Russia, long seen as an aggressive and unpredictable bear in


Researchers to Visit ‘Battle of the Atlantic’ Wreckage

Sonar image of the German submarine U-576. (Credit: NOAA & SRI International)

Researchers from the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and its partners are set to visit what remains of two ships—a German U-boat and a Nicaraguan freighter – which sank off Cape Hatteras during World War II’s “Battle of the Atlantic


This Day In Naval History: August 24

USS Essex (LHD 2) (U.S. Navy photo)

1814 - During the War of 1812, the British invade Md. and burn Washington, D.C. Commodore Thomas Tingey, superintendent of the Washington Navy Yard, burns the Navy Yard to prevent British access during the invasion. 1862 - During the Civil War, Capt


Navy Discovers Malaysian Tanker

MT Vier Harmoni . Photo: Vierlines Commercial Division

 Indonesia's navy has found a tanker carrying almost US$400,000 worth of diesel that was taken by its own crew last week due to a commercial dispute, says a report in AFP.   The navy said in a statement that the MT Vier Harmoni with 10 Indonesian crewmen was found off West Kalimantan


This Day In Naval History - July 29

Maine (SSBN-741) Commissioning Program signed by the SECNAV. (Courtesy of Chester O. Morris)

1846 - During the Mexican-American War, a detachment of Marines and Sailors, led by Arm. Col. John C. Fremont from the sloop USS Cyane, commanded by Cmdr. Samuel F. DuPont, lands and takes possession of San Diego and raises the U.S. flag.  


Keel Laid for USNS Hershel 'Woody' Williams

Photo: General Dynamics NASSCO

U.S. shipbuilder General Dynamics NASSCO hosted a keel laying ceremony on Tuesday, August 2 for the U.S. Navy’s second Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) the future USNS Hershel “Woody” Williams currently under construction at the builder’s San Diego shipyard.  


This Day In Naval History: August 4

USS Enterprise (CV-6) (Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives)

1790 - The Revenue Cutter Service is established by Congress, authorizing the construction of 10 vessels to enforce federal tariff and trade laws and prevent smuggling. The service receives its present name, U.S. Coast Guard, in 1915 under an act of Congress that merges the Revenue Cutter Service


Converted OPVs Delivered to the Bangladesh Coast Guard

Photo: Fincantieri

The first Minerva class corvettes, decommissioned by the Italian Navy, have been converted   Fincantieri has delivered today at its shipyard in Muggiano, La Spezia the first two units part of the supply contract of four Offshore Patrol Vessels (OPV), to the Bangladesh Coast Guard (BCG)


US Coast Guard Barque Eagle Sails to New York

Coast Guard Cutter Eagle sails into New York, Thursday, August 4 (Photo: Jeff OMalley)

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle sailed into New York City, Thursday, as part of a voyage commemorating 70-years since the original journey from northern Germany to New York.   The historic Eagle – the only active commissioned sailing vessel in the U.S


New Diving Training Ship Delivered to Tunisia

Photo: Franco Ortolani

The Tunisian government has taken delivery of a new training ship, Zarzis A710, which will support diving and security works in air and sea areas of the Mediterranean. The vessel was built by Vittoria Shipyard SpA and commissioned by the Tunisian Defense Ministry as part of the Tunisian-Italian


This Day In Naval History: August 8

USS Fort McHenry (LSD 43) (U.S. Navy photo)

1860 - Screw frigate USS San Jacinto, commanded by Capt. William M. Armstrong, captures the American slaver Storm King with 619 slaves on board, off the Congo River. A prize crew from the steam frigate sailed the captured slaver to Monrovia and turned 616 freed Negroes over to the United States


This Day In Naval History: August 9

USS Sterett (DDG 104) (U.S. Navy photo by Kevin S. OBrien)

1842 - The Webster-Ashburton Treaty is signed. In the treaty, the United States and Great Britain agree to cooperate in suppressing the slave trade.   1867 - One officer and 46 Marines and Seamen from the steamer, USS Wachusett, land at Shanghai, China, to assist in fighting a fire.


This Day In Naval History: August 11

USNS Benavidez (T-AKR-306) underway (Photo: U.S. Navy)

1861 - USS Penguin, commanded by Cmdr. John L. Livingston, engages blockade-runner Louisa during the Civil War. The blockade-runner hits a sandbar near Cape Fear, N.C., and sinks. 1877 - Prof. Asaph Hall of the U.S. Naval Observatory discovers the first of two satellites of Mars


Italy Raises Security Level at Tourist Ports

Photo: Naples Port Authority

Italy raised the security level at its tourist ports on Thursday, a coastguard spokesman said, meaning intensified controls of people and vehicles during the height of the summer tourist season. Coastguard Admiral Vincenzo Melone sent a letter ordering passenger and cruise-ship ports to raise


This Day In Naval History: August 16

Seadragon (SSN-584) is launched on August 16, 1958 (USN photo)

1822 - USS Grampus investigates and pursues a brig flying Spanish colors. When called upon to surrender, the privateer brig Palmyra from Puerto Rico fires cannon and musket fire. USS Grampus fires back on Palmyras broadsides reducing Palmyras rigging to a complete wreck






 
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