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WAR ADMIRAL

USN to Decommission 11 Ships

USS Klakring: Photo credit USN

Frigates, cruisers and an aircraft carrier will be decommissioned by US Navy US warships, eleven in number comprising six frigates, four cruisers and an aircraft carrier are set to be decommissioned during fiscal 2013, according to a Navy message released by Deputy Chief of Naval Operations Vice-Admiral John Blake, which includes deactivation dates and the fates of the ships. The six frigates will be sold to foreign militaries, while the four cruisers will be dismantled. USS Enterprise, the world’s first nuclear-powered aircraft carrier and the oldest active-duty warship in the fleet, will move to a shipyard March 15, next year. There, it will await a date for decommissioning. Next ship in the program to be taken out of service is the frigate USS Klakring, built in 1982 by the Bath Ironworks Corp in Maine sponsored by a nephew of Rear Admiral Thomas B. Klakring who was awarded three Navy Crosses as a submarine commander during World War ll. The gas-turbine powered, single screw ship was notable earlier in her life as the first air-capable, air-embarking ship in the Navy.  


Navy's Efforts Focus on A-P Region & Arabian Gulf Says CNO

ADM Greenert at the Hearing: USN Photo

By operating from forward locations, the Navy and Marine Corps provide President Barack Obama with options to deal promptly with global contingencies, Navy Adm. Jonathan W. Greenert, the chief of naval operations (CNO) explained during a hearing of the House Appropriations Committee's defense sub-committee, adding that Marine Corps Commandant Gen. James F. Amos is "a great shipmate." "As we conclude over a decade of wars and bring our ground forces home from extended


100 Yrs Since Departure of Australian Expeditionary Force from Sydney

CoA_Logo

  On 19 August 1914, an Australian expeditionary force sailed out of Sydney Harbour bound for German New Guinea. The departure was barely 15 days after Britain's declaration of war on Germany. Enlistment of the infantry based Army contingent was completed at Victoria Barracks, Paddington and further preparation and training occurred at the nearby Agricultural Showgrounds. The over 1,000 strong contingent of soldiers would later march down Oxford


This Day in Coast Guard History – October 13

1775-This is the date that the Navy recognizes as it's "official" birthday.  The United States Navy traces its origins to the Continental Navy, which the Continental Congress established on 13 October 1775 by authorizing the procurement, fitting out, manning, and dispatch of two armed vessels to cruise in search of munitions ships supplying the British Army in America. The legislation also established a Naval Committee to supervise the work


'Don't Give up the Ship' Flag to be Presented by Perry Group

Descendants of Oliver Hazard Perry to present "Don't Give up the Ship" flag to Navy Rear Admiral Greg Nosal aboard 'USS De Wert' In a symbolic transfer of command, the direct descendants of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry will present Navy Rear Admiral Greg Nosal with the "Don't Give up the Ship" flag in a Longboat Rowing ceremony hosted by the Perry Group at the Port of Cleveland on Aug. 30, 2012.


This Day in Naval History – Dec. 2

1775 - Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 - Rear Admiral William S. Cowles submits report, prepared by LT George C. Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation mission to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 - First Naval Armed Guard detachment (7 men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne. 1944 - Two-day destroyer Battle of Ormoc Bay begins.


Today in U.S. Naval History: June 20

Battle of Philippine Sea (WikiCommons)

Today in U.S. Naval History - June 20 1813 - Fifteen U.S. gunboats engage three British ships in Hampton Roads, Va. 1815 - Trials of Fulton I, built by Robert Fulton, are completed in New York. This ship would become the Navy's first steam-driven warship. 1898 - U.S. forces occupied Guam, which became first colony of U.S. in the Pacific. 1913 - First fatal accident in Naval Aviation, ENS W. D. Billingsley killed at Annapolis, Md.


Admiral Loy, Grace Allen Receive Silver Bell Honors

Some of the industry's biggest players and supporters were present to honor Admiral James Loy and Grace Allen at the 26th Annual Silver Bell Awards Dinner on June 17 at Chelsea Piers in Manhattan. Also recognized, was John J. McMullen, renowned naval architect and marine engineer, and former CEO of United States Lines, who received a Lifetime Achievement Award. The event, which is one of the industry's top social and philanthropic events of the season, drew a record 954 guests


Commander: Despite Government Shutdown, U.S. Navy Must Carry On

Commander of U.S. Fleet Forces Command Adm. Bill Gortney delivers remarks during the rollout ceremony for the U.S. Navys first F-35C Lightning II carrier variant aircraft squadron the Grim Reapers of Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 101. (U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Lockheed Martin by Angel DelCueto/Released)

U.S. Fleet Forces (USFF) commander, Admiral Bill Gortney, directed that the Fleet will continue to provide ready forces to safeguard national security during the government shutdown, but limit activities to only those that are absolutely necessary to safely accomplish currently assigned excepted missions. His guidance referenced instructions provided in a memo from the Deputy Secretary of Defense that stated "The Department will, of course, continue to prosecute the war in Afghanistan


Rear Admiral Hereth to Lead Rita Effort

President George W. Bush has declared under the Stafford Act that an emergency exists in the State of Texas and the State of Louisiana, and ordered federal aid to supplement State and local response and recovery efforts in the areas affected by Hurricane Rita. That declaration effectively characterizes Hurricane Rita as an Incident of National Significance under the National Response Plan (NRP). In accordance with the guidance provided in the NRP


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 22

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 22 1912 - Birthday of Dental Corps 1945 - First surrender of Japanese garrison at end of World War II; USS Levy receives surrender of Mille Atoll in Marshall Islands 1980 - USS Passumpsic rescues 28 Vietnamese refugees


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 19

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 19 1812 - USS Constitution captures HMS Guerriere. 1812- Devastating hurricane struck the Navy's New Orleans station, delaying military preparations in the War of 1812 1818 - Capt. James Biddle takes possession of Oregon Territory for U.S.


Drug Busting Darwin Returns from Middle East

HMAS_Darwin

  The crew responsible for intercepting and destroying billions of dollars worth of narcotics, including the largest seizure of heroin in the history of the Combined Maritime Forces, has returned home. HMAS Darwin and her 232 person crew docked at Garden Island


Admiral Vladimirsky on Round-the-world Voyage

  On 18 August, the Admiral Vladimirsky oceanographic research ship of the Baltic Fleet will leave St. Petersburg and then set sail on an unprecedented round-the-world voyage. "The Russian Navy, after more than 30 years, is returning to round-the-world voyages


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 15

USS Lexington (CVA-16). (Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center)

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 15 1845 - U.S. Naval Academy established at Annapolis, Md. on former site of Fort Severn. 1895 - Commissioning of Texas, the first American steel-hulled battleship. Texas served off Cuba during the Spanish-American War and took part in the naval battle of


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 14

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 14 1813 - HMS Pelican captures USS Argus 1886 - SECNAV establishes Naval Gun Factory at Washington Navy Yard 1945 - Japan agrees to surrender; last Japanese ships sunk during World War II (August 15 in DC)


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 7

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 7 1782 - Badge of Military Merit (Purple Heart) established 1942 - Navy Amphibious Task Force lands Marines on Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands in first U.S. land offensive of World War II 1964 - Gulf of Tonkin Resolution passed by Congress


USCG Foundation to Honor Fellowmen in Alaska

The Coast Guard Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to the education and   welfare of all Coast Guard members and their families, announced today that it will honor the men   and women who serve in Alaska at its biennial Alaska Awards Dinner at The Hotel Captain Cook in   Anchorage on Wednesday August 13th.  Geraldo Rivera, world-class sailor and Fox News senior correspondent, and Sig Hansen, captain of the   F/V Northwestern and star of the Discovery Channels Deadliest Catch, wil

  The Coast Guard Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to the education and welfare of all Coast Guard members and their families, announced today that it will honor the men and women who serve in Alaska at its biennial Alaska Awards Dinner at The Hotel Captain Cook in Anchorage


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 5

Operation Big Switch Freedom -- Carrying a brand-new navy white hat, Zacheus A. Smith, Jr., hospital corpsman, third class, USN, ... climbs out of an ambulance at Freedom Village, Munsan, Korea, the processing center for returning POWs. (Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the All Hands collection at the Naval Historical Center)

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 5 1832 - Frigate Potomac is first U.S. Navy ship to entertain royalty, King and Queen of Sandwich Islands, Honolulu 1864 - R.Adm. David Farragut wins Battle of Mobile Bay, sealing off last Confederate port on Gulf Coast


Tall Ship Cutter Eagle to Visit Rockland

U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle (USCG photo by Erik Swanson)

The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Eagle is scheduled to arrive in Rockland, Maine, Friday, at 3 p.m. as part of its 2014 cadet summer training deployment. The Eagle's visit to Rockland is to celebrate the Maine Lobster Festival. The Eagle will be open for free public tours Saturday, Aug. 2, from 1 p


RIMPAC Draws ADF Closer to Amphibious Future

HMAS Success maintains her assigned station on the Guide during the Fleet Formation serial, in which 38 warships and four submarines sailed in close company, testing the seamanship skills of bridge watchkeeping staff. The serial took 11 hours and resulted in an arial photograph of all the participating RIMPAC 14 ships and submarines.

More than 800 Australian Navy, Army and Air Force personnel are on their way home after taking part in RIMPAC, the world’s largest naval exercise, which concluded in Hawaii today. Australia sent the Royal Australian Navy (RAN) ship HMAS Success and Submarine HMAS Sheean


Admiral on U.S. Navy & Asia Pacific Re-balancing Act

Adm. Samuel J. Locklear III: Photo USN

The commander of U.S. Pacific Command has briefed Pentagon reporters, discussing the U.S. rebalance to the Asia-Pacific region, successful engagement with partners there and conditions for continued stability and security, according to DoD News, Defense Media Activity, as excerpted here.


Hellfire Missile Firing a First for New Navy Helicopters

Helicopters successfully fired its Hellfire Missile

  The Royal Australian Navy’s newest maritime combat helicopter, the MH-60R Seahawk ‘Romeo’, has successfully fired its first ‘Hellfire’ missile in the United States. The AGM-114 Hellfire air-to-surface missile was fired by Navy’s 725 Squadron from


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 30

USS Indianapolis (CA-35) preparing to leave Tinian after delivering atomic bomb components, circa July 26, 1945. She was sunk on July 30 while en route to the Philippines. (Donation of Major Harley G. Toomey, Jr., USAF(Retired), 1971, who took this photograph. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 30 1918 - Units of First Marine Aviation Force arrive at Brest, France 1941 - Japanese aircraft bomb USS Tutuila (PR-4) at Chungking, China; First Navy ship damaged by Axis during World War II. 1942 - Franklin D


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 25

USS Harmon (DE-72). U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives and Records Administration

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 25 1779 - Amphibious expedition against British in Penobscot Bay, Maine 1863 - U.S. Squadron bombards Fort Wagner, N.C. 1866 - Rank of Admiral created. David G. Farragut is appointed the first Admiral in the U.S. Navy






 
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