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This Day in Naval History - June 28

1794 - Joshua Humphreys appointed master builder to build Navy ships at an annual salary of $2,000. 1814 - USS Wasp captures HMS Reindeer. 1865 - CSS Shenandoah captures 11 American whalers in one day. 1970 - USS James Madison (SSBN 627) completes conversion to Poseidon missile capability.


Moody's Ups Newport News

Moody's Investors Service upgraded the senior unsecured debt rating of Newport News Shipbuilding Inc. (NNS) to Ba1 from Ba2 to reflect the company's improving operating and cash flow performance, and its strengthening business outlook and balance sheet. The ratings also incorporate its still-weak balance sheet, notwithstanding the recent gradual improvements. Moody's also said that it maintained its Ba1 ratings on the company's bank facilities


Netherlands Navy Chooses Thordon

Royal-Netherlands-Navy-patr.jpg

Caption: Composite image of patrol vessel for Royal Netherlands navy to be equipped with Thordon seawater lubricated COMPAC propeller shaft bearings. Schelde Naval Shipbuilding in Vlissingen, Netherlands will fit Thordon seawater lubricated Compac propeller shaft bearings to four Patrol Vessels that will be built for the Royal Netherlands Navy. With a 30 year history of supplying seawater lubricated bearings to many of the world’s navies


This Day in Naval History - March 02

From the Navy News Service:   1859 - The first Navy ship built on the West Coast of the United States, Saginaw, is launched at Mare Island, Calif. 1867 - The Navy Civil Engineering Corps is established. 1899 - An act of Congress creates the rank "Admiral of the Navy" for George Dewey. 1973 - Women begin pilot training in the Navy.   For more information about naval history, visit the Naval Historical Center Web site at www.history.navy.mil


NASNI Builds Navy's First Submarine Firefighting Trainer

Nick Lugue Jr., a welder with Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southwest, welds a new firefighting trainer into place at Naval Air Station North Island. The trainer is the first of four new trainers the Navy is building that will simulate potential fire hazards aboard submarines. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Todd C. Behrman)

Smoke bellows out the ventilation ducts. The glow of the blazing fire emanates down the passageway. Firefighters move with precision and purpose, pausing to unleash a torrent of water towards the fire as they kneel before it. Such was the scene at the Navy's first submarine firefighting trainer, located at Naval Air Station North Island (NASNI) Oct. 29. Commander, Navy Installation Command (CNIC) approached Kidde Fire Trainers almost one year ago in response to the incident on the USS Miami


Navantia Banks on the Future

Navantia has counted on navy business to sustain itself in recent years, building ships such as this LHD.

It is no secret that the Spanish shipbuilding sector has hit on hard times, particularly in the big ship sector where much of the commercial business has evolved to lower cost manufacturers in the Far East. But considering that Navantia has a 300-year history, the current downturn is put in perspective. While Navantia is not without challenges, it has the aforementioned experience and a military backlog to lean on. Navantia is engaged in the design and manufacture of Integrated Platform


A More Powerful Chinese Navy?

According to a report in the Taipei Times, Chinese President Hu Jintao urged the building of a powerful navy that is prepared "at any time" for military struggle, state media reported yesterday. At a meeting of delegates to a Chinese Communist Party navy forum on Wednesday, Hu reportedly said China was a major maritime country whose naval capability must be improved. "We should strive to build a powerful navy that adapts to the needs of our military's historical mission in this new


This Day in Naval History - June 17

From the Navy News Service 1833 - USS Delaware enters drydock at Gosport Navy Yard in , , the first warship to enter a public drydock in the . 1870 - USS Mohican burns Mexican pirate ship Forward. 1898 - Corps established. 1940 - Chief of Naval Operations asks Congress for money to build two-ocean Navy.


RAN Diver Training Complex Officially Opens

After two years of construction, the upgraded Royal Australian Navy (RAN) Diving School and the Submarine and Underwater Medicine Unit (SUMU) have been officially opened at a ceremony at HMAS Penguin. Deputy Chief of Navy Rear Admiral Michael van Balen, was joined by current and former members of the Navy diving community at the ribbon cutting.   The buildings are part of a $63.3 million redevelopment which has modernised facilities at HMAS Penguin and the Pittwater Annexe in


Mexican Navy Contracts Damen for Two Vessels

Rendering of the FCS 5009 (Image courtesy of Damen)

Secretaria de Marina orders seventh patrol vessel and a fast crew supplier In August 2014 the Mexican Navy (Secretaría de Marina) and the Netherlands’ Damen Shipyards Group signed contracts for the delivery of the design, material package, technical assistance and training for two vessels that will be built by the Mexican Navy, using the Damen Technical Cooperation program, which enables customers to build their vessel on the location of their choice.


Waterjets Manufacturing Comes Stateside

Thrustmaster founder, president and CEO Joe Bekker (middle) seals the deal to bring waterjet manufacture to Texas.

Thrustmaster’s deal with DOEN brings waterjet manufacturing to the United States.   Marine propulsion and thruster manufacturer Thrustmaster of Texas, Inc. announced a deal earlier this year to acquire the technology of DOEN, an Australian designer and manufacturer of waterjet


EDGE Facility to Develop, Deliver Security Capabilities

Center in Nova Scotia will focus on rapidly delivering new technologies and capabilities to the Royal Canadian Navy as they transition to future fleet.    General Dynamics Canada announced the opening of the 17th EDGE facility in the EDGE Innovation Network


HII Appoints Brenton as Corporate Director

Kevin Brenton is HII’s corporate director of customer affairs for submarine programs. Photo by Chris Oxley/HII

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that Capt. Kevin Brenton (U.S. Navy, Ret.) has joined the company as corporate director of customer affairs for submarine programs. Brenton served most recently as deputy director of the Navy's Strategic Systems Programs


Ingalls Shipbuilding Begins Fabrication for Aegis Destroyer

Huntington Ingalls Industries' (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division today marked the start of fabrication for the future Aegis-guided missile destroyer Paul Ignatius (DDG 117). Paul Ignatius, the ship's namesake, and his wife, Nancy Ignatius, the ship's sponsor


Navy, Other Agencies, Award Bio-refinery Contracts to 3 Firms

Biofuel RAS: Photo USN

As part of a 2011 Presidential directive, the Departments of Navy, Energy, and Agriculture have announced that three companies have been awarded contracts to construct and commission biorefineries capable of producing "drop-in" biofuels to meet the transportation needs of the military


China's Navy Enters Strait of Hormuz

Bandar Abbas, home of Iran's navy and the main port in the strategically important Strait of Hormuz, is currently hosting two Chinese naval vessels on a five-day goodwill visit, underlining the increasingly warm relationship between the two countries.


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 23

USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 23 1779 - Capt. John Paul Jones in Continental Navy frigate Bonhomme Richard captures HMS Serapis. 1931 - Lt. Alfred Pride pilots Navy's first rotary wing aircraft, XOP-1 autogiro, in landings and takeoffs on board USS Langley while underway.


Ingalls Authenticates Keel on Aegis Destroyer

With Ingalls Shipbuilding President Brian Cuccias (right) observing, shipfitter Bob Boegner (left) and Ship Sponsor Georgeann McRaven delcare the keel of Ralph Johnson (DDG 114) to be “truly and fairly laid.” Photo by Lance Davis/HII

Huntington Ingalls Industries' (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division today authenticated the keel for the company's 30th Aegis guided missile destroyer, Ralph Johnson (DDG 114). To make it official, Georgeann McRaven, ship sponsor and wife of retired Adm. William McRaven, former commander, U.S


Maersk Line, Tote Services, Awarded MSC Contract Modifications

MV SSG Edward A. Carter Jr: Photo US Army

The Department of Defense inform that Maersk Line and Tote Services have each been awarded contract modifications as follows: 1. Maersk Line Ltd., Norfolk, Virginia, is being awarded a $12,495,775 modification under a previously awarded firm-fixed-price contract (N00033-10-C-3220) to exercise a


Royal Navy of Oman Takes Delivery of Damen Clipper

Photo: Damen

Proud ceremony follows sophisticated Sail Training Vessel’s successful sea trials On September 12, the Royal Navy of Oman formally accepted ownership of its new sail training vessel at a ceremony at Damen Schelde Naval Shipbuilding in Vlissingen, the Netherlands


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 24

USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) is launched September 24, 1960 at Newport News Shipbuilding. (Photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 24 1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 25

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 25 1941 - In first successful U.S. Navy escort of convoys during World War II, Navy escort turn over HX-150 to British escorts at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point. All ships reach port safely. 1957 - In project Stratoscope


Successful MTG Light Off for USS Zumwalt

Photo courtesy of Rolls-Royce

The future USS Zumwalt, the first ship of the DDG 1000 multimission destroyer class, performed a successful Generator Light-Off of its first Main Turbine Generator Set (MTG) this week, Rolls-Royce announced. The ship is now power self-sufficient enabling follow-on systems testing and trials.


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26

USS Ranger (CV-4). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26 1781 - French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1910 - First recorded reference to provision for aviation in Navy Department organization 1918 - USCGC Tampa lost with 118 men, probably by German submarine


Shock Test Machine Saves Navy Big Bucks

Welding work: Image courtesy of NSWCCD

The Navy's new Deck Simulator Shock Machine (DSSM) improves shipboard electronics reliability while reducing testing costs as equipment evaluations began in Philadelphia, saving the Navy $75,000 per test, as it meassures the effects of simulated underwater explosions on electronic equipment






 
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