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Feared Dead

Bangladesh Rescuers Struggle in Ferry Response; 120 Missing

Bangladeshi rescuers struggled against a strong current and choppy river waters on Tuesday in the search for a ferry that capsized with more than 200 passengers on board with about 120 of them missing, many feared dead. Low-lying Bangladesh, with extensive inland waterways and slack safety standards, has an appalling record of ferry accidents, with casualties sometimes running into the hundreds. Overcrowding is a common feature of many of the accidents, and each time the government vows to toughen regulations. The ferry that sank on Monday, the MV Pinak-6, had a capacity to carry 85 passengers, according to the inland transport authority. It went over and sank in the Padma river about 30 km (18 miles) southwest of the capital, Dhaka. "The navy rescue team started using sonar from this morning," said Mohammad Saiful Hasan Badal, deputy commissioner of the Munshiganj district, where the ferry went down. But a strong current, deep, rough water and poor visibility were complicating the search, Saiful said. Teams from the military, coastguard, Inland Water Transport Authority and the fire brigade had been pressed into the rescue effort, Saiful said. About 100 passengers were rescued after the vessel sank, while two women taken to hospital had died. There was a possibility some of those on board had swum to the riverbank, Saiful told Reuters.


Captain of Korean Ferry Praised Safety in Promotional Video

South Korean Ferry

  The captain of a ferry that sank off South Korea's southwestern tip with hundreds feared dead said in a promotional video four years ago that the journey was safe - as long as passengers followed the instructions of the crew. The irony is the crew ordered the passengers, mostly high school children, to stay put in their cabins as the ferry sank last Wednesday. As is customary in hierarchical Korean society, the orders were not questioned.


Illegal Ferry Ops Again Equals Disaster

At least 56 people, many of them children, drowned and scores are feared missing after an overcrowded boat capsized off Jolo island in the southern Philippines, officials said last Thursday. About 70 survived, many rescued by fishermen, while one man swam two miles to shore after the ML Annahada capsized on Wednesday night, the coastguard said. Twenty-seven children, aged from three months to nine years, were among the dead.


USCG Reconvenes Formal Investigation

The USCG reconvened its one-person formal investigation to determine the cause of the sinking of F/V Cape Fear and the loss of two of its crewmen. F/V Cape Fear sank Jan. 8, 1999 after radioing a distress call reporting they were taking on water. Three of the five crewmen aboard Cape Fear were rescued by the crew of F/V Misty Dawn. The USCG conducted an extensive search for the two missing crewmen. The body of one crewmember was located on a beach near Gooseberry Neck the next day


Today in U.S. Naval History: November 26

William Lynch (Photo: William Maury Morris)

Today in U.S. Naval History - November 26 1847 - Lt. William Lynch in Supply sails from New York to Haifa for an expedition to the River Jordan and the Dead Sea. His group charted the Jordan River from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea and compiled reports of the flora and fauna of the area. 1940 - Sixth and last group of ships involved in Destroyers-for-Bases Agreement transferred to British at Nova Scotia.


News: Fifth Cape Fear Class Crew Boat

Construction is underway of the fifth in the series of "Cape Fear" class crew boats, with the latest version a custom vessel is being built Chesapeake Yachts at his 54 acre facility in Chesapeake, Va. Eminating from the design house of Industrial Object, David Carambat, president, said, "The Cape Fear crew boat is a speedy craft weighing in at an amazingly efficient 42,000 lbs. With twin Caterpillar 3176's, this lean, rugged machine boasts a speed of 31


Oil Tanker Crewman Lost at Sea

According to a report from Agence France-Presse, an employee of Finnish refining company Neste Oil went missing from an oil tanker during a routine trip in the North Sea and is presumed dead, the company said March 7.   (Source: Agence France-Presse)  


This Day in U.S. Naval History - March 28

history.navy.mil.jpg

1800 - Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to pass Cape of Good Hope 1814 - HMS Phoebe and Cherub capture USS Essex off Valparaiso, Chile. Before capture, Essex had captured 24 British prizes during the War of 1812. 1848 - USS Supply reaches the Bay of Acre, anchoring under Mount Carmel near the village of Haifa, during expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan.   Source: http://www.history.navy


Ship Mishap Disables Phone Lines

Telephone lines in the Egyptian northcoast town of Port Fouad went dead this weekend after a Tunisian ship sliced cables while trying to avoid an oncoming ferry, police said. The ship's anchor cut through phone cables as the crew tried to move it out of the way of the passenger ferry at the harbor of Port Fouad, 170 km (100 miles) northeast of Cairo. - (Reuters)


12 Found Alive after Indonesian Ferry Sinking

The Guardian reported that rescuers found a six-year-old boy and 11 other survivors clinging to an oil rig yesterday, days after an Indonesian ferry sank, leaving more than 400 dead or missing, navy officers said. The survivors, described as weak after spending more than four days in the Java Sea, were picked up by the navy 120 miles from where the ferry sank in a storm, said navy spokesman Lt Col Tony Syaiful. The 12, among them a woman


Maersk to Continue Russian Operations

Denmark's A.P. Moller-Maersk said its four subsidiaries with activities in Russia continue to operate as planned despite the recent sharp drop in oil price and the rouble's collapse. "The Group's business with Russia amounts to some two to three percent of our total revenue


Ferry Capsizing Kills at Least 129 in Congo

At least 129 people are dead in the Democratic Republic of Congo after an overcrowded vessel sank on Lake Tanganyika in the early hours of Friday morning.   According to Laurent Kahozi Sumba, the transport minister for Katanga province


MARAD Considers Deepwater O&G Exports

A U.S. agency is considering how the country could export crude oil and natural gas from deepwater ports as the domestic drilling boom adds pressure for Washington to relax trade restrictions and approve shipments of fuel.   The U.S. Maritime Administration, or MARAD


Northrop Grumman, Carisbrooke Renew Service Contract

Northrop Grumman Corporation has renewed its service agreement with U.K.-based Carisbrooke Shipping Limited.   The contract will cover spares and labor for navigation systems, communication equipment and voyage data recorders onboard the 23 vessels, which include 6,000-, 8,000- and 12


Congressman Introduces Bill Lifting Oil Export Ban

U.S. Representative Joe Barton (Credit: U.S. House Office)

U.S. Representative Joe Barton will introduce a bill on Tuesday to lift the 40-year ban on exports of crude oil, but the measure has almost no chance of passing due to lawmaker concerns about fuel prices and costs to refiners. Barton, a Republican from Texas


USCG Welcomes Cutter Hamilton to Fleet

Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton

Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton, the first national security cutter homeported on the East Coast, entered into active service today at Union Pier Terminal in downtown Charleston.   The commissioning ceremony for the Coast Guard’s largest and newest 418-foot cutter was presided by Vice Adm


Mundra Port Handles Largest Bulk Carrier

Adani & SEZ

  Adani Ports & SEZ Ltd, India’s largest port developer and part of Adani Group, today said its Mundra Port successfully berthed the largest bulk carrier to call at any port on the west coast of India, thereby making history in the Indian maritime sector.


One dead, Dozens Missing as S.Korean Vessel Sinks

One person was killed and the fate of more than 50 others was unknown after a South Korean fishing vessel sank in the Bering Sea off the coast of Russia's far eastern Chukotka region officials said on Monday. "When the fish were being hauled in, the vessel was hit by a wave


Japan Military Wants China "Crisis Management" Pact

Japan's highest-ranking military officer on Friday urged an early start to a "crisis management" mechanism with China amid conflicting claims to a group of tiny East China Sea islands. Relations between China and Japan, the world's second- and third-largest economies


Energy’s Promising Future Threatened

Unrealistic Fears and Overstated Risks obscure the benefits of new seismic data. The United States stands poised on the edge of a bright energy future. After decades of decreasing domestic energy production and increasing reliance on foreign sources of oil and natural gas


Russia Has No Plan to Cut Oil Output

Russian Energy Minister Alexander Novak

  Russia, the world's biggest energy exporter, does not plan to cut oil production to shore up prices, Rossiya 24 television quoted Energy Minister Alexander Novak as saying on Saturday. Russia, which relies on oil and gas exports for about half its federal budget


SCI Declares 1H Financial Results

SCI Tanker

  The Shipping Corporation of India declared its unaudited financial results for the quarter ended 30.09.2014 posting a profit of Rs.18.59 Crores as compared to a loss of Rs.123.53 crores during the quarter ended 30.09.2013. This has resulted in a cumulative profit of Rs.68


OW Bunker Collapse Rattles Singapore Bunker Markets

Major oil companies, trade firms to expand market share; tight credit hits small retailers. The collapse of OW Bunker in the wake of an alleged fraud at its Singapore trading unit will shake up the city state's more than $25 billion marine fuel market, the world's largest


Convicted Crew of Korean Ferry File Appeals

Photo: South Korea Coast Guard

Eight of the 15 surviving crew members of a South Korean ferry that capsized in April have filed for appeal against their convictions on negligence charges in the country's worst maritime disaster in more than four decades. The eight crew members


South Korean Ferry Captain Sentenced to 36 Years

Photo: South Korean Coast Guard

The captain of a South Korean ferry that capsized in April killing 304 passengers was jailed for 36 years on November 11, 2014, after a court found him guilty of negligence, but was acquitted of homicide for which prosecutors had sought the death penalty.  






 
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