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Feared Dead

Captain of Korean Ferry Praised Safety in Promotional Video

South Korean Ferry

  The captain of a ferry that sank off South Korea's southwestern tip with hundreds feared dead said in a promotional video four years ago that the journey was safe - as long as passengers followed the instructions of the crew. The irony is the crew ordered the passengers, mostly high school children, to stay put in their cabins as the ferry sank last Wednesday. As is customary in hierarchical Korean society, the orders were not questioned. However, many of those who escaped alive either did not hear or flouted the instructions and were rescued as they jumped off the deck. Sixty-four people are known to have died and 238 are missing, presumed dead in the upturned hull of the stricken Sewol ferry. Captain Lee Joon-seok, 69, and other crew members have been arrested. Of the 476 passengers and crew on board, 339 were children and teachers on a high school outing. Lee made a promotional video in 2010 in which he highlighted the safety of the journey from the port city of Incheon to the holiday island of Jeju. "Passengers who take our ship to and from Incheon and Jeju can enjoy a safe and pleasant trip and I believe it is safer than any other vehicle as long as they follow the instructions of our crew members," he said in transcripts broadcast by regional cable station OBS. Parents of the children missing in the accident in what is likely to turn out to be one of South Korea's worst maritime disasters sat exhausted from days of grief on Monday


Illegal Ferry Ops Again Equals Disaster

At least 56 people, many of them children, drowned and scores are feared missing after an overcrowded boat capsized off Jolo island in the southern Philippines, officials said last Thursday. About 70 survived, many rescued by fishermen, while one man swam two miles to shore after the ML Annahada capsized on Wednesday night, the coastguard said. Twenty-seven children, aged from three months to nine years, were among the dead.


USCG Reconvenes Formal Investigation

The USCG reconvened its one-person formal investigation to determine the cause of the sinking of F/V Cape Fear and the loss of two of its crewmen. F/V Cape Fear sank Jan. 8, 1999 after radioing a distress call reporting they were taking on water. Three of the five crewmen aboard Cape Fear were rescued by the crew of F/V Misty Dawn. The USCG conducted an extensive search for the two missing crewmen. The body of one crewmember was located on a beach near Gooseberry Neck the next day


News: Fifth Cape Fear Class Crew Boat

Construction is underway of the fifth in the series of "Cape Fear" class crew boats, with the latest version a custom vessel is being built Chesapeake Yachts at his 54 acre facility in Chesapeake, Va. Eminating from the design house of Industrial Object, David Carambat, president, said, "The Cape Fear crew boat is a speedy craft weighing in at an amazingly efficient 42,000 lbs. With twin Caterpillar 3176's, this lean, rugged machine boasts a speed of 31


12 Found Alive after Indonesian Ferry Sinking

The Guardian reported that rescuers found a six-year-old boy and 11 other survivors clinging to an oil rig yesterday, days after an Indonesian ferry sank, leaving more than 400 dead or missing, navy officers said. The survivors, described as weak after spending more than four days in the Java Sea, were picked up by the navy 120 miles from where the ferry sank in a storm, said navy spokesman Lt Col Tony Syaiful. The 12, among them a woman


Today in U.S. Naval History: November 26

William Lynch (Photo: William Maury Morris)

Today in U.S. Naval History - November 26 1847 - Lt. William Lynch in Supply sails from New York to Haifa for an expedition to the River Jordan and the Dead Sea. His group charted the Jordan River from the Sea of Galilee to the Dead Sea and compiled reports of the flora and fauna of the area. 1940 - Sixth and last group of ships involved in Destroyers-for-Bases Agreement transferred to British at Nova Scotia.


Ship Mishap Disables Phone Lines

Telephone lines in the Egyptian northcoast town of Port Fouad went dead this weekend after a Tunisian ship sliced cables while trying to avoid an oncoming ferry, police said. The ship's anchor cut through phone cables as the crew tried to move it out of the way of the passenger ferry at the harbor of Port Fouad, 170 km (100 miles) northeast of Cairo. - (Reuters)


This Day in Naval History - April 18

From the Navy News Service 1848 - A Navy expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan, commanded by Lt. William F. Lynch, reaches the . 1906 - The Navy assists in relief operations during the earthquake and fire. 1942 - USS Hornet (CV 8) launches Doolittle's Army bombers for the first attack on . 1988 - Navy destroys two Iranian drilling platforms and a frigate in retaliation for attack on USS Samuel B. Roberts (FFG 58)


Oil Tanker Crewman Lost at Sea

According to a report from Agence France-Presse, an employee of Finnish refining company Neste Oil went missing from an oil tanker during a routine trip in the North Sea and is presumed dead, the company said March 7.   (Source: Agence France-Presse)  


Today in U.S. Naval History: March 28

USS Essex, Artist: Joseph Howard (Courtesy U.S. Naval Academy Museum Collection)

Today in U.S. Naval History - March 28 1800 - Essex becomes first U.S. Navy vessel to pass Cape of Good Hope 1814 - HMS Phoebe and Cherub capture USS Essex off Valparaiso, Chile. Before capture, Essex had captured 24 British prizes during the War of 1812. 1848 - USS Supply reaches the Bay of Acre, anchoring under Mount Carmel near the village of Haifa, during expedition to explore the Dead Sea and the River Jordan.


Italy Rescues 1,800 Refugees, Five Bodies Recovered

Italy's navy said it rescued nearly 1,800 migrants in overcrowded boats in the Mediterranean over the weekend, and a merchant ship recovered five bodies from a sinking rubber raft off the coast of Libya. Calmer summer seas have led to a surge in people trying to reach Italy from North Africa


Bureau Veritas Kick-starts LNG Bunkering

Jean-Francois Segretain

International classification society Bureau Veritas has published a comprehensive set of guidelines on LNG Bunkering, with the aim of speeding adoption of LNG as a ship’s fuel by kick-starting the LNG bunker chain. Jean-Francois Segretain, Technical Director, Marine and Offshore Division


Korea Ferry Businessman's Body Located

Yoo had been target of South Korea's largest manhunt; Failure of police to catch Yoo had been burden for Park government. The body of South Korea's most wanted man, linked to the sinking of a ferry in April that killed 300 people, was identified more than a month after being found in an orchard


Maine Port City Bans Oil Loading

Photo: The City of South Portland

City councilors in South Portland, Maine, voted late Monday night to ban the loading of crude oil onto tankers along its waterfront, throwing up yet another roadblock to the export of Canadian oil sands crude and setting up a showdown with industry which called the process illegal.


Situation At Achinsk Oil Refinery Post Accident

Achinsk refinery

  On June 15, 2014 there was a serious accident at Achinsk oil refinery. Unfortunately, as a result, people died and some were injured. President and all Company’s staff send their condolences to the victims’ relatives. An Emergency Operations Center headed by Rosneft


Veolia Strategy At Sea Over France-Corsica Ferry Stalemate

  Veolia Environnement, a global leader in water and waste management, has a little local difficulty: an ailing France-Corsica ferry operator that weighs on its shares, gives its CEO nightmares and puts the brakes on its strategic plans.


Perils of Heavy Ship Containers Debated

Chris Evans speaking at the WISTA-UK Forum (Credit WISTA)

Maritime experts are torn on how to curb the menace of overweight shipping containers, which cause severe accidents at sea and on the roads. The difficulties of resolving false declarations of the weight and content of boxes were underlined during a panel discussion at the WISTA-UK Liverpool Forum


S. African Engineers & Metallurgists to Strike from July 1

  More than 220,000 members of the union of engineers and workers of South Africa (NUMSA) will drop their tools on July 1, after the failure of talks to avert a strike, their leaders said Sunday. The secretary general of South Africa's largest union, Irvin Jim


Migrant Death Toll Rises on Sea Route to Italy

Migrants arriving on boats in southern Italy say 81 other people travelling with them have died or gone missing during their sea journeys from north Africa, the UN refugee agency said on Wednesday. A group of 27 migrants picked up on Tuesday by Italy's naval rescue mission and brought to the


Arthur Becomes Atlantic's First Hurricane of 2014

Source: NOAA

Storm Arthur became the first hurricane of the 2014 Atlantic hurricane season, the U.S. National Hurricane Center (NHC) said on Thursday. Arthur was about 190 miles (305 km) south-southwest of Cape Fear, North Carolina with maximum sustained wind of 75 mph (120 kph), NHC said.


Panama Canal Cost Dispute Arbitration to Begin in July

© Canal de Panamá

Arbitration to decide who will bear the Panama Canal expansion project's $1.6 billion cost overrun, a dispute that temporarily halted work earlier this year, will begin in closed-door sessions in Miami later this month, according to lawyers arguing the matter.


Valls Urges End to Strike at "Sinking" Ferry Group SNCM

Workers at France-Corsica ferry operator SNCM must end their strike and let the troubled company undergo a restructuring to secure its future, Prime Minister Manuel Valls said on Tuesday. Loss-making SNCM, whose unions have been on strike since June 24


More than 1,700 Boat Migrants Rescued in 3 Days

Italy’s Operation Mare Nostrum rescued record numbers of migrants from the Mediterranean Sea between North Africa and Italy (Italian Navy photo)

Italy's search and rescue mission saved more than 1,700 migrants in the Mediterranean in the past three days and found one person dead on a half-submerged raft, the navy said on Tuesday. This year's calmer summer weather has seen record numbers of people attempt to cross the sea from North


Nigeria Cocoa Shipment Resumes

Exporters have resumed loading of cocoa shipments in Nigeria's second-largest producing area, Cross Rivers state, after the state government suspended on Friday a levy on bean exports, a trade body said. Cocoa shipments from Cross Rivers, which produces annual volumes of around 60


Iran, Six Powers Agree to Extend Nuclear Talks - Envoys

  Iran and six world powers on Friday agreed to a four-month extension of negotiations on a long-term nuclear deal that would gradually end sanctions on Tehran  in exchange for curbs on its nuclear programme, diplomats close to the talks said.






 
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