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This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – October 28

1919-Congress passed the National Prohibition Enforcement Act, otherwise known as the Volstead Act, on this date.  The Volstead Act authorized the enforcement of the 18th Amendment, ratified on 29 January 1919.  The Act authorized the Coast Guard to prevent the maritime importation of illegal alcohol.  This led to the largest increase in the size and responsibilities of the service to that date. 1943-Choiseul, Treasury Islands landing (Coast Guard-manned LST-71 was in second echelon November 1, 1943). 1991-Thousands of Haitian migrants began fleeing their homeland after the overthrow of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, prompting one of the largest SAR operations in Coast Guard history.  Cutters and aircraft from as far north as New England converged on the Windward Passage.  In the first 30 days of the operation, Coast Guard forces rescued more than 6,300 men, women, and children who left Haiti in grossly overloaded and unseaworthy vessels.  75 Coast Guard units ultimately took part in the massive SAR operation and by the end of the year over 40,000 Haitian migrants were rescued. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)  


Michelle Obama Christens ShipConstructor-Designed Vessel

Image courtesy ShipConstructor

On Friday, July 23, First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama christened the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, a vessel that was detail designed and production engineered by Northrop Grumman using ShipConstructor CAD/CAM software. Stratton is the first Coast Guard patrol cutter to be named after a woman in more than 20 years. The ship is named in honor of Dorothy Constance Stratton, the first female commissioned officer in Coast Guard history


News: Deepwater Program Kicks Off Down South

An important milestone, and one of the first building projects in the $17 billion transformation of the U.S. Coast Guard, took place earlier this month at Bollinger Shipyards, Inc., Lockport, La., with the decommissioning of the 110-ft. Island Class Patrol Boat, USCG Matagorda. While seemingly contradictory, the vessel's decommissioning is only temporary as during the next nine months, it will undergo extensive modifications and re-emerge as a larger 123-ft


This Day in Coast Guard History - Jan. 15

1836- A General Order from the Secretary of the Treasury prescribed that "Blue cloth be substituted for the uniform dress of the officers of the Revenue Cutter Service, instead of grey. . ." thereby ending a controversy that ad brewed for years regarding the uniforms of the Service. 1947- The first helicopter flight to the base "Little America" in Antarctica took place.  The pilot was LT James A


This Day in Coast Guard History – August 25

1945-CGC Magnolia was rammed amidships on 25 August 1945 by the cargo ship SS Marguerite Lehand off Mobile Bay.  She sank in two minutes and one of her crew was killed.  The other 49 were rescued.  Those survivors cross-decked to the new tender CGC Salvia (WAGL-400) which then took Magnolia's place. 1950-SS Benevolence collided with SS Mary Luckenbach.  CGC Gresham and other vessels responded and rescued 407 persons.


Today in U.S. Naval History: April 1

USS Bush (DD 529), USS Colhoun (DD 801) and other vessels sank after Japanese kamikazes attacked them off the coast of Okinawa. Both the Bush and Colhoun shot down several Japanese planes during the attack. (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - April 1 1893 - Navy General Order 409 of February 25, 1893 establishes the rate of Chief Petty Officer as of this date. 1917 - Boatswain's Mate 1/c John I. Eopolucci, a Naval Armed Guard on board the steamship Aztec, died when the vessel was sunk by a German U-boat. He was the first U.S. Navy sailor killed in action in World War I. 1942 - First Naval Air Transportation Service (NATS) squadron for Pacific operations commissioned


Statement on Piracy by CG Commandant

Statement on Piracy by CG Commandant, Adm. Thad Allen: Piracy has been rightfully called an insult to civilization.  The recent pirate attacks on the motor vessels Maersk Alabama and Liberty Sun focused the attention of the American public on what has been an increasingly significant international issue.  It is important that the American public and the international community know that the U.S. Government is working hard to find an enduring international solution to this


"Coast Guard Goes to the Movies"

USCG photo

The United States Coast Guard Museum in New London, Conn. is currently hosting an exhibit of vintage movie posters pertaining to the Coast Guard in films from the 1920s-1980s. The title of the exhibit is "Coast Guard goes to the Movies: The CDR Ralph W. Judd Collection." The show will run from Nov. 8, 2013 to May 26, 2014. A graduate of the U.S. Coast Guard Academy Class of 1954, Ralph W. Judd served on Coast Guard Cutter Northwind


Today in U.S. Naval History: December 2

USS Enterprise (CVN-65). U.S. Navy photo by Photographers Mate Airman Rob Gaston

Today in U.S. Naval History - December 2 1775 - Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 - Rear Admiral William S. Cowles submits report, prepared by Lt. George C. Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation mission to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 - First Naval Armed Guard detachment (seven men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne,


Senators Ask USCG to Publish Cruise Inspection Information

Photo: Greg Trauthwein

U.S. Sens. Blumenthal, Rockefeller, Markey call on Coast Guard to make cruise ship inspection information available to public; Senators also call on Coast Guard to detail how inspection information will be used to hold cruise ships with safety problems accountable In a letter to U.S. Coast Guard Admiral Robert Papp, Jr., U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV (D-W.V.), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and Edward J


Video: New Channel Established on Atchafalaya River

USCG photo

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) helped establish Crewboat Cut as a new federal channel in the Atchafalaya River near Morgan City, Wednesday. The new waterway is intended to be safer for mariners, will shorten travel time and save millions of dollars in annual dredging costs.


USS Constitution Not to Set Sail Until 2018

USS Constitution gets underway in Boston Harbor for the ships 217th birthday cruise.

  The crew of USS Constitution embarked on their final Boston Harbor underway demonstration aboard Old Ironsides this year, Oct. 17. Constitution set out into the harbor for her fifth and final underway of 2014 at 10 a.m. with more than 600 guests in attendance aboard America's 'Ship of


Coast Guard Foundation to Honor USCG in Miami

Admiral Thad Allen, 23rd Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard (Ret.)

The Coast Guard Foundation, a nonprofit organization committed to the education and welfare of all Coast Guard members and their families, announced today that its annual Tribute to the United States Coast Guard Seventh District will take place on November 13 at the Marriott Biscayne Bay in Miami


USCG Monitoring Barge adrift in Beaufort Sea

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  U.S. Coast Guard personnel and Canadian federal agencies, including the Canadian coast guard, Transport Canada and Environment Canada, are monitoring a 134-foot barge drifting in the Beaufort Sea after it broke free from its tow in Canadian waters during a severe storm Monday.


Coast Guard Foundation to Honor Longtime Supporter

James J. Coleman, Jr.

National Tribute Set for Thursday, October 9, 2014 The Coast Guard Foundation, a nonprofit organization committed to the education and welfare of all Coast Guard members and their families, announced today that at its upcoming 34th Annual Salute to the U.S


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 23

USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 23 1779 - Capt. John Paul Jones in Continental Navy frigate Bonhomme Richard captures HMS Serapis. 1931 - Lt. Alfred Pride pilots Navy's first rotary wing aircraft, XOP-1 autogiro, in landings and takeoffs on board USS Langley while underway.


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 24

USS Enterprise (CVAN-65) is launched September 24, 1960 at Newport News Shipbuilding. (Photo courtesy of Huntington Ingalls Industries)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 24 1918 - Ensign David S. Ingalls, USNR, in a Sopwith Camel, shoots down his fifth enemy aircraft, becoming the first U.S. Navy ace while flying with the British Royal Air Force. 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft attack Japanese in Visayas


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 25

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 25 1941 - In first successful U.S. Navy escort of convoys during World War II, Navy escort turn over HX-150 to British escorts at the Mid-Ocean Meeting Point. All ships reach port safely. 1957 - In project Stratoscope


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26

USS Ranger (CV-4). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 26 1781 - French fleet defeats British at Yorktown, Va. 1910 - First recorded reference to provision for aviation in Navy Department organization 1918 - USCGC Tampa lost with 118 men, probably by German submarine


Fire Aboard Alaska Natural Gas Platform

The U.S. Coast Guard launched several assets in response to a report of a fire on board a natural gas drill platform in Cook Inlet Thursday. The Coast Guard diverted a Coast Guard Hercules HC-130 crew and an MH-60 Jayhawk helicopter crew to conduct an overflight of the Baker Platform in Cook


Seaspan Shipyards Completes Repair Work on Historic Tug

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Seaspan’s Vancouver Shipyards announced today it has completed volunteer repair work on the Steam Tow Boat Master (SS Master) as part of its $50,000 donation to the SS Master Society.                             


Britain to Screen Passengers for Ebola

Britain said on Thursday it would start screening passengers entering the country through London's two main airports and the Eurostar rail link with Europe for possible cases of the Ebola virus. "Enhanced screening will initially be implemented at London's Heathrow and Gatwick airports and


Today in U.S. Naval History: October 13

Today in U.S. Naval History - October 13 1775 - Birthday of U.S. Navy. The Continental Congress establishes Continental Navy, later the U.S. Navy. 1954 - USS Saipan begins relief and humanitarian aid to Haitians who were victims of Hurricane Hazel. The operation ended October 19.


USCG, NOAA Ink Fleet Plan Agreement

Coast Guard Vice Adm. Charles Michel, deputy commandant for operations, and NOAA Vice Adm. Michael Devany, deputy under secretary for operations, sign the Fleet Plan Agreement letter of promulgation at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters, Washington, D.C Oct. 8, 2014 (Photo: NOAA)

Senior leaders from the U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) signed a Fleet Plan and Officer Exchange memorandum of understanding Wednesday at a ceremony at U.S. Coast Guard Headquarters.


Today in U.S. Naval History: October 14

Today in U.S. Naval History - October 14 1918 - Naval Aviators of Marine Day Squadron 9 make first raid-in-force for the Northern Bombing Group in World War I when they bombed German railroad at Thielt Rivy, Belgium. For more information about naval history






 
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