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This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – October 28

1919-Congress passed the National Prohibition Enforcement Act, otherwise known as the Volstead Act, on this date.  The Volstead Act authorized the enforcement of the 18th Amendment, ratified on 29 January 1919.  The Act authorized the Coast Guard to prevent the maritime importation of illegal alcohol.  This led to the largest increase in the size and responsibilities of the service to that date. 1943-Choiseul, Treasury Islands landing (Coast Guard-manned LST-71 was in second echelon November 1, 1943). 1991-Thousands of Haitian migrants began fleeing their homeland after the overthrow of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, prompting one of the largest SAR operations in Coast Guard history.  Cutters and aircraft from as far north as New England converged on the Windward Passage.  In the first 30 days of the operation, Coast Guard forces rescued more than 6,300 men, women, and children who left Haiti in grossly overloaded and unseaworthy vessels.  75 Coast Guard units ultimately took part in the massive SAR operation and by the end of the year over 40,000 Haitian migrants were rescued. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)  


Michelle Obama Christens ShipConstructor-Designed Vessel

Image courtesy ShipConstructor

On Friday, July 23, First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama christened the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, a vessel that was detail designed and production engineered by Northrop Grumman using ShipConstructor CAD/CAM software. Stratton is the first Coast Guard patrol cutter to be named after a woman in more than 20 years. The ship is named in honor of Dorothy Constance Stratton, the first female commissioned officer in Coast Guard history


This Day in Coast Guard History – August 25

1945-CGC Magnolia was rammed amidships on 25 August 1945 by the cargo ship SS Marguerite Lehand off Mobile Bay.  She sank in two minutes and one of her crew was killed.  The other 49 were rescued.  Those survivors cross-decked to the new tender CGC Salvia (WAGL-400) which then took Magnolia's place. 1950-SS Benevolence collided with SS Mary Luckenbach.  CGC Gresham and other vessels responded and rescued 407 persons.


This Day in Coast Guard History - Jan. 15

1836- A General Order from the Secretary of the Treasury prescribed that "Blue cloth be substituted for the uniform dress of the officers of the Revenue Cutter Service, instead of grey. . ." thereby ending a controversy that ad brewed for years regarding the uniforms of the Service. 1947- The first helicopter flight to the base "Little America" in Antarctica took place.  The pilot was LT James A


News: Deepwater Program Kicks Off Down South

An important milestone, and one of the first building projects in the $17 billion transformation of the U.S. Coast Guard, took place earlier this month at Bollinger Shipyards, Inc., Lockport, La., with the decommissioning of the 110-ft. Island Class Patrol Boat, USCG Matagorda. While seemingly contradictory, the vessel's decommissioning is only temporary as during the next nine months, it will undergo extensive modifications and re-emerge as a larger 123-ft


Today in U.S. Naval History: December 2

USS Enterprise (CVN-65). U.S. Navy photo by Photographers Mate Airman Rob Gaston

Today in U.S. Naval History - December 2 1775 - Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 - Rear Admiral William S. Cowles submits report, prepared by Lt. George C. Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation mission to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 - First Naval Armed Guard detachment (seven men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne,


Today in U.S. Naval History: April 1

USS Bush (DD 529), USS Colhoun (DD 801) and other vessels sank after Japanese kamikazes attacked them off the coast of Okinawa. Both the Bush and Colhoun shot down several Japanese planes during the attack. (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - April 1 1893 - Navy General Order 409 of February 25, 1893 establishes the rate of Chief Petty Officer as of this date. 1917 - Boatswain's Mate 1/c John I. Eopolucci, a Naval Armed Guard on board the steamship Aztec, died when the vessel was sunk by a German U-boat. He was the first U.S. Navy sailor killed in action in World War I. 1942 - First Naval Air Transportation Service (NATS) squadron for Pacific operations commissioned


Senators Ask USCG to Publish Cruise Inspection Information

Photo: Greg Trauthwein

U.S. Sens. Blumenthal, Rockefeller, Markey call on Coast Guard to make cruise ship inspection information available to public; Senators also call on Coast Guard to detail how inspection information will be used to hold cruise ships with safety problems accountable In a letter to U.S. Coast Guard Admiral Robert Papp, Jr., U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV (D-W.V.), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and Edward J


This Day in Coast Guard History – Sept. 29

1898-The American steamer, Toledo with the barge Shawnee in tow, became water-logged 25 miles southwest of the station at Ship Canal, MI. Her crew boarded Shawnee and sailed to the canal. There they engaged the steamer D. F. Rose to tow Toledo in and the surfmen assisted to lay her on the beach near the piers. The keeper then telephoned for a tug and lighter, and upon their arrival all hands set to work until 11 p.m. saving about 1,000 feet of lumber


This Day in Coast Guard History – Jan. 21

1944- Coast Guardsmen participated in the landings at Anzio-Nettuno, Italy. 1987- The Coast Guard established the Air Interdiction Facility at Norfolk Naval Air Station.  The aircrews flew two loaned Navy E-2C Hawkeye aircraft on narcotics interdiction patrols. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)


USCG in Search of Missing Man in Lake Michigan

The Wild Irish, a 26-foot sailboat. Kiehm is reported to be on the boat in Lake Michigan.

  The Coast Guard is searching for a man who went missing on Lake Michigan, Tuesday. Missing is 48-year-old Joseph Kiehm from Milwaukee. Kiehm was last seen aboard his 26-foot white sailboat, the Wild Irish, at McKinley Marina in the Milwaukee Harbor between 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., Tuesday


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 17

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 17 1861 - Union landing party from USS Massachusetts takes possession of Ship Island, Mississippi. This was the headquarters for Adm. David Farragut's Gulf Coast Blockading Squadron. 1944 - Navy Task Force lands Army troops on Angaur


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 16

USS Grayback (USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst)

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 16 1854 - Cdr. David G. Farragut takes possession of Mare Island, the first U.S. Navy Yard on the Pacific. 1917 - Navy Department authorizes establishment of 16 Naval air stations abroad 1922 - Cdr


Fourth National Security Cutter Delivered to USCG

Coast Guard Cutter Hamilton will be the first National Security Cutter to be based on the East Coast and will be joined by Coast Guard Cutter James, currently in production, next year at their new homeport in Charleston, So

  The Coast Guard accepted delivery of the fourth National Security Cutter, Hamilton, in Pascagoula, Mississippi, Monday. Hamilton will be the first of two NSCs to be homeported in Charleston, South Carolina.  The cutter will be commissioned into service Dec. 6.


USCG Confirm Jelly Fish Concentration in Buzzard's Bay, Massachusetts

Jellyfish

  Coast Guard pollution responders, and the Fairhaven Harbormaster responded to a report of a large oil sheen in Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts Friday morning. At 2:00 p.m. Coast Guard Sector Southeastern New England was notified by a local


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 12

Today in U.S. Naval History: September 12 1916 - First demonstration of automatic stabilization and direction gear in aircraft 1944 - 5th Fleet carrier aircraft begin three-day attack on Japanese shipping and facilities in Visayas, Philippines


USCG Repatriates Cuban Boat Migrants

The Cutter Dauntless smallboat crew inspects a rustic vessel used by 20 Cuban migrants south of Dry Tortugas, Florida, Sep. 6, 2014. The migrants were later repatriated by the crew aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Knight Island. U.S. Coast Guard photo.

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) Cutter Knight Island repatriated 45 Cuban migrants to Bahia de Cabañas, Cuba, Wednesday. These repatriations are a result of two separate interdictions of people attempting to illegally migrate to the United States through the Florida Straits.


Video: Vessel Operators Remember 9/11 Heroism

Screenshot from Boatlift

On the 13th anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11, America’s tugboat, towboat and barge industry pauses to remember the nearly 3,000 Americans who lost their lives, and also to acknowledge the inspiring bravery shown by first responders and everyday citizens on that tragic day


New USCG Rule for Lifesaving Devices

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) published a final rule aligning its regulations with the 2010 Coast Guard Authorization Act. Before 2010, certain uninspected commercial vessels including barges and sailing vessels fell outside the scope of the statute requiring the Coast Guard to regulate lifesaving


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 10

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 10 1813 - In Battle of Lake Erie, Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry, flying his "Don't give up the ship" flag, defeats British squadron and says: "We have met the enemy and they are ours..."


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 9

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 9 1825 - USS Brandywine sails for France to carry the Marquis de Lafayette home after his year long visit to America. 1841 - First iron ship authorized by Congress 1940 - Navy awards contracts for 210 ships


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 8

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 8 1923 - In disaster at Point Honda, California, seven destroyers run aground through faulty navigation 1939 - President Franklin D. Roosevelt proclaims limited national emergency and increases enlisted strength in the Navy and Marine Corps; also


USCG Suspends Search for Downed Aircraft near Jamaica

USCG emblem

  The Coast Guard suspended their search Sunday at approximately 11 a.m. for two possible survivors of a plane in the water 14 miles north of Port Antonio, Jamaica, Friday. Watchstanders at Coast Guard 7th District command center in Miami received a call from U.S. Northern Command at 11 a


USCG, Good Samaritan Rescue Boater on S. Lake Michigan

Image

  The Coast Guard and a good Samaritan found and rescued a man Saturday morning, who had been missing since Friday afternoon on lower Lake Michigan. The Coast Guard is not releasing the man’s name and there is no imagery of video available.


Today in U.S. Naval History: September 5

Today in U.S. Naval History - September 5 1776 - Adoption of first uniforms for Navy officers 1813- USS Enterprise captures HM brig Boxer off Portland, Maine 1918 - USS Mount Vernon torpedoed by German submarine off France 1923 - U.S






 
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