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This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – October 28

1919-Congress passed the National Prohibition Enforcement Act, otherwise known as the Volstead Act, on this date.  The Volstead Act authorized the enforcement of the 18th Amendment, ratified on 29 January 1919.  The Act authorized the Coast Guard to prevent the maritime importation of illegal alcohol.  This led to the largest increase in the size and responsibilities of the service to that date. 1943-Choiseul, Treasury Islands landing (Coast Guard-manned LST-71 was in second echelon November 1, 1943). 1991-Thousands of Haitian migrants began fleeing their homeland after the overthrow of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, prompting one of the largest SAR operations in Coast Guard history.  Cutters and aircraft from as far north as New England converged on the Windward Passage.  In the first 30 days of the operation, Coast Guard forces rescued more than 6,300 men, women, and children who left Haiti in grossly overloaded and unseaworthy vessels.  75 Coast Guard units ultimately took part in the massive SAR operation and by the end of the year over 40,000 Haitian migrants were rescued. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)  


Michelle Obama Christens ShipConstructor-Designed Vessel

Image courtesy ShipConstructor

On Friday, July 23, First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama christened the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, a vessel that was detail designed and production engineered by Northrop Grumman using ShipConstructor CAD/CAM software. Stratton is the first Coast Guard patrol cutter to be named after a woman in more than 20 years. The ship is named in honor of Dorothy Constance Stratton, the first female commissioned officer in Coast Guard history


News: Deepwater Program Kicks Off Down South

An important milestone, and one of the first building projects in the $17 billion transformation of the U.S. Coast Guard, took place earlier this month at Bollinger Shipyards, Inc., Lockport, La., with the decommissioning of the 110-ft. Island Class Patrol Boat, USCG Matagorda. While seemingly contradictory, the vessel's decommissioning is only temporary as during the next nine months, it will undergo extensive modifications and re-emerge as a larger 123-ft


This Day in Coast Guard History - Jan. 15

1836- A General Order from the Secretary of the Treasury prescribed that "Blue cloth be substituted for the uniform dress of the officers of the Revenue Cutter Service, instead of grey. . ." thereby ending a controversy that ad brewed for years regarding the uniforms of the Service. 1947- The first helicopter flight to the base "Little America" in Antarctica took place.  The pilot was LT James A


This Day in Coast Guard History – August 25

1945-CGC Magnolia was rammed amidships on 25 August 1945 by the cargo ship SS Marguerite Lehand off Mobile Bay.  She sank in two minutes and one of her crew was killed.  The other 49 were rescued.  Those survivors cross-decked to the new tender CGC Salvia (WAGL-400) which then took Magnolia's place. 1950-SS Benevolence collided with SS Mary Luckenbach.  CGC Gresham and other vessels responded and rescued 407 persons.


Today in U.S. Naval History: April 1

USS Bush (DD 529), USS Colhoun (DD 801) and other vessels sank after Japanese kamikazes attacked them off the coast of Okinawa. Both the Bush and Colhoun shot down several Japanese planes during the attack. (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - April 1 1893 - Navy General Order 409 of February 25, 1893 establishes the rate of Chief Petty Officer as of this date. 1917 - Boatswain's Mate 1/c John I. Eopolucci, a Naval Armed Guard on board the steamship Aztec, died when the vessel was sunk by a German U-boat. He was the first U.S. Navy sailor killed in action in World War I. 1942 - First Naval Air Transportation Service (NATS) squadron for Pacific operations commissioned


This Day in Coast Guard History – June 23

1716-Province of Massachusetts authorized the erection of the first lighthouse in America.  It was built on Great Brewster Island in Boston Harbor. 1817-The cutter Active forced a South American privateer posing as an armed merchantman to leave the Chesapeake Bay and American waters. 1939-Congress created the Coast Guard Reserve which later became what is today the Coast Guard Auxiliary. (Source: USCG Historian’s


This Day in Coast Guard History – July 12

1953- Coast Guard aircraft and surface craft of the Search and Rescue Group at Wake Island joined with a large naval task unit in conducting an intensive search for a Transocean Air Lines DC-6 aircraft last reported about 300 miles east of Wake Island.  The scene of the crash was located, and 14 bodies were recovered. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)  


This Day in Coast Guard History – July 14

1926- The first radio-beacon established in Alaska, at Cape Spencer, was placed in commission. 1949-U.S. Coast Guardsmen from Point Allerton and Boston Lifeboat Stations figured prominently in one of the largest rescue operations in the history of Boston Harbor Massachusetts when they helped in removing 690 persons from the excursion steamer Nantasket, which had gone aground in a thick fog off Peddock’s Island.


Today in U.S. Naval History: December 2

USS Enterprise (CVN-65). U.S. Navy photo by Photographers Mate Airman Rob Gaston

Today in U.S. Naval History - December 2 1775 - Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 - Rear Admiral William S. Cowles submits report, prepared by Lt. George C. Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation mission to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 - First Naval Armed Guard detachment (seven men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne,


USCG Leadership Development Center Change of Command

U.S. Coast Guard Academy

  The Coast Guard’s Leadership Develop Center will have its first change of command ceremony Thursday, July 31 at 11 a.m. in front of Yeaton Hall at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn. The change of command ceremony provides a time-honored ritual that has


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 25

USS Harmon (DE-72). U.S. Navy Photograph, National Archives and Records Administration

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 25 1779 - Amphibious expedition against British in Penobscot Bay, Maine 1863 - U.S. Squadron bombards Fort Wagner, N.C. 1866 - Rank of Admiral created. David G. Farragut is appointed the first Admiral in the U.S. Navy


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 28

USS Callaghan (DD-792)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 28 1915 - Sailors and Marines land in Haiti to restore order 1916 - Navy establishes a Code and Signal Section which initially worked against German ciphers and tested the security of communications during U.S. naval training maneuvers.


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 29

Crew members fight a series of fires and explosions on the carrier USS Forrestals after flight deck, in the Gulf of Tonkin, 29 July 1967. The conflagration took place as heavily-armed and fueled aircraft were being prepared for combat missions over North Vietnam. (Official U.S. Navy Photograph.)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 29 1846 - Sailors and Marines from U.S. sloop Cyane capture San Diego, Calif. 1918 - Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt visits Queenstown, Ireland 1945 - U.S. warships bombard Hamamatsu, Japan.


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 15

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 15 1870 - Act of Congress establishes Pay Corps, which later becomes the Supply Corps. 1942 - First photographic interpretation unit set up in the Pacific. 1958 - In response to request by President of Lebanon, Sixth Fleet lands 1


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 16

USS Missouri in the Panama canal, Miraflores Locks. (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 16 1862 - Congress creates rank of Rear Admiral. David G. Farragut is named the first Rear Admiral 1912 - Rear Admiral Bradley Fiske receives patent for torpedo plane or airborne torpedo. 1915 - First Navy ships, battleships Ohio, Missouri


Historic Navy Ship Baylander Shortly Open to New Yorkers

ex-USS Baylander: Photo credit Baylander

An historic U.S. Navy vessel that was originally deployed during Vietnam and later used to train U.S. helicopter pilots will temporarily dock at Pier 5 of Brooklyn Bridge Park (BBP) and for the first time be open for public tours. Free walk-up tours of the 'Baylander' are currently scheduled for


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 17

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 17 1858 - U.S. sloop Niagara departs Queenstown, Ireland, to assist in laying first trans-Atlantic telegraph cable. 1898 - Santiago, Cuba surrenders to U.S. Naval forces. 1927 - First organized dive bombing attack in combat by Marine Corps pilots against


Passengers Taken Off Stranded Savannah Casino Boat

Casino boat rescue: Photo USCG

The U.S. Coast Guard informs that the casino boat 'Escapade' is moored at its homeport and is no longer aground in Calibogue Sound near Tybee Island, Georgia. Watchstanders at Coast Guard Station Tybee Island were notified the Escapade had ran aground with 94 passengers and 31 staff and


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 18

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 18 1775 - Continental Congress resolves that each colony provide armed vessels 1779 - Commodore Abraham Whipple's squadron captures 11 prizes in largest prize value of Revolutionary War. 1792 - John Paul Jones dies in Paris, France


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 21

David G. Farragut

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 21 1823 - After pirate attack, Lt. David G. Farragut leads landing party to destroy pirate stronghold in Cuba. 1944 - Invasion and recapture of Guam begins. 1946 - In first U.S. test of adaptability of jet aircraft to shipboard operations


Coast Guard Foundation's “BUY A BRICK” a Big Success

Sample of the commemorative bricks available for the Sault Ste. Marie project

The Coast Guard Foundation, a non-profit organization committed to the education and welfare of Coast Guard members and their families, announced today that its Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan community center program is nearing its goal and that the “Buy a Brick” program is a key


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 22

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 22 1802 - Frigate Constellation defeats nine Corsair gunboats off Tripoli. 1905 - Body of John Paul Jones moved to Annapolis, Md. for reburial. 1953 - U.S. ships laid down heavy barrage to support UN troops in Korea


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 23

The watch crew in the control room of the USS Nautilus (SSN-571) maintain exact course and depth while the ship is passing under the polar ice gap. U.S. Navy Photo.

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 23 1947 - First Navy all jet squadron (VF-17A) receives its first aircraft (FH). 1948 - USS Putnum (DD-757) evacuates U.N. team from Haifa, Israel and becomes first U.S. Navy ship to fly the U.N. flag.


Today in U.S. Naval History: July 24

Today in U.S. Naval History - July 24 1813- Sailing Master Elijah Mix attempts to blow up British warship Plantagenet with a torpedo near Cape Henry, Virginia. 1944 - Following 43 days of naval gunfire and air bombardment, Naval Task Force lands Marines on Tinian.






 
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