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This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History – October 28

1919-Congress passed the National Prohibition Enforcement Act, otherwise known as the Volstead Act, on this date.  The Volstead Act authorized the enforcement of the 18th Amendment, ratified on 29 January 1919.  The Act authorized the Coast Guard to prevent the maritime importation of illegal alcohol.  This led to the largest increase in the size and responsibilities of the service to that date. 1943-Choiseul, Treasury Islands landing (Coast Guard-manned LST-71 was in second echelon November 1, 1943). 1991-Thousands of Haitian migrants began fleeing their homeland after the overthrow of Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide, prompting one of the largest SAR operations in Coast Guard history.  Cutters and aircraft from as far north as New England converged on the Windward Passage.  In the first 30 days of the operation, Coast Guard forces rescued more than 6,300 men, women, and children who left Haiti in grossly overloaded and unseaworthy vessels.  75 Coast Guard units ultimately took part in the massive SAR operation and by the end of the year over 40,000 Haitian migrants were rescued. (Source: USCG Historian’s Office)  


Michelle Obama Christens ShipConstructor-Designed Vessel

Image courtesy ShipConstructor

On Friday, July 23, First Lady of the United States, Michelle Obama christened the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Stratton, a vessel that was detail designed and production engineered by Northrop Grumman using ShipConstructor CAD/CAM software. Stratton is the first Coast Guard patrol cutter to be named after a woman in more than 20 years. The ship is named in honor of Dorothy Constance Stratton, the first female commissioned officer in Coast Guard history


News: Deepwater Program Kicks Off Down South

An important milestone, and one of the first building projects in the $17 billion transformation of the U.S. Coast Guard, took place earlier this month at Bollinger Shipyards, Inc., Lockport, La., with the decommissioning of the 110-ft. Island Class Patrol Boat, USCG Matagorda. While seemingly contradictory, the vessel's decommissioning is only temporary as during the next nine months, it will undergo extensive modifications and re-emerge as a larger 123-ft


This Day in Coast Guard History - Jan. 15

1836- A General Order from the Secretary of the Treasury prescribed that "Blue cloth be substituted for the uniform dress of the officers of the Revenue Cutter Service, instead of grey. . ." thereby ending a controversy that ad brewed for years regarding the uniforms of the Service. 1947- The first helicopter flight to the base "Little America" in Antarctica took place.  The pilot was LT James A


This Day in Coast Guard History – August 25

1945-CGC Magnolia was rammed amidships on 25 August 1945 by the cargo ship SS Marguerite Lehand off Mobile Bay.  She sank in two minutes and one of her crew was killed.  The other 49 were rescued.  Those survivors cross-decked to the new tender CGC Salvia (WAGL-400) which then took Magnolia's place. 1950-SS Benevolence collided with SS Mary Luckenbach.  CGC Gresham and other vessels responded and rescued 407 persons.


Today in U.S. Naval History: April 1

USS Bush (DD 529), USS Colhoun (DD 801) and other vessels sank after Japanese kamikazes attacked them off the coast of Okinawa. Both the Bush and Colhoun shot down several Japanese planes during the attack. (U.S. Navy photo)

Today in U.S. Naval History - April 1 1893 - Navy General Order 409 of February 25, 1893 establishes the rate of Chief Petty Officer as of this date. 1917 - Boatswain's Mate 1/c John I. Eopolucci, a Naval Armed Guard on board the steamship Aztec, died when the vessel was sunk by a German U-boat. He was the first U.S. Navy sailor killed in action in World War I. 1942 - First Naval Air Transportation Service (NATS) squadron for Pacific operations commissioned


This Day in Coast Guard History – Oct. 22

1853-The English ship Western World grounded off Spring Lake, New Jersey, during a gale with about 600 persons on board. Everyone was rescued using equipment at the nearby station. 1960-Early in the morning, SS Alcoa Corsair and SS Lorenzo Marcello collided near the mouth of the Mississippi River. Although the Lorenzo Marcello suffered no casualties and proceeded to New Orleans, Alcoa Corsair had 8 fatalities, 9 injured, and 1 missing, besides being forced to beach because of severe damages


This Day in U.S. Coast Guard History - February 28

1867-  As ordered by the Treasury Department, each officer of Revenue Cutter Service, while on duty, was entitled to one Navy ration per day.   1871- Congress passed 16 Stat. 458 which addressed shortcomings in previous legislation regarding the inspection and certification of steamboats and their crews.  This Act established the Steamboat Inspection Service within the Department of Treasury headed by a Supervisory Inspector General answerable to the Treasury Secretary


Today in U.S. Naval History: December 2

USS Enterprise (CVN-65). U.S. Navy photo by Photographers Mate Airman Rob Gaston

Today in U.S. Naval History - December 2 1775 - Congress orders first officers commissions printed. 1908 - Rear Admiral William S. Cowles submits report, prepared by Lt. George C. Sweet, recommending purchase of aircraft suitable for operating from naval ships on scouting and observation mission to Secretary of the Navy. 1941 - First Naval Armed Guard detachment (seven men under a coxswain) of World War II reports to Liberty ship, SS Dunboyne,


Senators Ask USCG to Publish Cruise Inspection Information

Photo: Greg Trauthwein

U.S. Sens. Blumenthal, Rockefeller, Markey call on Coast Guard to make cruise ship inspection information available to public; Senators also call on Coast Guard to detail how inspection information will be used to hold cruise ships with safety problems accountable In a letter to U.S. Coast Guard Admiral Robert Papp, Jr., U.S. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), John D. (Jay) Rockefeller IV (D-W.V.), Chairman of the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and Edward J


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 28

U.S. aircraft carrier USS Boxer (CVA-21). U.S. Navy photo

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 28 1867 - Capt. William Reynolds of Lackawanna raises U.S. flag over Midway Island and took formal possession of these islands for the U.S. 1942 - 120 women, commissioned directly as ENS or LTJG, reported to "USS Northampton


Jones Act is Critical to Conn. Economy

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (left) and Rep. Joe Courtney (Photo: American Maritime Partnership)

Study shows Connecticut shipbuilding industry worth $2.5 billion to state’s economy, supports nearly 23,000 jobs The American Maritime Partnership (AMP) joined with the Shipbuilders Council of America (SCA) to highlight new data that shows Connecticut ranks fourth among all states in


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 29

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 29 1861 - U.S. squadron captures forts at Hatteras Inlet, N.C. 1862 - Union gunboat Pittsburgh support Army troops in landing at Eunice, Arkansas 1915 - Navy salvage divers raise F-4, first U.S. submarine sunk in accident


USCG Repatriates 86 Migrants

USCG Repatriates 86 Migrants

  Coast Guard crews aboard the Coast Guard Cutter Charles David Jr. and the Coast Guard Cutter Valiant repatriated 86 migrants illegally migrating from Cuba and Haiti. These repatriations are a result of five separate interdictions of people attempting to illegally migrate to the United


USCG Rescues 164 Migrants in a Week

Crewmembers of the Coast Guard Cutter Paul Clark rescued 100 Haitian migrants from a grossly overloaded sail freighter in Bahamian waters and safely embarked them onto the cutter on August 11, 2014. U.S. Coast Guard Photo

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) rescued 64 Cuban migrants and 100 Haitian migrants during a busy week of illegal maritime migration attempts from Cuba and Haiti into the United States. The 64 Cuban migrants were repatriated last week following three separate interdictions at sea in the Florida


Ingalls Shipbuilding Christens 5th National Security Cutter

Charlene James Benoit, great-great niece of Capt. Joshua James, smashes a bottle across the bow of the Ingalls-built National Security Cutter James (WMSL 754). Supporting her are (left to right) Capt. Andrew Tiongson, the s

  Huntington Ingalls Industries' (NYSE:HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division christened the company's fifth U.S. Coast Guard National Security Cutter (NSC), James (WMSL 754), today in front of nearly 1,000 guests. Charlene James Benoit, great-great niece of the ship's namesake, Capt


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 18

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 18 1838 - Exploring Expedition under Lt. Charles Wilkes embarks on world cruise. 1911 - First Navy Nurse Corps superintendent, Esther Voorhees Hasson, appointed 1965 - First major amphibious assault in Vietnam, Operation Starlight captures 2


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 19

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 19 1812 - USS Constitution captures HMS Guerriere. 1812- Devastating hurricane struck the Navy's New Orleans station, delaying military preparations in the War of 1812 1818 - Capt. James Biddle takes possession of Oregon Territory for U.S.


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 20

Image: NOAA

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 20 1952 - In interservice air operation at Chang Pyong-ni, Korea, U.S. Navy, Marine and Air Force aircraft destroy 80 percent of assigned area. 1959 - USS Thetis Bay (LPH-6) completes six-day humanitarian operation after floods in Taiwan.


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 21

USS Trenton making Sail, probably while in New York Harbor in the mid-1880s. The original print is a letterpress reproduction of a photograph by E.H. Hart, 1162 Broadway, New York City, published circa the 1880s by the Photo-Gravure Company, New York. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 21 1800 - U.S. Marine Corps Band gave its first concert in Washington, D.C. 1883 - Installation of the first electric lighting on a US Navy Ship completed on USS Trenton. 1920 - Radio station built by U.S


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 22

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 22 1912 - Birthday of Dental Corps 1945 - First surrender of Japanese garrison at end of World War II; USS Levy receives surrender of Mille Atoll in Marshall Islands 1980 - USS Passumpsic rescues 28 Vietnamese refugees


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 25

USS Essex (CV-9). Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 25 1843 - Steam frigate Missouri arrives at Gibralter completing first Trans-Atlantic crossing by U.S. steam powered ship. 1942 - Five Navy nurses who became POWs on Guam repatriated . 1951 - 23 fighters from USS Essex (CV-9) escort Air Force heavy


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 26

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 26 1775 - Rhode Island Resolve: Rhode Island delegates to Continental Congress press for creation of Continental Navy to protect the colonies 1839 - Brig Washington seizes Spanish slaver, Amistad near Montauk Point, N.Y.


Today in U.S. Naval History: August 27

USS Observation Island (E-AG-154). U.S. Navy photo

Today in U.S. Naval History - August 27 1917 - Squadron of minesweepers departs U.S. for service off France 1944 - USS Stingray (SS-186) lands men and supplies on Luzon, Philippines to support guerilla operations against the Japanese.


Unmanned Aircraft Makes USCG Icebreaker Landing

UAS takes to the air: Photo USCG

Coast Guard and National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration researchers report the successful landing of an unmanned aircraft system on the flight deck of Coast Guard Cutter 'Healy', marking the first time a UAS has completed a take-off and landing aboard a Coast Guard icebreaker.






 
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