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Uss Saratoga

Today in U.S. Naval History: April 21

Robert E. Peary (Photo courtesy Naval History & Heritage Command)

Today in U.S. Naval History - April 21 1861 - USS Saratoga captures slaver, Nightingale. 1898 - U.S. at war against Spain. 1906 - Commander Robert Peary discovered supposed Arctic Continent did not exist. 1972 - Moonwalk in the Descartes Highlands by Capt. John W. Young, USN Commander of Apollo 16. He was the ninth man to walk on the moon. LCDR Thomas K. Mattingly II, USN was the Command Module Pilot. During the 11 day, 1 hour and 51 minute mission, 213 lbs. of lunar material was collected. Recovery by HC-1 helicopters from USS Ticonderoga (CVS-14) For more information about naval history, visit the Naval History and Heritage Command website at history.navy.mil.


Special Pilotage in Port of Brownsville

It was no ordinary arrival for the Brazos-Santiago Pilots of Brownsville, Texas    The Brazos-Santiago Pilots handle some 600 ship and vessel transits through the Port of Brownsville each year, but it's not every day that they get the opportunity to guide a venerable and storied U.S. Navy carrier to its final destination.    "It's an especially proud honor to be a part of history and to pilot the USS Ranger on the final 15-mile leg of its 16


Navy to Christen New Guided-Missile Destroyer

The newest Arleigh Burke class guided-missile destroyer, Forrest Sherman will be christened on Saturday, Oct. 2, 2004, during a 10 a.m. CST ceremony at Northrop Grumman Ship Systems in Pascagoula, Miss. Sen. Thad Cochran of Mississippi will deliver the ceremony’s principal address. Ann Sherman Fitzpatrick will serve as sponsor of the ship named for her father. In the time-honored Navy tradition, she will break the bottle of champagne


This Day in Naval History - Jan. 24

From the Navy News Service 1942 - During the World War II Battle of Makassar Strait, U.S. destroyers attack a Japanese convoy in the first naval surface action in the Pacific. 1986 - The Coral Sea (CV 43) and Saratoga (CV 60) carrier battle groups conduct freedom of navigation exercises in and near the Gulf of Sidra, demonstrating the long-standing United States' refusal to recognize Colonel Khadafi's attampt to include the gulf in Libyan territorial waters,


This Day in Naval History – Feb. 25

1861 - Saratoga, member of U.S. African Squadron, captures slaver sloop Express 1933 - Commissioning of USS Ranger, first true aircraft carrier 1959 - USS Galveston fires first Talos surface-to-air missile (Source: Navy News Service)


This Day In Naval History: June 6

USS Antietam (CG 54) (U.S. Navy photo by James G. McCarter)

1850 - The brig USS Perry, commanded by Lt. Andrew H. Foote, captures American slaver Martha off Ambriz (near the city of Luanda), Angola, Africa.   1918 - After Allied troops take Hill 142 at Chateau-Thierry, France, during World War I, 12 enemy soldiers crawl in a position to counter attack with five light machine guns. Realizing his company might withdraw if fired upon, Marine Gunnery Sgt. Maj. Ernest A. Janson, quickly rushes and bayonets two enemy leaders


SCI Develops Premiere Fire Training Dedicated to Inland Mariners

Inland mariners are suppressing staged fires on a towboat superstructure in a new "hands-on" safety course developed by Seamen's Church Institute's Center for Maritime Education Paducah, Ky. SCI's creative initiative brought together the City of Paducah, a local college, and the maritime industry to create the first-ever fire safety course designed specifically for those who work the rivers. Developed in response to updated U.S


Navy Ships Evade Hurricane Isabel

USS George Washington (CVN 73) Navy photo by Photographer's Mate Airman Joan Kretschmer Commander, 2nd Fleet ordered ships based in Hampton Roads in southeastern Virginia to get underway Sept. 16, to avoid potential damage to ships and piers from anticipated hurricane force winds and high tidal surges. Ships currently underway will stay out to sea until Hurricane Isabel passes. Vice Adm. Gary Roughead, commander of the U.S


This Day in U.S. Naval History – November 3

1853 - USS Constitution seizes suspected slaver H. N. Gambrill. 1931 - Dirigible USS Los Angeles makes 10 hour flight out of NAS Lakehurst, NJ, carrying 207 persons, establishing a new record for the number of passengers carried into the air by a single craft. 1943 - Battleship Oklahoma, sunk at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941, is refloated. 1956 - USS Cambria (APA-36) removes 24 members of United Nations Truce Commission team from the Gaza Strip.


This Day In Naval History: June 24

1833 - The frigate Constitution is the first vessel to enter the newly-built dry dock at the Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, Mass. for overhaul. A false rumor circulates in Boston in 1830 that the U.S. Navy intends to scrap the ship; young Oliver Wendell Holmes pens his poem "Old Ironsides", becoming a rallying cry to save the ship.    1944 - Torpedo bomber TBM aircraft (VC 69) from USS Bogue (CVE 9) sink Japanese submarine (I 52), 800 miles southwest of Fayal, Azores.


This Day In Naval History: July 25

Ships Sponsor, Naunita Harmon Carroll, and her party at the Fore River Shipyard during the USS Harmon (DE 678) launching ceremonies in Quincy, Mass. on July 25, 1943. (U.S. Navy photo from the Naval History and Heritage Command)

1898 - During the Spanish-American War, a landing party from the armed yacht, USS Gloucester, single-handedly captures Guanica, Puerto Rico. 1943 - The first Navy ship named for an African-American, USS Harmon (DE 678), is launched. USS Harmon is named in honor of Mess Attendant 1st Class


HII Names Leonard a Corporate Director

Joseph J. Leonard (Photo: Huntington Ingalls Industries)

Capt. Joseph J. Leonard (U.S. Navy, Ret.) has joined Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) as corporate director of customer affairs, large surface combatant program, the shipbuilder announced.   In his new role, Leonard will provide solutions in the development and implementation of


New Details Emerge on Loss of USS Indianapolis

USS Indianapolis (CA 35) on July 27, 1945 heading for sea from Apra Harbor, Guam.  This is likely the last photo taken of the ship. (U.S. Navy Photo by Gus Buono, from the Collection of David Buell)

A Naval History and Heritage Command (NHHC) historian has recently uncovered information that sheds new light on the loss of the World War II cruiser USS Indianapolis (CA 35).   In the final days of the war, Indianapolis completed a top secret mission to deliver components of the atomic


This Day In Naval History: July 27

Guests arrive for the commissioning of the nuclear-powered attack submarine Providence (SSN-719) on July 27, 1985. (U.S. Navy photo by Joan Zopf, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection)

1776 - During the American Revolution, the Continental brig, Reprisal, commanded by Capt. Lambert Wickes, transports the newly appointed commercial and naval agent, William Bingham, to Martinique. While en route, the British sloop-of-war, HMS Shark, approaches the brig at the entrance to St


Austal Bags $ 11 mi USS Jackson Modification Contract

Independence variant Littoral Combat Ship USS Jackson (LCS 6) has completed the first of three scheduled full-ship shock trials. (U.S. Navy photo by Michael Bevan)

Austal Limited (Austal) (ASX:ASB) has been awarded a US$11,239,032 cost-plus-fixed-fee contract modification from the U.S. Navy to provide emergent availability planning and full ship shock trials (FSST) support for tests to be conducted on Littoral Combat Ship USS JACKSON (LCS 6).


This Day In Naval History: July 06

1747 - John Paul Jones is born in Arbigland, Scotland. Originally appointed to the Continental Navy in 1775, he is known for his quote, Ive not yet begun to fight! during the battle between Continental frigate, Bonhomme Richard, and HMS Serapis on Sept. 23, 1779.  


This Day In Naval History: July 7

The first six enlisted women are: Front row: (left to right) Chief Yeoman Wilma J. Marchal, USN; Yeoman Second Class Edna E. Young, USN; Hospital Corpsman First Class Ruth Flora, USN Second row: (left to right) Aviation Storekeeper First Class Kay L. Langen, USN; (hidden behind the front row): Storekeeper Second Class Frances T. Devaney, USN; and Teleman Doris R. Robertson, USN. (NHHC Photo)

1798 - Congress rescinds treaties with France, and the Quasi War begins. 1846 - During the Mexican-American War, Commodore John D. Sloat, disembarks from his flagship frigate, USS Savannah, at Monterey and claims California for the U.S.


This Day In Naval History: July 11

(Official U.S. Navy photo by Joan M. Zopf, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection)

1798 - President John Adams signs an act that reestablishes the Marine Corps under the Constitution. The following day, Maj. William W. Burrows is appointed Commandant of the Marine Corps.   1918 - Henry Ford launches the first of the 100 intended Eagle boats


This Day In Naval History: July 12

U.S. Navy fighter aircraft perform a flyover at the conclusion of the commissioning ceremony of the aircraft carrier USS Ronald Reagan (CVN-76). (U.S. Navy photo by Rusty Black)

1836 - Charles H. Haswell is commissioned as the first regularly appointed Engineer Officer. In Oct. 1844, he is promoted to Engineer in Chief of the Navy.    1916 - The AB-3 flying boat, piloted by Lt. Godfrey de Chevalier, is catapulted from USS North Carolina (ACR 12) while underway


This Day In Naval History: July 13

Richard Byrd (Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress)

1812 - The frigate, USS Essex, commanded by Capt. David Porter, captures the merchant brig, Lamprey, in the Atlantic.    1854 - The sloop of war, USS Cyane, bombards San Juan del Norte (Greytown), Nicaragua, in retaliation for ill-treatment of U.S. citizens


This Day In Naval History: July 14

1813 - During the War of 1812, Lt. John M. Gamble becomes the first Marine to command a ship in battle, USS Greenwich, when she captures British whaling ship Seringapatam.    1853 - Commodore Matthew C. Perry lands and holds the first meeting with the Japanese at Uraga


This Day In Naval History: July 15

Oregon (BB-3) (IUSN photo # NH 42972, courtesy of Allan J. Drugan, copied from Album of Lewis H. Rockey, from the collections of the U.S. Naval Historical Center.)

1862 - While CSS Arkansas makes her way down the Yazoo River, she encounters the Union gunboats USS Carondelet, USS Tyler, and USS Queen of the West. In the ensuing battle, CSS Arkansas damages the first two vessels and makes her way into the Mississippi River


LCS 6 Completes Full Ship Shock Trials

The shock trials are designed to demonstrate ships ability to withstand the effects of nearby underwater explosion and retain required capability. Photo Austal

Austal Limited successfully completed Full Shock Trials by USS Jackson(LCS 6) on July 16, 21016.   The Navy stated that USS Jackson (LCS 6) “performed exceptionally well” during her third and final underwater explosion as part of her Full Ship Shock Trials (FSST)


US Navy Tests Latest Aegis Weapon System

Rear Adm. Chris Grady, commander, Naval Surface Force Atlantic, greets Minister Pedro Morenes, Spanish Minister of Defense prior to Morenes embarking Spanish Navy Ship Cristobol Colon (F-105) Naval Station Norfolk. PhotoUSN

The U.S. Navy conducted a series of cooperative air defense test exercises with the Spanish navy that culminated in live missile firing events using the latest Aegis Weapon System baseline July 20-21. The event was not only the first interoperability test of the latest Aegis Baseline 9


NASSCO Bags USS Oak Hill Modification Award

USS Oak Hill Photo USN

General Dynamics NASSCO-Norfolk was awarded a $42 million cost-plus-award-fee modification to a previously awarded contract for the repair and alteration for the USS Oak Hill (LSD-51). NASSCO-Norfolk will provide ship repair services including engine replacement/repairs






 
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