Survey: Seafarers are Burdened by Administrative Tasks

MarineLink.com
Thursday, October 24, 2013

Seafarers feel they spend too much time on tasks they consider to be an administrative burden according to the findings of a study by the Danish Maritime Authority, supported by InterManager, the international trade association for ship and crew managers.

A comprehensive survey of international seafarers revealed that a third of all nationalities are annoyed or frustrated by administrative burdens in the maritime sector. These burdens stem from what the seafarers consider to be unnecessary repetition of tasks and demands for too much paperwork and documentation to be handled.

The study also concludes that there is a “significant potential to relocate time to more fruitful tasks” to increase efficiency and quality.

The study, which surveyed almost 2,000 anonymous seafarers from 59 different nationalities, asked 55 questions to understand the characteristics and perceptions of administrative burden and the different types of work-related activities perceived as administrative burdens among seafarers.

The survey concentrated on seven main areas of work: preparation of and participation in Port State Control, Flag State Control or Class inspections; vetting inspections; handling of International Vessel and Port Facility Security requirements (including paperwork and mandatory deck watch duties); planning and executing exercises and drills; using and maintaining internal management systems (QSM, ISM etc); completion of journals (garbage, oil, deviation etc); and the completion of port and pre-arrival documents (such as crew and passenger lists, vessel stores, port calls, health declarations etc).

At least 50% of those responding – and sometimes as many as 79% – felt the tasks were repeated too often and required too much documentation and paperwork. The report concluded that “a lot of paperwork and documentation that is being produced on the job contributes little value to the work of the seafarers”.

Port and pre-arrival documentation proved particularly problematic with many seafarers feeling a lot of the paperwork was superfluous. The report advised: “The qualitative comments from the seafarers give the general impression that the amount of necessary paperwork has exploded in recent years and in some cases taken time away from more urgent and meaningful tasks in terms of guaranteeing ship safety. Seafarers suggest easing the rigid control slightly and instead putting more focus on culture and competencies in order to effectively and meaningfully improve efficiency and safety on vessels.”

The report states that “many seafarers are frustrated because they feel that the time usages are disproportionate to the gains of many of the tasks” and advises there is “a large potential to rationalise and/or digitalise at least some of the processes”.

In addition, the report underlines the fact that “seafarers and shipowners” understand the rationale underlying most procedures and requirements even though these may lead to administrative burdens. They acknowledge that such procedures are not implemented with the aim of being a burden but that they in principle serve higher-end objectives like personal safety and environmental protection.”

It points out there is scope for developing “work smart, easy-to-use” digital solutions to reduce paperwork and time consuming manual workflows, particularly in relation to port and pre-arrival procedures. In addition the report recommends a revived focus on seamanship and safety culture with a view to reducing the number of procedures and burdens and advises of a potential for increased co-operation and dialogue between stakeholders in all areas of the maritime sector.

InterManager Secretary General, Captain Kuba Szymanski, said: “InterManager members and their crews were happy to take part in this important survey. The amount of time seafarers report they are spending on administrative tasks is eye-opening and we welcome the report’s suggestion for further investigation into how these requirements can be better complied with to enable smarter working.”
 

Maritime Reporter August 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Ports

Fire at Los Angeles Port Stops Container Traffic

Thick smoke from a smoldering fire started by a welder's torch at the Port of Los Angeles was preventing the movement of containers at the facility on Tuesday,

Air Pollution Continues Decline at Port of Long Beach

Diesel air pollution from ships, trucks, trains and other big machines at the Port of Long Beach has declined by 82 percent since 2005, a comprehensive air quality analysis has found.

New Rotation of CMA CGM Joint Service Unveiled

CMA CGM S.A. (CMA CGM) announced the rotation of its new service in cooperation with China Shipping Container Lines (CSCL), Orient Overseas Container Lines (OOCL)

Environmental

Last Call to Register for SHIPPINGInsight

Maritime industry conference and exhibition opens next week in Stamford, Conn. There’s still time to register online for SHIPPINGInsight 2014, the North American

Air Pollution Continues Decline at Port of Long Beach

Diesel air pollution from ships, trucks, trains and other big machines at the Port of Long Beach has declined by 82 percent since 2005, a comprehensive air quality analysis has found.

Innovative Thrawls Help Reduce the Enviromental Impact

Fishing Company Cornelis Vrolijk, based in IJmuiden, The Netherlands, and its subsidiary Jaczon, based in Scheveningen, The Netherlands, are specialized in pelagic fishing.

News

Coast Guard Foundation to Honor Longtime Supporter

National Tribute Set for Thursday, October 9, 2014 The Coast Guard Foundation, a nonprofit organization committed to the education and welfare of all Coast Guard members and their families,

Suncor Sends First Tanker of Western Canada Heavy Crude to Europe

Canada's largest oil and gas producer, Suncor Energy Inc, is shipping its first ever tanker of Western Canadian heavy crude from Canada's East Coast to Europe, a company spokeswoman said on Tuesday.

Pivotal to Deliver LNG to Carib for use in Puerto Rico

Pivotal LNG, Inc., a subsidiary of AGL Resources, announced this week a long-term agreement to sell liquefied natural gas (LNG) to Crowley Maritime Corp. subsidiary Carib Energy LLC (Carib).

Maritime Safety

USCG Cutter Collides with Fishing Vessel off Puerto Rico

The U.S. Coast Guard is investigating a collision Tuesday between the Coast Guard Cutter Key Largo and the 42-foot commercial fishing vessel, Sea Shepherd, approximately

Fire at Los Angeles Port Stops Container Traffic

Thick smoke from a smoldering fire started by a welder's torch at the Port of Los Angeles was preventing the movement of containers at the facility on Tuesday,

Too Many Passengers Lands Ferry Company in Court

Carrying numbers of passengers, including schoolchildren, far in excess of its license, has cost representatives of a Hampshire ferry company fines and costs totaling £12,340.

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2199 sec (5 req/sec)