KCI Konecranes to Supply Goliath Crane to Ingalls

Friday, September 24, 1999
KCI Konecranes has won the contract to supply one of the world's largest cranes to Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Miss. The crane, in a category known as Goliath due to its massive size, is one of fewer than 100 in the world. Eighty percent of the Goliath cranes built in the past decade have been built by KCI Konecranes. Ingalls has announced a major facility refit program that will directly benefit a variety of shipbuilding programs for Ingalls military and commercial customers. The shipyard recently was contracted to build the first cruise ships in the U.S. in more than 40 years for American Classic Voyages, Co. Under the terms of the contract, with a potential value of $1.4 billion for three ships, Ingalls will initially build two 1,900 passenger cruise ships. These will be the largest cruise ships ever built in the U.S., with the first scheduled to enter service in the Hawaiian Islands in early 2003. The 660-ton capacity of the Goliath Crane will enable Ingalls to assemble sections of ships three times larger than previously, and better utilize dock space, enhancing efficiency for every ship built. The 329 ft. tall Goliath will allow Ingalls to lift, not only heavier, but taller sections. Resembling a giant sawhorse, the crane spans 411 ft., and employs 96 wheels to travel down a delineated runway. The crane has two trollies, dual self-controlled diesel power plants, and features AC variable frequency controls with built-in programmable logic. An elevator running up one leg of the crane provides access to machinery, controls and operator's cabin. The crane is scheduled to be operable in the first quarter of 2001. It will be erected in a turnkey contract by Crane Pro 21, a division of KCI in Houston, and a specialist in marine projects.
Maritime Reporter June 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Navigation Offshore Oil Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1320 sec (8 req/sec)