Tug Company to Pay Nearly $1M for Seagrass Damage

Friday, January 10, 2003
Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company of Oak Brook, Ilinois will pay nearly $1 million for damages to seagrass and other resources in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, the Justice Department and the Commerce Department's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced today.

The $969,000 settlement reached on behalf of NOAA and the State of Florida is the largest ever obtained for damages to seagrass in the sanctuary. The funds, combined with an earlier $618,485 settlement obtained from co-defendant Coastal Marine Towing, will help restore the injured areas and reimburse NOAA for response costs. "We are thrilled with the settlement," said Sharon Shutler, attorney for the NOAA General Counsel for Natural Resources. "We wanted to restore this site in 1993 when the groundings occurred. Now we finally have the means to restore these important Sanctuary resources." In May 1993, four tug boats owned by the two companies were transporting heavy dredging equipment and dredge pipes from the Boca Grande Channel off Florida's west coast to Green Cove Spring on the east coast. Before the flotilla reached Seven Mile Bridge off Marathon, Florida, one or more of the dredge pipes being towed by one of the tugs came loose and dragged across the bottom of Florida Bay, causing a scar 13 miles long and destroying 196,764 square feet of seagrass and other sanctuary resources. The dragging pipe caused the tug to slow and another tug attempted to pass her. The other vessel ran hard aground, creating a massive hole and destroying 80,675 square feet of seagrass and coral, about one and a half times the size of a football field, at an area called Red Bay Banks off Marathon. While the coral reefs are the sanctuary's most famous resource, seagrass meadows and other habitats, such as the mixed seagrass and finger coral bottom at Red Bay Banks, are critical to fish and other marine life populations. Seagrass also filters and stabilizes sediments, helping to create clear waters.

"The restoration of our natural resources is one of our top priorities," said Tom Sansonetti, Assistant Attorney General for the Justice Department's Environment and Natural Resources Division. "The funds provided as a result of today's settlement will help us come closer to achieving this goal in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary." The National Marine Sanctuaries Act authorizes NOAA to seek damages from the responsible party in a grounding to cover response costs, injury and damage assessment costs, costs to restore or replace the damaged habitat or acquire equivalent habitat, and costs to compensate the public for the value of the damage resources until they fully recover. NOAA developed a restoration strategy that involved stabilizing the blowhole and transplanting seagrasses into off-site areas damaged by boats to compensate for the lost services provided by the resources destroyed in the incident. NOAA sought the cost of the restoration and assessment costs from the two companies, eventually filing suit in Federal District Court. Both the Federal District Court and the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals found Great Lakes strictly liable for the injuries to sanctuary resources. Both courts upheld NOAA's methodologies for determining the appropriate amount of compensatory restoration, however, the courts had not agreed on the proper measure of damages necessary to restore the bank. As a result, a settlement was reached with the two companies. The NOAA Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary, designated in 1990, protects 2,896 square nautical miles of critical marine habitat, including coral reef, hardbottom, seagrass meadows, mangrove communities and sand flats. NOAA and the Florida Department of Environmental Protection manage the sanctuary.

Maritime Today

The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter November 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds


It's All in the Planning

Continuing voracious demand for mined materials in China, India and other developing nations has led to an associated requirement for increased bulk terminal capacity

Alfa Laval Debuts Inline Scrubber Design

Alfa Laval’s PureSOx exhaust gas cleaning system platform now includes an inline scrubber design: I-design.   “Through open-loop, closed-loop and hybrid arrangements,

Fugro to Survey off Equatorial Guinea

Fugro has been awarded a contract by Ophir Equatorial Guinea (Block R) Limited for the provision of survey services for the development of large scale assets and

Passenger Vessels

Indonesia Ferry Hits Trouble, 97 Rescued

Almost 100 people were rescued when a ferry sailing towards Singapore from the Indonesian island of Batam hit a floating object and reportedly started to sink, authorities in the city-state said.

Extended Warranty from Yanmar for Sailboat Engines

Yanmar Marine International B.V. has introduced an extended 3 years’ period of YANMAR Limited Warranty for Sailboat Engine Models. This extended warranty of

Norwegian Escape with Biggest Scrubbers sets Sail

On a sunny October day in the German harbor-town of Hamburg, M/V Norwegian Escape, a brand new cruise ship, sets sail for the first time. On board are five Yara SOx scrubbers – one for each engine.

Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Navigation Pipelines Port Authority Salvage Ship Repair Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0832 sec (12 req/sec)