New Maritime Strategy Released

Friday, October 19, 2007
The Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard have released "A Cooperative Strategy for 21st Century Seapower," a unified maritime strategy that explains the comprehensive role of the sea services in an era marked by increased globalization and change. This is the first time a unified maritime strategy has been signed by all three of the sea services. The strategy integrates seapower with other elements of national power in addition to that of friends, partners and allies. It states that protecting the homeland and winning the nation's wars is matched by a corresponding commitment to preventing war. Additionally, it codifies the requirement for continued development and application of existing core capabilities of forward presence, deterrence, sea control and power projection, while recognizing the need for expanded capabilities of maritime security and humanitarian assistance and disaster response. "This strategy addresses the balance of capabilities of our maritime services. It reaffirms our core capabilities of forward presence, deterrence, sea control and power projection. It also commits our maritime forces to increased international cooperation for the benefit of all," said Adm. Gary Roughead, Chief of Naval Operations. "It reflects the expectation of the people of the United States to be a strong maritime force to protect our homeland and work collaboratively with partners around the world to secure and stabilize the global waterways that are critical to our prosperity." "While we must maintain a balance of forces to be able to deliver credible combat power as deterrence, we also believe preventing wars is as important as winning wars," said Gen. James Conway, Commandant, U.S. Marine Corps. "We need to be the most ready when the nation is least ready." "Keeping the seas safe and secure from a broad range of threats and hazards is in everyone's best interest," said Adm. Thad Allen, Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard. "The key to global prosperity and security is through cooperation and coordination." The strategy codifies the requirement for continued development and application of existing core capabilities - forward presence, deterrence, sea control and power projection - while recognizing the need for expanded capabilities of maritime security and humanitarian assistance and disaster response. The strategy was developed collaboratively, using an open and inclusive approach that drew upon the insights of academic, business, civic and military leaders and strategists. The resulting strategy binds maritime services more closely together than they have ever been before to promote stability, security and prosperity at home and abroad. A copy of the strategy is available on the Navy website at http://www.navy.mil.
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