Hyundai Heavy Leads Shipyard Decline on Prices

Tuesday, January 29, 2008
Hyundai Heavy Industries Co., led a decline in South Korean shipyard stocks in Seoul trading on concern prices for new vessels may drop. Hyundai Heavy fell 5.8 percent, the biggest decline in more than a week, to close at 319,500 won in Seoul. Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co., a unit of Hyundai Heavy, fell 7.1 percent to 201,500 won. The shares also dropped after UBS AG said orders may slow this year from the record sales in 2007.

The price for second-hand bulk carriers was as much as 61 percent more than for new vessels last year because of increased demand for iron ore and coal from China and India. Shipyards in South Korea, the world's biggest shipbuilding nation, increased their order backlog last year, even with ship prices at records. The Baltic Dry Index, a benchmark for the price of shipping bulk commodities, has almost halved from an all-time high of 11,039 in November on concerns a U.S. economic recession may lead to a decline in global trade. Hyundai Heavy was the biggest decliner among 50 top companies traded on South Korea's Kospi index.

Shipyards in South Korea, the world's biggest shipbuilding nation, have orderbooks that stretch as far as into 2012. That is prompting shipbuilders to increase production to meet demand. ``The Korean shipbuilding sector could remain volatile in the near term, given weak new order expectations in 2008 from 2007,'' UBS analyst Son Yong Suk wrote in a note dated yesterday. He kept a ``buy'' rating for Hyundai Heavy shares. Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Engineering Co., the world's third-largest shipyard, dropped 1.2 percent to 34,100 won. Samsung Heavy Industries Co., the world's second-biggest, fell 0.5 percent to 28,350 won. STX Shipbuilding Co., the world's No. 5, shed 5.3 percent to 33,300 won. A capesize bulk carrier, the biggest of its type, cost about $97 million in December, 43 percent more than a year earlier, according to London-based Clarkson Plc, the world's biggest shipbroker. The price of a five-year vessel of the same size was 55 percent more expensive. Source: Bloomberg

Maritime Reporter November 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Navy

Damen Outfitting First of Nine Bahamas Patrol Boats

The first of nine Damen Stan Patrol 3007s ordered by the Royal Bahamas Defense Force has arrived at Damen Shipyards Gorinchem in the Netherlands for outfitting.

US Navy: Tortuga Allision Costs CO, XO Their Jobs

USS Tortuga's (LSD 46) Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Thomas Goudreau and Executive Officer, Cmdr. John Fleming, were relieved of their duties Dec. 16, due to loss of

Japan Gains Edge in Australia Submarine Deal

Australia and Japan appear to be inching closer to an agreement on the sale the top-secret technology from Japan to build a fleet of new generation submarines.

Finance

Larger Tankers May Offer Better Return Chances

Investors looking for returns in the tanker markets can invest their capital in a variety of ways. Should an owner invest in a VLCC or an Aframax? How about an

US Plans to Shut Royalty Loophole on Coal Exports

U.S. coal companies will no longer be able to settle royalties at low domestic prices when they make lucrative sales to Asia according to reforms proposed by the Interior Department on Friday.

Hapag-Lloyd Completes CSAV Merger Capital Increase

Hapag-Lloyd completed the planned capital increase of EUR 370 million (approximately $452.5 million) as part of the business combination with the Chilean shipping

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Ship Electronics Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1219 sec (8 req/sec)