Electronic Advance Manifest Information

Friday, November 21, 2003
The U.S. Bureau of Customs and Border Protection issued a Press Release stating that it will soon be promulgating its rules on presentation by carriers of electronic advance manifest information. The requirement will be similar to the current requirement that ocean carriers submit manifest information at least 24 hours prior to loading in a foreign port. The differences are that the new rules will require that all advance manifests be submitted electronically and the requirement will apply to all modes and for cargoes being imported or exported. For cargoes being exported by ship, the electronic manifest information will have to be submitted at least 24 hours prior to departure from the U.S. port where the cargo is laden. The requirement is to be phased in over the coming months. The new rule should be published in the Federal Register soon. Source: HK Law

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