Increased power for the Sulzer RTA96C

Thursday, March 15, 2001
Wärtsilä Corporation has increased the power outputs available from Sulzer RTA96C low-speed marine diesel engines by some four percent, and also added a 14-cylinder model to bring the maximum output available up to 80,080 kW (108,920 bhp). The higher powers and the 14-cylinder engine are intended to meet the requirements of shipowners and shipbuilders for both today's large, fast post-Panamax container ships and the next generation of larger ships of up to 10,000 TEU. The RTA96C now gives 5,720 kW (7,780 bhp) per cylinder maximum continuous output at 102 rpm. Thus the power output of the 12-cylinder RTA96C is increased from 65,880 kW (89,640 bhp) maximum continuous output to 68,640 kW (93,360 bhp). The RTA96C is the most powerful in the Sulzer RTA series of low-speed marine diesel engines. To date, a total of 84 RTA96C engines with eight, nine, ten, 11 and 12 cylinders in-line are in service or on order, having an aggregate output of 4,754 MW (6.47 million bhp).The increased outputs of the RTA96C engines are made possible by the very satisfactory service experience with the large number of RTA96C engines currently in service since the first began operation more than three years ago in October 1997. For example, engines in service are achieving diametral cylinder liner wear in the order of only 0.03 mm/1,000 hours. The new RTA96C engines have the same dimensions and masses as the existing RTA96C engines built to the latest design standard. They also have exactly the same brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC) and cylinder lubricating oil feed rate. Their times between overhauls are expected to be three years for major components. The NOx emissions of the RTA96C are within the limits set by the IMO regulation in Annex VI of the MARPOL 73/78 Convention.Principal particulars of the RTA96C(see PDF attachment)Media
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