LM6000 Gas Turbine Passes Test

Wednesday, August 24, 2005
GE Transportation announced that an LM6000 aeroderivative gas turbine recently completed the 500-hour power generation phase of endurance testing towards American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) certification. GE is seeking ABS certification to the Steel Vessel and the new Naval Vessel Rules for its LM6000.

GE plans to certify the LM6000 at a power level greater than 36 megawatts based on United States Navy standard day conditions (100oF). The 500-hour mechanical drive portion of testing will follow shortly, with GE on schedule to receive ABS certification in 2006.

The LM6000 being used in the ABS qualification test is a standard production LM6000PC liquid fuel engine, with no modifications required to meet ABS Naval Vessel Rules requirements. “We recently conducted a borescope inspection of the LM6000 on test, witnessed by the U.S. Navy,” said Karl Matson, general manager of GE Transportation’s marine business, Evendale, Ohio. “The inspection revealed that all hardware is in excellent condition.”

“By obtaining ABS certification, the LM6000 will be ideally suited for a number of the U.S. Navy’s next-generation programs that require electric and mechanical drive service, such as the U.S. Navy’s DD(X) and LCS programs,” Matson added.

The LM6000 is already certified for commercial marine use by Det Norske Veritas (DNV), and is applied in a variety of marine power generation applications.

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