Navy Reaches for Desired Strength by '08

Friday, February 16, 2007
With the Navy’s Fleet of the future established, and seeing cost-savings platforms being delivered to the Fleet, the Navy announced Feb. 5 the plan to reach an end strength number of 328,4000 for active duty and 67,800 for reserves in 2008, reaching a floor of approximately 322,000 for active duty and 68,000 for reserves in 2013.

“Now that we have future fleet defined – 313 ships and about 3,800 aircraft – we are able to define the work and identify requirements,” said Chief of Naval Personnel Vice Adm. John C. Harvey Jr. “I’m confident that our end strength number is right, and that the number translates to the capabilities we need to do the missions that the nation expects the Navy to do.”

By partnering with the Navy enterprises, there is a much better understanding of the work requirement across platforms and jobs, at sea and ashore. In addition, savings from BRAC decision 10 years ago, and the delivery of manpower saving platforms to the fleet are making a difference in how many Sailors are needed to do the job. As platforms change – retiring older, manpower and maintenance intensive ships and aircraft - requirements for Sailors are changing.

“Our future carriers will have about 1,000 less Sailors required between the ship and airwing to deliver the same capability of today’s carriers,” Harvey said. “In our 313-ship Navy, you have significant changes in platforms themselves that enable downsizing to continue without giving away capability or making a 24-hour workday for the Sailor.”

Even while end strength comes down over the next year until it steadies in 2013, the Navy’s recruiting missions will grow. With natural attrition and retention figures, as well as the need for an increasingly skilled workforce, a strong recruiting helps to shape a stronger Navy of the future.

“We learned a lesson in the 90’s that we cannot lower recruiting when we’re downsizing, because we must pay attention to how we shape the force of the future,” Harvey added. “We had historic re-enlistment rates after 9/11, but that was a retention rate that couldn’t be sustained over the long haul. This is part of sustaining the force. We want to keep the mid-grade petty officer and the right skill sets who really deliver the goods for us at sea, in terms of the blend of the experience, leadership, capability.”

Seeing the end strength go down until 2013 does not mean that there will be large cuts in today’s enlisted force.

“You are going to have a career with us. We may have rating conversions, but nobody is going to lose a career who has the capability to serve, who wants to serve, and who should serve,” Harvey stated.

Maritime Reporter October 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds


Seaspan Acquires Sixth 14000 TEU Boxship

Seaspan Corporation  announced today that it accepted delivery of a 14000 TEU containership, the YM Warmth. The new containership, which was constructed at Hyundai Heavy Industries Co.

Newport News Shipbuilding Converts to Natural Gas

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) announced today that its Newport News Shipbuilding division has converted its steam-generation plant from heavy fuel oil, also known as Bunker C,

French President Inaugurates CMA CGM’s New Mega Ship

The CMA CGM Bougainville, the largest containership sailing under French flag, was inaugurated Tuesday by French President François Hollande in Le Havre.   Other


China Completes lighthouses construction in disputed South China Sea

China has completed the construction of two lighthouses in the disputed South China Sea, the official Xinhua news agency reported, as tensions in the region mount over Beijing's maritime ambitions.

HMS Protector Deployed to Antarctic

Ice ship HMS Protector is heading for waters no Royal Navy vessel has visited in 80 years as she begins a marathon deployment to Antarctica. The Plymouth-based

US Must Exercise Freedom of Navigation in Asia-Pacific -Navy Commander

The commander of U.S. forces in the Pacific said on Friday the United States must carry out freedom of navigation patrols throughout the Asia Pacific, but declined

Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Maritime Standards Navigation Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Repair Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0448 sec (22 req/sec)