Oil Tankers Collide Off England's Isle of Wight

Friday, June 09, 2006
Bloomberg has reported that two oil tankers collided off England's Isle of Wight, the U.K.'s Maritime and Coastguard Agency said. None of the crewmen on the vessels was injured in today's collision and there were no immediate signs of any leakage of fuel into the English Channel, agency spokesman Mark Clark told the British Broadcasting Corp. in an interview aired live. The tankers hit at about 10.15 a.m. local time today, sustaining ``minor damage,'' Clark said. The Coastguard is still checking for any pollution, he added. One of the vessels is registered in Malta, Clark said. Source: Bloomberg
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