Pac Fleet Commander Discusses the LCS

Monday, November 10, 2008

In his latest edition of the "Rat-Pac Report" podcast, posted Nov. 5, Commander, U.S. Pacific Fleet, Adm. Robert F. Willard discussed the importance of the Navy's latest addition to its surface forces, the littoral combat ship (LCS).

"The littoral combat ship is going to bring us a shallow draft ship that's very fast, carries a lot of capacity with a small crew size, that's going to be very, very efficient but also, we think, very, very effective," said Willard. "It's going to contribute what we need in terms of numbers of ships and unique capabilities of ships here in the Pacific Fleet."

Approximately 400 ft long, able to travel at speeds up to 45 knots and capable of operating in water less than 20 feet deep, the LCS has flexible capabilities.

"LCS is a fast, agile and networked surface combatant with a modular, focused mission design providing the combatant commanders with warfighting abilities and operational flexibility," said Capt. Steve Kelly, U.S 3rd Fleet assistant chief of staff for requirements. "The modular aspect of the LCS allows the minimally manned ships to focus on a particular mission, while maximizing the ship's operational availability."

The LCS 1 recently completed its first sea trials and will make its way to its homeport in San Diego.

"We in the Navy are committed to this ship and to what it will bring to expeditionary warfare and littoral environments throughout the Pacific Fleet," said Willard. "I'm excited about the littoral combat ship and what she'll provide."

(Source: Navy News Service)

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