Submarine Returns To Birkenhead Yard

Thursday, July 13, 2000
Cammell Laird, the international marine services company, has been awarded a contract from BAe Systems to support the important maintenance of former Royal Navy submarine, HMS Unseen, for the Royal Canadian Navy.

HMS Unseen is an SSK Upholder diesel-powered conventional submarine built at Birkenhead for the Royal Navy and is one of four conventional submarines that are to be transferred from the Royal Navy to the Royal Canadian Navy over the next few years, the other three vessels being HMS Ursula, HMS Unicorn and HMS Upholder. All four submarines have been mothballed since the mid-nineties following the UK Government's decision to pursue an all-nuclear Submarine policy.

The primary contract was awarded by BAe Systems, which was awarded the contract from both the Royal Navy and Royal Canadian Navy to reactivate, refurbish and modernize all four submarines prior transfer to Canada.

The submarine arrived in Cammell Laird's Merseyside yard on July 4 and is expected to stay in drydock for approximately 40 days prior transferring to the yard's wet basin for a further 15-20 days. During the drydocking period, work will include renewal of the tailshaft bearings as well as a few other repair and refurbishment items required while the vessel is out of the water that have been requested by the Ministry of Defence. She will then undergo trials and crew training at the yard's wet basin prior to sea trials.


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