Court Orders Alaska to Fix Cruise Ship Discharge Permit

Press Release
Friday, August 24, 2012

The Superior Court issued an “Order to Compel” to the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation.

The court order issued to the Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation is for failing to address challenges brought by Campaign to Safeguard America’s Waters and Friends of the Earth to the Cruise Ship Discharge Permit that allows cruise ships to dump their wastewater into Alaska’s waterways.

Earthjustice sued on behalf of CSAW and Friends of the Earth because the permit violated key provisions of the State’s pollution law. CSAW and Friends of the Earth won the case in May, 2011, however, ADEC has failed to fix the significant flaws in the permit for more than fourteen months. The Court is now ordering ADEC to act by August 31.

“The cruise ship discharge permit failed to require the ships to use the 'best available technologies' to reduce the levels of pollutants in their discharges as required by the law or to perform any economic analysis to demonstrate why full compliance shouldn’t be required,” said Gershon Cohen, Project Director of CSAW.

“We brought this case to protect Alaska’s water quality because Alaskans depend on clean water to ensure the health and survival of fishery resources,” said Marcie Keever, oceans and vessels project director at Friends of the Earth. “Thankfully the court has ordered DEC to act after its year-long delay.”

Under this Court order, the State must explain why the permit doesn’t require the use of the best available technologies and determine the economic feasibility of requiring the industry to do a better job to reduce the levels of metals and ammonia in their discharges.


 

Maritime Reporter October 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Legal

Shipbuilding Regulations: Cents and Sensibility

Addressing the Jones Act is just one aspect of an increasingly complicated boatbuilding environment. Stovepiped, poorly conceived regulations is another. The sting of the recession is fading,

How Difficult is it to Obtain a Jones Act Waiver?

The American Salvage Association’s Jon Waldron provides the ultimate cabotage primer. There always seems to be constant chatter about waiving the Jones Act. In reality,

Will Congress Pass Any Maritime Legislation in 2014?

Following its usual summer break over August 2014, Congress came back from its five-week summer recess and spent a whopping eight days or so back in session before recessing once again,

Environmental

What’s All the Noise at IMO?

Shipping may think they hear the sound of new regulations as they are slammed onto their desks.  What is all the noise concerning noise at IMO?  This may very well be the question from ship owners,

Will Congress Pass Any Maritime Legislation in 2014?

Following its usual summer break over August 2014, Congress came back from its five-week summer recess and spent a whopping eight days or so back in session before recessing once again,

ICS Addresses OECD Shipbuilding Working Party

The OECD should be cautious about becoming involved in the question of what constitutes an ‘eco-ship’, the International Chamber of Shipping (ICS) said to governments

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Port Authority Salvage Ship Repair Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0818 sec (12 req/sec)