Ballast Water Violation Double-Talk

The Nautical Institute MARS
Friday, June 07, 2013

A recent incident report by MARS underlines the importance of marking ballast lines & valves clearly (and of being truthful).

A vessel arrived in port to discharge her cargo of chemicals. The same day, the Master was summoned to the Harbourmaster’s office for an alleged violation of the local ballast water regulation. He was somewhat surprised, as the ballasting plan had not been to discharge any ballast – quite the contrary, it was to take on ballast as they discharged cargo. Prior to attending the meeting, the Master asked the OOW if they had carried out deballasting, and the OOW confirmed that they had not.



Once with the Harbour Master the vessel’s Master was shown photographic evidence that clearly showed ballast water being discharged from the ship. Based on this evidence the Master had to acquiesce and issued a statement to the Port Authority that no further violation of local rules would take place.



On returning to the ship, now armed with additional information, the Master again questioned the OOW about deballasting. He was then told that ship staff had inadvertently set up the ballast line and valve setting for deballasting instead of ballasting, and yes, some deballasting had inadvertently taken place. All officers concerned knew it was contrary to local regulations to deballast, as the Master had told them this prior to discharge and it was not a planned manoeuvre in the cargo discharge plan. But an error had been made – yet, the persons involved were reluctant to admit the truth.


Lessons Learned

1 Deballasting in port can have serious administrative consequences if it is not done according to the rules. Although the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships Ballast Water & Sediments (BWM Convention) is not yet in force, coastal states and local ports may have their own ballast regulations that must be followed.

2 Ballast lines and valves should be clearly marked and ballasting processes well documented. Double check all line-ups before pressing ‘pump on’.

3 It is ALWAYS better to come clean with the truth in the first instance rather than weave a web of lies or let the error remain unreported. Reporting errors, close calls or minor incidents is the basis of a strong safety culture. Not reporting has the effect of undermining safety and ‘’doubling-down’’ on any unwanted consequences.

 

Maritime Reporter August 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Legal

Master Fined After Wind Farm Collision

The master of a wind farm support vessel has today been made to pay £3,000 in fines and costs after pleading guilty to breaches of maritime collision regulations.

Polar Code Afoot

The IMO is on the verge of adopting the Polar Code, something that is important and long overdue. The International Maritime Organization (IMO), a specialized agency of the United Nations,

Halliburton to Settle US Gulf Spill Claims for $1.1b

Halliburton Co said it reached a $1.1 billion settlement for a majority of claims against the company for its role in the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010.

Ports

Algeria in Talks to Export Crude to Venezuela

Algeria is in talks to export crude oil to fellow OPEC member Venezuela, Algerian Energy Minister Youcef Yousfi said on Tuesday, confirming a Reuters report. Last week,

New Shipping Agency Enters the Market

Newly formed shipping agency Wave Shipping aims to bring change to current industry practice with its differentiated value proposition Founded by Lars Rosenkrands,

Tankship-specific Version of FindaportCD Released

Harbour & terminal information providers, Shipping Guides Ltd, says its latest tanker-specific  addition enables customers to access the most comprehensive port

Environmental

Ballast Water Leadership

Admiral Paul Zukunft, the new U.S. Coast Guard Commandant, could fill the BWT leadership void. Global efforts to combat the spread of invasive species in ballast

BSEE Conducts Oil Spill Response Equipment Review

Earlier this week, BSEE's Oil Spill Response Division (OSRD) conducted an onsite review of oil spill response equipment listed in DCOR, LLC's Oil Spill Response Plan for platforms offshore Long Beach,

Polar Code Afoot

The IMO is on the verge of adopting the Polar Code, something that is important and long overdue. The International Maritime Organization (IMO), a specialized agency of the United Nations,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Security Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Port Authority Salvage Ship Simulators Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0847 sec (12 req/sec)