New Icebreaker for Russian Arctic

Barents Observer
Wednesday, September 19, 2012
Russian Icebreaker: Image credit Petrobalt

Shipbuilders at Baltiisky Yard starts the construction of Russia’s biggest and most modern diesel-engined icebreaker.

The start of construction was marked by a ceremony at the Baltiiksky Yard in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

According to the ship designers Petrobalt, the vessel will be 146,8 meters long and have a deadweight of 22258 tons. It will have a crew of 38 and will be able to operate autonomously for 60 days in up to two meters thick ice.

The construction contract is worth 7,25 billion RUB, and the ship will be ready by the end of 2015.

The same shipyard had previously won the contract to build Russia's nuclear-powered icebreaker, the LK-60.

The new contracts are of major importance for the yard, which for several years has been on the verge of bankruptcy, reports 'Barents Observer'.

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