New Icebreaker for Russian Arctic

Barents Observer
Wednesday, September 19, 2012
Russian Icebreaker: Image credit Petrobalt

Shipbuilders at Baltiisky Yard starts the construction of Russia’s biggest and most modern diesel-engined icebreaker.

The start of construction was marked by a ceremony at the Baltiiksky Yard in Saint Petersburg, Russia.

According to the ship designers Petrobalt, the vessel will be 146,8 meters long and have a deadweight of 22258 tons. It will have a crew of 38 and will be able to operate autonomously for 60 days in up to two meters thick ice.

The construction contract is worth 7,25 billion RUB, and the ship will be ready by the end of 2015.

The same shipyard had previously won the contract to build Russia's nuclear-powered icebreaker, the LK-60.

The new contracts are of major importance for the yard, which for several years has been on the verge of bankruptcy, reports 'Barents Observer'.

Maritime Reporter October 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Shipbuilding

An Efficient Addition to a Strong Fleet

Cvitanovic towing of Belle Chasse, Louisiana has taken delivery of a fourth vessel for its fleet of highly efficient Lugger-style tugs. Built at the Rodriguez yard in Bayou LaBatre,

Ferus Smit to Launch Newbuild Bulk Carrier

Ferus Smit will launch newbuild general bulk cargo vessel Arklow Brave on Friday, December 12, in Westerbroek.   Arklow Brave is the fifth vessel in a series

Dutch Yards May Need to Rethink Contract Structures

Rotterdam-based law firm AKD said a recent decision of the Dutch courts means that shipyards in The Netherlands may no longer be able to rely on the right to retain

Arctic Operations

Odd Arne Slettebø new CFO of “Noreco”

Norwegian Energy Company ASA has appointed Odd Arne Slettebø as Chief Financial Officer (CFO). Odd Arne Slettebø replaces Tommy Sundt who has been appointed new CEO of the Company.

Environmental Groups: IMO Polar Code Too Weak

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) today adopted the Polar Code aimed at regulating shipping in Polar Regions. Several environmental groups have criticized

IMO Steps Up Safety in Polar Waters

United Nations’ International Maritime Organization (IMO) has adopted global, binding regulations to enhance safety of navigation in polar waters. After several years’ intense negotiations,

 
 
Maritime Contracts Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1226 sec (8 req/sec)