Ferry Collides Head-On with Chemical Tankship Off Indonesia

Jakarta Post
Thursday, September 27, 2012

Rescuers continue to search Indonesian waters for an unkown number of passengers missing from an Indonesian Ro-Pax ferry.

More than 210 passengers and crew were rescued in the hours after the accident by ten 'Good Samaritan' merchant ships, but an unknown number are feared missing. Eight bodies have been recovered so far, and six people have been hospitalized.

The ferry manifest listed 213 passengers and crew and 78 vehicles on the ferry, but manifests are often unreliable in Indonesia because tickets are sold onboard to passengers who are never registered, reports the Jakarta Post.

The other ship involved in the accident, a chemical tankship owned by Singapore-based Norgas Carriers Pte. Ltd., was reportedly not seriously damaged.



Maritime Reporter August 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

CAGTC Members Win Big in TIGER VI

The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) announced Friday that 72 projects will receive a total of $600 million from the sixth round of the Transportation

Ingalls Delivers NSC Hamilton to USCG

Huntington Ingalls Industries' (HII) Ingalls Shipbuilding division delivered the National Security Cutter Hamilton (WMSL 753) to the U.S. Coast Guard today. The

Commissioner Doyle Addresses NCBFAA

Federal Maritime Commissioner William P. Doyle spoke today at the National Customs Brokers & Forwarders Association of America (NCBFAA) Government Affairs Conference in Washington, DC.

News

CAGTC Members Win Big in TIGER VI

The U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) announced Friday that 72 projects will receive a total of $600 million from the sixth round of the Transportation

Seasat Wins Contract from Maersk Supply Services

Seasat A/S, the Danish communications services provider, specialized in delivering reliable broadband, television and voice services for the maritime market announces

Leaky Equipment, Not Fracking, Behind Tainted US Water -Study

The contamination of water supplies near U.S. shale gas fields appears to be the result of leaky cement wells and casings and not the controversial production technique of hydraulic fracturing,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1640 sec (6 req/sec)