Port of LA Breaks Ground on Intermodal Terminal

Press Release
Thursday, January 17, 2013

Port of Los Angeles breaks ground on US$137-million railyard that will increase on-dock rail efficiency, reduce congestion and improve environment.

Los Angeles Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa and Port of Los Angeles officials broke ground on a new intermodal storage railyard that will improve a vital link in the national freight network. The new yard will function as a critical link between the Port of Los Angeles and the Alameda Corridor, providing staging and storage for trains using the corridor.

Construction of the $137.7 million rail project at Berth 200, also known as the West Basin Railyard, will generate about 2,000 direct and indirect jobs. When completed, the new yard will move cargo more safely and efficiently, reduce truck traffic on roads and freeways and improve regional air quality while strengthening the Port of Los Angeles’ position as the nation’s No. 1 trade gateway.

The Berth 200 railyard project also enables track space at the TraPac container terminal to serve as TraPac’s future on-dock rail facility. With completion of the $365 million in rail, roadway and terminal improvements at TraPac over the next three years, TraPac will join the other seven container terminals at the Port of Los Angeles that offer shippers the speed-to-market advantage of on-dock rail.

“This project creates jobs, reduces pollution and makes our city a better place to live, work and do business,” said Mayor Villaraigosa. “The economic and environmental benefits of this investment will be felt across the nation.”

The project will be built in two phases. Phase I includes construction of the new yard, support tracks for the TraPac and China Shipping/West Basin Container terminals, double-track connections to the Alameda Corridor and national rail network, and access road improvements. Phase II is due to begin construction later in 2013 and includes final rail network connections and vehicle overpasses to eliminate at-grade crossings for safer, more efficient flow of truck and commuter traffic. Both phases are due to be completed in summer 2014.
 

Maritime Reporter August 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Contracts

Brent Crude Slips Towards US$102

Brent crude fell towards $102 a barrel on Tuesday on concerns of slowing oil demand growth due to weak economic recoveries in China and Europe, although new unrest

New Superyacht ROCKIT.IT Launched by Feadship

Feadship says it has launched the outstanding 60.35-metre motoryacht ROCK.IT. Created for an experienced owner who has chartered Feadships and appreciated the essence of the brand,

FTA Approves WSF Ferry Terminal Plans

In the latest Washington State Ferries Weekly Update, Capt. George A. Capacci, Interim Assistant Secretary WSDOT/Ferries Division briefs as follows: "FTA approves

Ports

Tankship-specific Version of FindaportCD Released

Harbour & terminal information providers, Shipping Guides Ltd, says its latest tanker-specific  addition enables customers to access the most comprehensive port

Panama Canal Generates VER Carbon Credits

The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) informs it has certified Verified Emission Reductions (VERs) or carbon credits, within the framework of the Sustainable Forest

NZ's Lyttelton Port Recommends Offer, to Pay Special Dividend

The board of New Zealand's  Lyttelton Port Co. Ltd recommended minority shareholders accept an offer of NZ$3.95 a share offer from the commercial arm of the Christchurch city council.

Intermodal

No Sign of Ultra-Large Containership Mega Hubs: Analysis

Contrary to the views of some in the industry, Ultra Large Container Vessels are continuing to call at multiple North European ports per loop and are not concentrating on a mega-hub,

Dentressangle Acquire U.S. 3PL Provider Jacobson

France's Norbert Dentressangle says it has completed the previously announced acquisition of all the shares of privately held U.S. third party logistics (3PL) provider,

US Rail Jams Force Rush to Roads and Rivers

U.S. coal-burning power utilities are being forced to turn to barges and more expensive trucks to move coal, desperate to shore up stockpiles left dangerously low

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Repair Ship Simulators Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1213 sec (8 req/sec)