Coast Guard Medevacs 19 Crew from Cargo Ship

By George Backwell
Thursday, July 03, 2014
Medevac by helicopter: Photo USCG

Nineteen sick crew-members, thought to be suffering from food poisoning aboard the 584-foot cargo ship 'JS Comet' have been hoisted from their anchored vessel 3 miles off Port Canaveral, Florida.

USCG informs that two MH-60 helicopter crews from Coast Guard Air Station Clearwater safely hoisted the crewmembers from the vessel in 35 knot winds and five to 6-foot seas associated with Tropical Storm Arthur. Due to deteriorating weather conditions and the crew’s symptoms worsening, the Coast Guard determined the safest course of action was to evacuate the patients via helicopter rather than a Coast Guard smallboat.

The JS Comet crew became ill early Tuesday reportedly suffering food poisoning like symptoms, and following consultation with the Center for Disease Control and a Coast Guard flight surgeon and other medical professionals, the decision was made to transport the 19 crewmembers to a local area hospital.

Two crewmembers from the JS Comet not experiencing illness remain aboard the vessel which is under a Captain of the Port Order, which prohibits the 584-foot South Korean-flagged cargo ship to enter any U.S. port of call until the following conditions are met.

Under the authority of Ports and Waterways Safety Act, the motor vessel JS Comet is prohibited to enter any port and remain at anchor outside of Port Canaveral until the following conditions are met:
•The U.S. Coast Guard determines the nature of the illness and the expected duration.
•Vessel shall have a minimum of three harbor safety tugs immediately available to assist in the event that the vessel starts to drag anchor.
•Provide credential mariners to assist in anchor watch to include at least one navigational officer, one deckhand or able seaman and one engineer.
•Maintain an hourly communication schedule with Sector Jacksonville command center to report position, crew status and any other safety concerns via VHF radio.
•Vessel minimum safe manning requirements are adequately satisfied to ensure the safe operation of the vessel when it has been cleared to depart.

“The health and well-being of the ill crewmembers was our top priority,” said Capt. Tom Allan, commanding officer and captain of the port for Coast Guard Sector Jacksonville. “Our responders performed extraordinarily in challenging conditions to get the sick crewmembers to the hospital. We are coordinating with the company to identify qualified personnel to operate the vessel, mitigate the maritime environmental risks and ensure the public’s safety.”

 

Maritime Reporter November 2014 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Madsen to Chair Norway’s Research Council Executive Board

Henrik O. Madsen appointed chairman of the executive board of the Research Council of Norway   DNV GL president and CEO Henrik O. Madsen was appointed as chairman

Port of Houston Expecting Record Year

The Port of Houston Authority is expecting 2014 to close as a banner year for the port, with 34 million tons of cargo handled through November, Executive Director

Hapag-Lloyd Completes CSAV Merger Capital Increase

Hapag-Lloyd completed the planned capital increase of EUR 370 million (approximately $452.5 million) as part of the business combination with the Chilean shipping

Legal

US Plans to Shut Royalty Loophole on Coal Exports

U.S. coal companies will no longer be able to settle royalties at low domestic prices when they make lucrative sales to Asia according to reforms proposed by the Interior Department on Friday.

Denmark Issues New Pilotage Regulations

In an effort to make the pilotage market more efficient, the Danish Maritime Authority (DMA) issued several new regulations following on amendments to the pilotage act.

US Shippers, West Coast Dockworkers Union Resume Contract Talks

Negotiators for shipping lines and terminal operators at 29 U.S. West Coast ports resumed contract talks with the union for dockworkers on Thursday, as cargo backups continued at the ports,

Coast Guard

USCG on Cuba Policy Changes

The U.S. Coast Guard missions and operations in the Southeast remain unchanged. The Coast Guard strongly discourages attempts to illegally enter the country by taking to the sea.

USCG Says Unaffected by Cuba Policy Changes

The U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) issued a statement today stating that the United States’ Cuba policy change will not impact its missions annd operations. “Coast Guard

Italian Shipbuilder Pleads Guilty to Environmental Crimes

An Italian shipping firm based in Genoa, Italy, pleaded guilty to violating the Act to Prevent Pollution from Ships by falsifying required ships’ documents to hide

Maritime Safety

NZ Report: Human Error to Blame for Rena Grounding

New Zealand's Transport Accident Investigation Commission (TAIC) published its final report into the grounding of containership Rena in October 2011. The TAIC’s

DNV GL Targets Safer Approach to Subsea Lifting

The completion of a joint industry project (JIP) to improve existing standards and regulations around subsea lifting operations has resulted in a new recommended practice (RP).

NOAA: US to See More Floods from Sea Level Rise

Most of U.S. coast may see 30 or more days a year of floods up to 2 feet above high tides. By 2050, a majority of U.S. coastal areas are likely to be threatened

 
 
Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2369 sec (4 req/sec)