Save Oceans, Feed the World

Press Release
Friday, June 08, 2012

On World Ocean Day (8, June) Oceana reports that saving the world's oceans can help feed a 9 billion population in 2050

The report explains how implementing science-based fisheries management in the 25 countries that control more than 75% of the world's fish stocks - specifically measures that reduce overfishing, protect habitat and limit bycatch - will increase fish stocks to the point that wild seafood could sustainably feed 700 million people a day. Putting in place these policies in the countries that control most of the world's marine fish catch will also help protect important ocean ecosystems.

According to projections by the United Nations, there will be 9 billion people on earth by 2050, a 30 percent increase in the world's population. The UN also estimates that food production will need to increase even further, by 70 percent, to meet a forecasted increased demand for food. This dramatic growth in people and demand for food is, unfortunately, occurring when the terrestrial resources - arable land and fresh water - needed for food production are becoming increasingly scarce.

Because the majority of the world's marine fish are caught in the national waters of only 25 countries, policy solutions that protect wild fish stocks can be applied on a country-by-country basis - without requiring action by more complicated international bodies or laws. These same 25 countries are also home to over half the world's people suffering from hunger.

Case studies show science-based management of fish stocks can allow fish stocks to rebound. If this type of science-based management is implemented in the top 25 countries, Oceana believes the result can be an increase in global fish stocks, making wild fish more accessible to artisanal fishermen and hungry people around the world while also providing protection for important ocean ecosystems, habitats and biodiversity.


 



 


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