Career Glance: Starting off on water as a deckhand

Joseph Keefe
Wednesday, January 08, 2014
José Tamayo takes care of operations on the deck of the Galveston Island Ferry. Photo credit: Jeannie Peng-Armao

When José Tamayo and Calvin Aubry step foot onto the deck of the Galveston Island Ferry, they can be in for a long day as deckhands. But as they both see it, what's better than a day out on the water?


The deckhand is the first position for a person vying for a chance to work in the maritime industry. It is a position that opens doors as mariners continue to obtain their U.S. Coast Guard (USCG) certifications. As keeper of the deck, deckhands are usually in charge of some maintenance duties, loading and unloading, and keeping the deck in order. They can start making anywhere from $130 to $170 a day, depending on inland or near coastal service. For deckhands who work on the Galveston Island Ferry, the job allows them the ability to return home each evening after working eight-hour shifts.        
 

"What I enjoy about this job is that I get to see a lot of people, work outside and on the water," said Aubry, who has obtained five certifications through training at the San Jacinto College maritime program. "I was willing to start work at the bottom and am taking the necessary steps to move up the career ladder.”
 

Aubry has completed USCG-approved certification courses in lifeboat operations, CPR, first aid, and firefighting at San Jacinto College. Tamayo, a fellow deckhand, said the endorsements and certifications are what move a person up in his or her job. "There is a lot of room for advancements. It didn't take me long to advancement from a level 3 deckhand to a level 1," said Tamayo, who has worked on the ferry since 1990. "And the pay increases as you receive more certifications. It's a great job." Both Tamayo and Aubry plan to move up to able-bodied seaman in the coming years. After advancing, they'll continue to train for positions as mate and then captain.

 

The San Jacinto College maritime program is located at the San Jacinto College Maritime and Technical Training Center in Pasadena, Texas, and offers USCG-approved courses for mariners to begin their careers and maintain their updated certifications. Since May 2010, the program has awarded approximately 2,000 USCG certifications and has recently acquired three interactive bridge simulators for professional mariner training thanks to a collaborative agreement with the Houston Pilots.
 

In addition to the mariner certification training, the College also offers an Associate of Applied Science in Maritime Technology – for students interested in working on a vessel in an operations capacity; a Ships and shipping course and articulation agreement with Texas A&M University at Galveston for the Bachelor of Science degree in Maritime Administration; and an Associate of Applied Science in International Business, Maritime and Logistics- for students interested in pursuing careers in the international business arena of logistics and supply chain management. Graduates also have the option of transferring to the Maritime Transportation Management and Security program at Texas Southern University, or to the University of Houston – College of Technology to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Logistics and Supply Chain Management.


Currently, the San Jacinto College is developing a new maritime facility on 13 acres along the Port of Houston that will increase the number of USCG approved courses available and that will house simulation training labs.

Maritime Reporter January 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Transas: The Bridge to Tomorrow

Transas was founded in 1990, by a group of former navigators and engineers, who at that time envisioned ways in which computers could revolutionize maritime safety, communications and security.

ZF Celebrating 100th Anniversary

2015 marks the 100th anniversary of the foundation of ZF Friedrichshafen AG   Zahnradfabrik GmbH was founded in 1915, and through a 100-year history has developed

Signal Ship Repair Achieves OSHA Milestone

Signal International announced that on December 31, 2014, the Signal Ship Repair Operations located in Mobile, Alabama achieved one full year and worked 387,926 manhours,

News

Shepler’s New Ferry Takes Shape

Sparks are flying on the bulkhead and engine room of the $3.8 million, 85-foot Miss Margy, the newest addition to the Shepler’s Mackinac Island Ferry fleet, at Moran Iron Works.

LEEVAC Launches First PSV for Tidewater

On Tuesday, January 27, LEEVAC Shipyards Jennings, LLC launched hull 367, a platform supply vessel (PSV) designed by LEEVAC Design Services, LLC (300 DE-52 HAB PSV).

Puget Sound Container Volumes Flat in 2014

Container volumes through Puget Sound’s largest container ports remained flat in 2014, according to numbers released jointly for the first time by the ports of Seattle and Tacoma.

Maritime Safety

Next Generation Bridge Concept

Rolls-Royce, VTT team on new Ship Intelligence Vison   For decades the maritime industry has long-theorized of emulating the “airline model” in uniformity and

Transas: The Bridge to Tomorrow

Transas was founded in 1990, by a group of former navigators and engineers, who at that time envisioned ways in which computers could revolutionize maritime safety, communications and security.

BICERA Explosion Relief Valve

Sometimes it seems cliché to repeat that a product or system “protects equipment and saves lives,” but in the case of valve manufacturer Penn-Troy, which recently

Ferries

Shepler’s New Ferry Takes Shape

Sparks are flying on the bulkhead and engine room of the $3.8 million, 85-foot Miss Margy, the newest addition to the Shepler’s Mackinac Island Ferry fleet, at Moran Iron Works.

Xunlong Shenzhen Orders Dutch-designed Ferry

CoCo Yachts B.V. inks contract with Xunlong Shenzhen Ferry Company for one Coastal Cruiser 300 Xunlong Shenzhen Ferry Company has ordered a Coastal Cruiser 300 ferry from CoCo Yachts,

Whale Carcass Washes Up Under Seattle Ferry Dock

A dead gray whale has floated underneath a busy commuter ferry terminal in downtown Seattle, sending a putrid odor wafting onto the dock and diverting some passenger ferries to another slip,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Navigation Pod Propulsion Port Authority Ship Repair Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.3603 sec (3 req/sec)