Naming Ceremony For Seven Havila Held In Stavanger

Friday, March 18, 2011

Subsea 7, a leading seabed-to-surface engineering and construction services contractor, Havila Shipping and Havyard Design & Engineering held an official naming ceremony for the new-build diving support vessel, Seven Havila, in Stavanger on Thursday 17 March 2011.

The vessel, one of the most sophisticated of its kind, is 120 metres long with 1050 m2 of deck space and is capable of travelling at a fast transit speed of 17 knots. Owned through a Joint Venture with Havyard Shipping and Subsea 7, she is a DP Class III vessel, equipped with fully computerised diving systems  and a 250 tonnes heave-compensated main offshore crane.

Designed by Havyard Design and Engineering, Norway and built by Havyard Ship Technology (previously Havyard Leirvik), the ship is capable of high speed transit, is classed for operations in ice and is fully NORSOK compliant.  Accommodating a crew of 120, the vessel will operate with up to 24 divers.

Stuart Fitzgerald, Subsea 7’s Vice President – Norway, said: “This is an exciting day for all concerned and is the culmination of a close co-operation with the owner, designers and the shipyard to create this state-of-the-art vessel. The addition of Seven Havila continues our fleet rejuvenation programme and adds an industry-leading asset to our operations in Northern Europe. This key asset will assist us in winning challenging projects and work from a vessel which will differentiate Subsea 7 from its competitors in terms of safety, efficiency and productivity.”

Geir Johan Bakke, Havyard Group’s President & CEO, said: “We are very proud to have taken part in creating this fantastic and beautiful vessel. It's been an exciting and challenging process. We’ve learned a lot from cooperating with owners and key suppliers in the process of developing the vessel, and at the same time added value through our employees’ knowledge of ship technology. This cooperation has taken Havyard Group to another level making us even more capable of designing and building the most advanced offshore support vessels in the future.”

Njål Sævik, Havila Shipping’s CEO, said: “Havila Shipping’s goal is to be the leading provider of quality assured supply services to offshore companies. We have a top, modern fleet of platform supply vessels, anchor handlers and subsea vessels. Seven Havila is the new flag ship in our fleet and we are glad to have taken delivery of this vessel together with Subsea 7.  We are looking forward to see her performing to the satisfaction of our customers in the years to come.”
 

Source: Subsea 7

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