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Guascor Engines Make Serious Inroads

Guascor Inc, a manufacturer of diesel and gas engines, power systems and marine reduction gears based in Northern Spain and distributed throughout the Southeastern United States by Reagan Equipment Company, Inc. has accumulated a number of interesting references in the past six months, installations that should go a long way in extending the brand to users throughout the country. For the Louisiana Department of Transportation's Ferry Division, Guascor supplied a pair of SF 180 TAs for the repower and repair of the 30-year-old ferryboat, M/V Acadia. M/V Acadia has a busy work life, crossing the Mississippi River at State Route 75 in Plaquemine, LA, every half-hour, 16 hours a day, seven days a week carrying up to 35 cars per trip. Last summer it was decided to repower the boat, and Leevac Industries and Reagan Equipment Company Inc., Marine Division in Plaquemine, LA, was chosen for the task. The six-cylinder in-line SF 180TA diesels are rated at 581 hp at 1,800 rpm. The ferry was re-delivered to the State of Louisiana in October 2002. Another interesting challenge for the Guascor power products was the repowering of Lebeouf Bros. Towing's M/V Creole Pass, a 39-year-old twin-screw towboat, which needed to come in under new environmental emission guidelines. Chosen for this task was a pair of SF240 TAs, engines rated 750 hp at 1,800 rpm. The 66 x 22 ft. boat with an eight-ft


Precious Cargo Returns to S. Florida

The 686-foot Yacht Express in Martinique.

Every October at Port Everglades, one of the most active cargo ports in the United States, Dockwise Yacht Transport (DYT) reminds the world that its semi-submersible ships are among the most extraordinary in the world, and the cargo they carry is as precious as any delivered around the globe by the thousands of ships that pass through there.    This year, not one but two Dockwise ships, the 686-foot (209-meter) Yacht Express and the smaller 555.93-foot (169


Gulf Firms Moving Cargo, Staff To Distant Rigs

SEACOR Cheetah,170-foot catamaran delivered by Gulf Craft in March 2008.

More than a decade ago, deepwater oil production in the Gulf of Mexico surpassed shallow water output for the first time ever. These days, rigs are found hundreds of miles offshore. Companies need to get equipment, employees, fuel and mud to those sites economically and usually on a tight schedule. Gulf marine companies are trying to meet those requirements by increasing the speed, size and energy efficiency of their vessels--though not necessarily all at once.  


Vessels: Tall Stacks Draws 800,000 to Queen City

By Larry Pearson Every four years the excursion vessel segment of the commercial marine industry stages one of the largest festivals in the United States, yet except for the vessels that participate in it, little is known about this event. It overshadows the Workboat Show but receives little attention in the marine press. From an attendance standpoint, if this event were the World Series of Baseball, the Workboat Show would be T-ball for five-year olds


 
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