Marine Link
Tuesday, October 25, 2016

Canada Funds Shortsea Shipping Study

July 6, 2005

Mr. Geoff Regan, Minister of Fisheries and Oceans announced, on behalf of Transport Minister Jean-C. Lapierre, that Transport Canada will provide close to $26,000 in funding for a study on shortsea shipping on the east coast of North America to be conducted by the Faculty of Management of Dalhousie University.

Shortsea shipping refers to the movement of cargo and passengers by water along coastlines, to and from nearby islands, or within lakes and river systems, but without crossing an ocean. Increased use of shortsea shipping could also help ease freight transportation congestion and improve air quality.

“This study will assist government and industry in realizing shortsea shipping’s potential by shedding light on the challenges that affect it,” said Mr. Regan. “Studies such as these are important in order for industry to compete effectively.”

“This project will highlight how effective current government policies are at resolving the shortsea shipping industry’s challenges and help determine if they could be improved,” said Mr. Lapierre. “Funding of these initiatives furthers the sustainability, efficiency and integration of transportation systems in Canada.”

The purpose of the study is to examine the potential for shortsea shipping activities on the east coast of Canada and the United States by developing insights into current and future freight flows along the Atlantic Coast. It will also review the combination of modes by which goods are currently transported. Partners in the study – which will cost close to $52,000 – include: Dalhousie University, which will be contributing close to $11,000; the Halifax Port Authority, which will contribute $15,000; and Transport Canada. The Port of Halifax is an expanding hub for domestic and international intermodal cargoes.

Funding for this project comes from the Transportation Planning and Modal Integration Initiative, part of the Government of Canada’s $600 million Strategic Highway Infrastructure Program. This program, which was announced on April 3, 2001, has two main components: a $500 million highway construction component and a $100 million national system integration component. From the integration component, $5 million is available for academic research studies or applied transportation initiatives that advance transportation planning and modal integration in urban areas and along transportation corridors.

Funding for this initiative was provided from the existing financial framework.

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