Navy Plans Call for 51 New Ships by 2011

Thursday, January 12, 2006
A draft of the Navy's five-year construction program calls for the continued building of one Virginia-class submarine a year, despite pressure from Connecticut's congressional delegation to boost production to at least two subs annually. The draft report calls for an overall $69 billion construction budget for the Navy through fiscal year 2011, including nearly $16 billion for five new subs, which are being jointly built by the Groton-based Electric Boat shipyard and the Northrop Grumman Newport News yard in Virginia. In addition, the draft report reportedly calls for a total of 51 new ships during the five-year timeframe, including a new aircraft carrier, new DD(X) destroyers and littoral combat ships for close-to-shore operations and the additional Virginia-class subs. The 10-boat Virginia class of submarines is the successor to the much smaller Seawolf class, which only produced three submarines. The Virginia class was developed to be less expensive than the Seawolf and was built to handle post-Cold War sub missions, including special operations and surveillance. The 560-foot-long boats are larger than the Los Angeles-class submarines and have a price tag of about $2.4 billion each. The Navy has remained firm on backing its one-boat production rate through the end of fiscal year 2011, although earlier plans had called for a two-boat production rate starting in fiscal year 2009. The federal fiscal year runs from Oct. 1 to Sept. 30. This past December, congressional insiders said they expected the Navy to maintain a future fleet of 313 ships, which would include 48 submarines. The current 288-ship fleet is about half the size it was three decades ago. (Source: www.theday.com)

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter July 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Navy

This Day In Naval History - July 29

1846 - During the Mexican-American War, a detachment of Marines and Sailors, led by Arm. Col. John C. Fremont from the sloop USS Cyane, commanded by Cmdr. Samuel F.

Det Norske to Restore Production at Alvheim after Leak

Norwegian oil firm Det norske said it expected to reach full production at its Alvheim FPSO (floating storage, offloading and producing unit) overnight after a leak,

This Day In Naval History: July 28

1861 - During the Civil War, the frigate, USS St. Lawrence, spots a schooner flying English colors and gave chase. Some four hours later, as she is overhauling the schooner,

Coast Guard

Safety and Preparation on the Brownwater Radar

Weather Channel Forecasters are predicting a “near-average” hurricane season for 2016, but warn that an average season does not mean businesses and residents shouldn’t prepare for the worst.

Alaska Juris Sinks, 46 People Rescued

The Fishing Company of Alaska, based in Renton, owns the  238-foot  Alaska Juris that started sinking in the Bering Sea shortly before noon on Tuesday, says a report in Seattle Times.

Sunken Barge Impedes Waterway Traffic Near Galveston

A barge sank east of the Galveston Causeway railroad bridge Tuesday, causing the U.S. Coast Guard to issue a safety zone and temporarily restrict traffic on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0897 sec (11 req/sec)