Five Panamax Ships Transit Gatun Locks

Friday, September 03, 2004
The Panama Canal Authority (ACP) said that five “extreme-sized” panamax ships (more than 900´ in overall length) transited successively through the waterway’s Gatun Locks on August 26, 2004. This accomplishment marks the first time that five of these panamax vessels have transited Gatun Locks consecutively going southbound, toward the Pacific Ocean.

Eight locomotives and 16 wires were used to move the vessels through the Locks. Normally, six locomotives and 12 wires are used to accommodate regular panamax vessels. Total transit time for all of these ships to pass through Gatun Locks was estimated at five hours.

“The Canal’s achievement today is a testament to the tireless effort of our employees and their commitment to a more efficient, reliable and safe Canal. We are reaping the benefits from the investments made in the Canal’s permanent modernization program. Our purpose remains firm – to provide the best service for all of our customers,” said Administrator Alberto Alemán Zubieta.

Last year, the ACP purchased 34 new locomotives from the Mitsubishi Corporation as part of the Canal’s permanent modernization program. The ACP has been upgrading its locomotive fleet in a multi-year contract with Mitsubishi for the past several years. The contract entitled the ACP to exercise the unique option of assembling 16 of the 34 locomotives in Panama by ACP employees, with Mitsubishi supervision of the first two. Rarely done by Mitsubishi, the assembly in Panama provided ACP employees with a transfer of skills, as well as opportunities for training and technology education.

The Canal will also continue to replace the locomotive tow tracks at Gatun Locks through 2005. The tow track replacement will improve the Canal’s operations and will continually increase efficiency and capacity, thus contributing to maintain good Canal Waters Time (the time it takes a vessel to transit the Canal including time waiting for passage), even with the increase in traffic and tonnage that the Canal has experienced recently.

Maritime Reporter February 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Navigation

Containership Becomes Largest to Sail the Thames

The Munkebo Maersk became the largest ship to ever sail up the River Thames as it called at DP World London Gateway, the U.K.’s newest deep-sea port hub. The 399-meter-long,

Futuristic Bridge Concept by Rolls-Royce

In 2013 alone, Rolls-Royce invested £1.1 billion on research and development while at the same time supporting a global network of 31 University Technology Centers,

ExxonMobil Encouraging Girls into Engineering

ExxonMobil is encouraging girls to consider science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) careers through the '12th-annual Introduce a Girl to Engineering

Environmental

Britain Should Appoint Ambassador to the Arctic

The House of Lords Arctic Committee urged that UK should follow the example set by France, Singapore and Japan and appoint an Ambassador for the Arctic.   The

RoRo Ship Enters Operation for WWL

Wallenius Wilhelmsen Logistics welcomes into operation the M/V Thermopylae, the first of its new generation of Post Panamax HERO (High Efficiency RoRo) PCTC vessels.

Maersk Publishes Sustainability Report

Having launched a new sustainability strategy last year, the Maersk Group has published its 2014 sustainability report, covering aspects of the group’s 2014 sustainability

 
 
Maritime Security Naval Architecture Offshore Oil Pipelines Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Sonar
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | terms and conditions | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1221 sec (8 req/sec)