Panama Canal Implements New Vessel Tracking System

Thursday, March 04, 2004
Beginning April 1, 2004, and to be fully implemented on July 1, 2004, the Panama Canal Authority (ACP) will begin using a new system to send and receive data to and from vessels planning to transit the Canal. Called the Automated Data Collection System (ADCS), the new system will eliminate the current process of data collection via paper, substituting it with an electronic exchange of information between the ACP and its customers. Vessels transiting the Canal will be required to report all necessary data 96 hours before arrival. To comply with the new security requirements included in the International Ship and Port Facility Security Code (ISPS), the ADCS will improve and facilitate the process of data submission needed for risk assessments and transit operations. The ADCS should save time, lessen human error and reduce delays. The ADCS is one of the many projects within the permanent modernization program that the ACP is currently implementing to enhance the efficiency and reliability of the Canal, while ensuring the safety of its customers.
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