North Atlantic Right Whale Management Measures

Wednesday, June 05, 2002
In August 2001, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) proposed ship traffic management measures as a means of reducing the incidence of ship strikes and resulting fatalities of the North Atlantic Right Whale. There are approximately 350 surviving Right Whales, and they are considered to be the most endangered of the large mammals. Through federal regulation, the NMFS implemented a "mandatory ship reporting system" to increase the industry's awareness of the problem and encourage the coastal shipping community to take actions to reduce Right Whale fatalities. At the insistence of the shipping community and several ports along the Atlantic Coast, NMFS contracted for a report on the cost of such management measures to the shipping industry. The final report provides an economic analysis of the effects on shipping along the U.S. East Coast from Penobscot River, Maine to Port Canaveral, Florida. The report assumes a 10-knot speed limit imposed on vessel traffic into and out of most ports for a distance of 25 nautical miles during the annual migration "season" of 60 days. Some ports would face additional constraints for up to 120 days due to the "critical habitat sites" for the Right Whale. The average estimated cost of the management measures for large ports are $1.3 million annually and $300,000 annually for smaller ports. Based on these estimates, the cost of the ship strike management measures to vessel operators along the East Coast -- including tugs and barges -- would total between $10 - $16 million annually. The analysis relied on vessel traffic data from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Waterborne Commerce of the United States (1999) and specific port call information provided by individual port authorities. The report outlines vessel traffic for dry bulk carriers, tankships, container vessels and tug and barge units. NMFS and the shipping community need to review and approve the report prior to the promulgation of regulations for the implementation of management measures. Source: AWO Letter

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter June 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Conrad Shipyard Forms LNG Business Unit

Conrad Shipyard has formed a new business unit focused on LNG projects.   Conrad, builder of North America’s first LNG bunker barge scheduled for 2017 delivery,

Prince Charles Places Final Section of UK Aircraft Carrier

The second of the largest warships ever built for the U.K. Royal Navy, the Queen Elizabeth Class carrier HMS Prince of Wales, was given the royal seal of approval when HRH The Prince of Wales,

New Zealand: Maritime Trade is Key

Globally, shipping is on the rise – already 80-90 percent of the world’s trade is by ship; that is more than 12 billion metric tons of goods annually, shipped by 1.

Environmental

MISC Publishes its 2015 Sustainability Report

MISC Berhad (MISC) today announces the publication of its 2015 Sustainability Report, covering the Company’s commitment, strategy and performance for the year ended

Admiral of the Ocean Sea Award Recipients Named

The United Seamen's Service (USS) 2016 Admiral of the Ocean Sea Awards (AOTOS) will be presented to Arthur E. Imperatore, Founder and President of New York Waterways; Donald Marcus,

Orca Energy ESS to Power Fish Farm Support Vessel

Grovfjord Mek. Verksted AS (GMV) has selected Corvus Energy as the supplier of the lithium ion based energy storage system (ESS) for a fish farm support vessel called GMV ZERO.

 
 
Maritime Security Navigation Offshore Oil Pipelines Salvage Ship Electronics Ship Repair Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0030 sec (337 req/sec)