Russian Research Vessel Looks For Answers In Kursk Saga

Monday, September 25, 2000
A Russian research vessel was on its way to the site where Russia's nuclear submarine Kursk sank last month to investigate the extent of the damage, naval officials were quoted as saying on Saturday.

Itar-Tass news agency quoted the Northern Fleet, as saying the Mstislav Keldysh, which once filmed the wreck of the Titanic, would refuel on the Arctic coast near Murmansk and sail to the spot in the Barents Sea where the nuclear-powered Kursk plunged to the bottom.

The ship has two deep-water submersibles. It would film the wreck as part of preparations to recover the remains of the Kursk's 118 crew.

The Kursk sank with all crew onboard on August 12 and is lying 354 ft. (108 m) below the surface. Russia has said the Kursk sank after a collision with a foreign vessel. But many experts outside Russia say the submarine probably sank after one or more explosions on board, possibly caused by a defective torpedo.

President Vladimir Putin last week gave his approval for operations to recover the Kursk's crew to begin and a senior official said work would probably begin next month.

But Russia has so far failed to strike a deal with the Norwegian company whose divers confirmed the sailors were dead after days of fruitless rescue efforts by the Russian navy.

Newspaper Nezavisimaya Gazeta said officials from the Stolt Offshore company had met representatives of the Rubin design bureau in St. Petersburg on Friday but had disagreed over the cost of the operation.

The newspaper said Stolt had said it would cost $20-25 million while the Russians were only offering $5-7 million.

Maritime Reporter April 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

Workboats

Apply Now for the MN 100

The August 2015 edition of Marine News, the leading voice in the North American workboat market, will feature 100 leaders and innovators, including workboat owners and operators,

Boatbuilding in China

While much of the focus on coverage of the Chinese shipbuilding industry is on big shipbuilding, Maritime Reporter switches gears this month to explore activities in select boatbuilding sectors.

Ingram Barge’s Sehrt Elected AWO Chairman

The members of the American Waterways Operators (AWO), the national trade association representing the tugboat, towboat and barge industry, elected a new slate

Navy

BIMCO Welcomes EU Decision on Migrants

BIMCO has stated today that it appreciates the new efforts by EU leaders to reduce increasing reliance on merchant shipping to rescue the growing numbers of

HMS Prince of Wales Bridge Sets Sail

The bridge section of the second Queen Elizabeth Class aircraft carrier set sail today from Glasgow on its first sea voyage to Rosyth.   Upper Block 07 is where

The German Shipbuilding Rebound

German shipbuilding has made a significant turnaround. The country’s shipbuilding industry has seen increases in the number of employees, orders and deliveries compared to 2013,

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Navigation Pipelines Port Authority Ship Repair Ship Simulators Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.1079 sec (9 req/sec)