Shipyard Eyes Tighter Security

Thursday, April 05, 2007
The Portsmouth Naval Shipyard plans to beef up security and wants more authority in dealing with suspicious activities in the waters surrounding the yard, but apparently will stop short of requiring the removal of Kittery docks and moorings to accomplish the goal reported Seacoast Online. The shipyard officials were not clear as to how wide a security zone they would seek around the base in the water but suggested that it might be 10, 50 or 100 feet. Hall said that the Navy had not offered an explanation for the timing of this initiative. The proposed changes will be discussed at the Kittery Port Authority meeting. Source: Seacoast online

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