Hawaii Shark Attacks: 'Shark Shield' Should Prevent Them

MarineLink.com
Thursday, September 05, 2013
Image courtesy of Shark Shield

Surfers, kite surfers, swimmers, snorkelers — they've all suffered attacks by sharks in Hawaii this year, but Shark Shield , the Australian manufacturer of a patented shark deterrent, believes attacks could have been avoided if its electrical shark deterrent, the Shark Shield FREEDOM7, had been worn.

The company’s electrical shark deterrent is the result of more than 20 years of scientific research by some of the world’s leading experts in sharks including the KwaZulu-Natal Shark Board of South Africa.

The result of these two decades of research and development is the Shark Shield FREEDOM7 , the only scientific proven and independently tested electrical shark deterrent designed to reduce the risk of an unwanted shark encounter.

In 2012, scientists from SARDI (South Australian Research Institute) released detailed research where they conducted 116 static bait trials on the Shark Shield FREEDOM7 near the Neptune Islands of South Australia and 189 dynamic trials using seal decoy tows near Seal Island, South Africa.

In the static test, the product significantly increased the time for sharks to take the bait. Once the device was activated, observers noticed a decrease in interactions within two meters. Throughout the seal decoy tow tests, there were no breaches and only two at-surface interactions when the device was turned on. With the device turned off, there were 16 breaches and 27 surface interactions.

Amanda Wilson, Managing Director of Shark Shield, says the deterrent works on the principle that all chondrichthyes — sharks, rays, skates and chimeras — possess ampullary receptors in their heads which are used to find food, communicate and find a mate. These receptors are tuned to low-frequency fields but they only operate when in close proximity with food — or a diver.

“Strapped to the ankle of a swimmer or diver, the Shark Shield emits an electromagnetic field between two electrodes that disturbs these receptors with what has been described as a lightning fast pain of whale-like proportions,” says Amanda, adding that there are no known long-term adverse effects to the shark from the electrical field, but the discomfort is enough for it to deter a shark from approaching a swimmer or diver.
 

Maritime Today


The Maritime Industry's original and most viewed E-News Service

Maritime Reporter May 2016 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

Glosten Promotes Lamkin to Senior Marine Consultant

Seattle-based naval architecture and marine engineering consultancy Glosten has promoted Bradley G. Lamkin, PE to Senior Marine Consultant. As a Senior Marine Consultant

TORM CFO Zacho Resigns

Mads Peter Zacho, Chief Financial Offer at TORM, has resigned to become Chief Executive Officer at J. Lauritzen A/S. Mads has been with TORM since 2013 and will

DSME Reveals Additional Self-Restructuring Plan

South Korean shipbuilder Daewoo Shipbuilding and Marine Engineering (DSME) has  revealed an additional self-restructuring plan amid the falling shipbuilding orders.

Technology

Maritime Future Summit: Digital Shipping

Autonomous ships, smart on-board systems: At the Maritime Future Summit on September 5, industry leaders will discuss the future of shipping. For the first time

Wood Group Bags Statoil MSA

Wood Group has been awarded an evergreen master services agreement (MSA) by Statoil to support the life cycles of its offshore  and onshore facilities. Work and

Subsea 7 Awarded $1bn Wind Farm Offshore UK Deal

Subsea 7 S.A. informed today the details of the major(1) contract award that was first announced on 20 May 2016 . The contract was awarded by Beatrice Offshore Windfarm Limited (BOWL)(2),

Maritime Safety

Fail-proof System Access and Easy Operation

KVM redundancy concepts increase reliability of control room installations   German manufacturers G&D feel very much at home in especially safety-related control rooms.

Atlantic Hurricane Season Could be More Active

The Atlantic Ocean could be gearing up for an active hurricane season, meaning North American residents may want to pay attention. In recent years, single hurricanes

Container Weight Regulations

Starting July 1, 2016, the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Maritime Safety Committee approved amendments to The International Convention for the Safety of Life at Seas’ (SOLAS),

 
 
Maritime Contracts Maritime Standards Naval Architecture Navigation Offshore Oil Salvage Ship Electronics Shipbuilding / Vessel Construction Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.0839 sec (12 req/sec)