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Friday, October 28, 2016

Cat Delivers 3412C Marine Genset as a Complete MCS-Certified Package

February 17, 2006

The 3412C marine genset from Caterpillar Marine Power Systems now arrives at shipyards as a complete MCS-certified package. Vessel builders receive the ready-to-install genset as a complete package to be installed as a single component on-board in a simple “plug and play” fashion.

Caterpillar provides Marine Classification Society (MCS) certification direct from its factories. Vessel builders are assured a familiar genset electrical interface that is well documented in advance, allowing the shipyard to plan the installation and be prepared for simple on-board wiring configurations.

In addition, the genset arrives complete with a functionally tested alarm and protection system. Builders only have to connect the system to on-board components and test the panel with the ship’s system to confirm proper operation.

The 3412C genset features a 27-liter, turbocharged-aftercooled diesel engine. It is available with two different cooling systems: an engine-mounted radiator or a gear-driven, self-priming auxiliary seawater pump combined with a gear-driven centrifugal jacket water pump. The exhaust system consists of a watercooled manifold and turbocharger and a dry elbow and flange. The engine is IMO compliant for emissions regulations.

The genset base rails distribute the unit’s weight over a large area, allowing vessel builders to install it just about anywhere. Caterpillar has moved traditional genset production steps in-house to now provide factory built, packaged, tested and type approved marine gensets to its dealers and customers. MCS certification of several Caterpillar facilities allows the company to produce gensets like the 3412C according to MCS quality standards.

The MCS certified 3412C genset arrives at the shipyard as one completely certified unit, including the engine, generator, alarm and protection system and other mechanical additions. Caterpillar handles paperwork and approval responsibilities to obtain “type approval” on the unit. The only steps performed outside of the controlled factory environment are installation and a required on-board MCS functional test.

Compared to traditional genset installations, Caterpillar’s program takes several steps out of the hands of dealers and shipyards. In traditional genset production, dealers typically perform torsional vibration calculations, alarm and protection system installation, and mechanical additions – such as replacing temporary seal hoses with hard lines and adding drip trays underneath the filters. Before delivering the genset to the shipyard, paperwork must be submitted to a local MCS for review. If the paperwork is approved, the genset is then delivered and installed at the shipyard. There, a local MCS surveyor performs a functional test of the alarm and protection system.

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