Costa Concordia Tops 2012 Increase in Ship Losses

Press Release
Tuesday, January 08, 2013

But long-term downward trend continues.


•    106 ships lost worldwide in 2012, of which largest was Costa Concordia
•    Losses centered on South China and SE Asia seas
•    Industry initiatives address passenger vessels as well as the ‘human factor’ on board.


Twelve months on from the Costa Concordia incident, a new Allianz report identifies that 106 ship losses were reported worldwide in the 12 months to November 25 2012 - up from 91 ships the previous year but a 27 percent decrease on the ten year average of 146 ships per annum. Despite this long term downward trend, driven by technology, training and regulation and a proactive response from the shipping industry to safety improvement, human error remains the core challenge.


In its annual ‘Safety and Shipping Review’ of maritime losses, marine insurer Allianz Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS) highlights developments in shipping safety during 2012. The year was marked by two high profile accidents with the loss of the Costa Concordia off Italy on January 13th (the largest loss of the year at 114,137 gross tons) followed by that of the ferry, Rabaul Queen, off Papua New Guinea on February 2nd, both causing multiple fatalities.


According to the report, foundering (sinking or submerging) was the most common cause of losses in the past year (49 percent) followed by wrecking or running aground (22 percent). Collisions such as that involving the Baltic Ace and Corvus J in early December 2012 accounted for a relatively small number of losses (6 percent).


With 30 losses reported, twice as many shipping accidents centered on the seas around South China, Indo China, Indonesia and the Philippines. Shipping losses also occurred more often in the East Mediterranean and the Black Sea (15 losses in 2012) or around Japan, Korea and North China (10 losses).


Human error – still the key
The report highlights that human error remains a root cause of most incidents. Fatigue, economic pressures, and inadequate training are causes for concern. Dr Sven Gerhard of AGCS explains: “For some commercial ship-owners, especially in the hard-pressed bulk cargo and tanker sectors, there is little money for maintenance and little money for training.”


New regulation focuses on the problem of human error. The Maritime Labor Convention (2006), which comes into force later in 2013, will help improve safety by addressing the welfare and working conditions of seafarers. In general, passenger vessels have been the focus of attention throughout the year with both the International Maritime Organisation and the cruise ship industry taking action to tighten regulation and continuously improve operational practices.


Check and balance on the bridge

Major shipping companies have initiated self-regulation initiatives post-Costa Concordia, with the Cruise Lines International Association and the European Cruise Council partnering up to lead the industry-wide voluntary adoption of policies that go beyond international regulatory requirements.  In addition, moves previously pioneered in other industries (such as airlines) or by leading ship-owners are gathering force: for example, greater adoption across the industry of the ‘function-based bridge’ concept whereby the bridge command structure changes from the traditional captain’s sole command towards a ‘check and balance’ approach. “We see such self-regulation of the industry as the core driver of safety”, says Gerhard, who believes that such concepts will soon trickle down to other sectors where passenger safety is paramount.


In addition, technological improvements such as the introduction of mandatory Electronic Chart Display and Information Systems (ECDIS) in July 2012 are expected to reduce accidents, but only where properly applied with effective training and management oversight. “Technology is only as useful as the training behind it – and we don’t always see this human element keeping up with other advances. What we do see with the best ship-owners is a proactive safety management culture, going beyond the minimum standards and running from top to bottom of the organization. This can really make an impact in improving safety”, Gerhard says.



 

Maritime Reporter July 2015 Digital Edition
FREE Maritime Reporter Subscription
Latest Maritime News    rss feeds

People & Company News

KEP Marine Unveils KMGBL

KEP Marine – the manufacturer of type approved displays, computers and peripherals, announced  the release of the affordable, high-quality KMGBL Glass Bridge Light Displays.

New Load Measurement Solution for Port of Dampier

Strainstall designs and delivers a load measurement solution for the world’s largest floating wharf at Port of Dampier.   Strainstall, part of James Fisher and Sons plc,

Rolls-Royce Power Package for USS Zumwalt

Rolls-Royce announced delivery of the twin fixed pitch propellers to Bath Iron Works for installation on the U.S. Navy’s most modern surface combatant, the future USS Zumwalt,

Technology

BAE Systems Awards Software Contract to SENER

The Spanish company SENER, Ingeniería y Sistemas S.A has closed a contract with U.K.-based BAE Systems PLC for the integration between FORAN CAD/CAM System and

Carnival’s Costa Brand Orders Two LNG Cruise Ships

Costa’s two new cruise ships will be the largest ever built based on guest capacity; Costa will join sister brand AIDA Cruises in building the first-ever cruise

New Load Measurement Solution for Port of Dampier

Strainstall designs and delivers a load measurement solution for the world’s largest floating wharf at Port of Dampier.   Strainstall, part of James Fisher and Sons plc,

News

Idreco Delivers Dredger for Hydro-Dam in Congo

Idreco (International Dredger Constructions) of the Netherlands informs it has designed, built and installed its second dredger, an ISD 600 with a digging depth of 30 meters,

BAE Systems Awards Software Contract to SENER

The Spanish company SENER, Ingeniería y Sistemas S.A has closed a contract with U.K.-based BAE Systems PLC for the integration between FORAN CAD/CAM System and

Hawboldt Secures Cape Sharp Tidal Winch Deal

A third Nova Scotian company has secured a multimillion dollar contract with the Cape Sharp Tidal project, which has potential to be the first grid-connected tidal array in the world.

Maritime Safety

Self-lubricating Bearing Polymer: Safe, Easy to Machine

Many plastics and metallic alloys present machining challenges as some deform and are difficult to maintain exacting tolerances, while others require strict and

Diesel Spill in Houston Ship Channel

A small section of the Upper Houston Ship Channel was closed Tuesday morning after a report of 1,000 gallons of diesel entered Greens Bayou from a cement facility, the U.

BSEE Updates Hurricane Reporting Requirements

BSEE is providing updated guidance for the current and future hurricane seasons through a Notice to Lessees (NTL) released July 27, 2015. NTL 2015-G02 clarifies

 
 
Maritime Careers / Shipboard Positions Maritime Security Maritime Standards Offshore Oil Pod Propulsion Port Authority Salvage Ship Electronics Sonar Winch
rss | archive | history | articles | privacy | contributors | top maritime news | about us | copyright | maritime magazines
maritime security news | shipbuilding news | maritime industry | shipping news | maritime reporting | workboats news | ship design | maritime business

Time taken: 0.2588 sec (4 req/sec)